Tag: Dry Island

New York Rangers v Philadelphia Flyers

Former Philadelphia Flyer barely recognizes current Philadelphia Flyers


Interesting story here from NHL.com’s Gameday Skate Blog on Joffrey Lupul, the former Philadelphia Flyer that will face his old team tonight as a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Lupul wore the black-and-orange for two seasons (2007-09), scoring 45 goals while advancing to the 2008 Eastern Conference finals with teammates Mike Richards, Jeff Carter, Scottie Upshall and R.J. Umberger.

Those particular players have two things in common. One, they were all 25 or younger during that playoff run. And two, none of them play for Philadelphia anymore!

“The only guy (from Philadelphia) I keep in touch with is (Scott) Hartnell,” Lupul told NHL.com “I played with (Claude) Giroux and those guys but just for a short period of time. It’s a completely different animal over there now.”

A different animal indeed. Philly’s highly-publicized summer makeover (dealing Richards to L.A. and Carter to Columbus) was the biggest and final phase of the project — other 25-and-unders jettisoned from the 2008 roster included Steve Downie, Ryan Parent, Ben Eager and Riley Cote. It’s almost like the Flyers were upset with the direction the core of youngsters was taking them or something.

(*cough* Dry Island *cough*)

That said, GM Paul Holmgren deserves a lot of credit for successfully rebuilding on the fly. Most rebuilds involve a complete tear-down and laying a new foundation of draft picks (see: Edmonton) — the ones that try to do it on the fly are usually a disaster (see: Toronto). Yet Holmgren’s moved and managed assets while keeping the on-ice product highly competitive. Since he took over from Bobby Clarke in 2006, the Flyers have won six playoff rounds, advanced to two Eastern Conference finals and one Stanley Cup.

Holmgren also deserves credit for having two of the three 2000 Hart Trophy nominees (Jaromir Jagr and Chris Pronger) on the same team — 11 years after they were nominated. Which is just insane to think about. To put it in perspective, the Vezina nominees in 2000 were Curtis Joseph, Olaf Kolzig and Roman Turek. The last one of those guys to play was CuJo, and that was two years ago. You don’t even wanna know what happened to Turek.

Now, if Holmgren could find a way to coax Pavel Bure out of retirement…

Mike Richards moves on from Philadelphia, looks ahead to winning in Los Angeles

Mike Richards

It’s been a whirlwind last few days for new Los Angeles Kings forward Mike Richards. While he was traded to L.A. from Philadelphia just over a month ago in June, the talk of late has surrounded his days in Philadelphia as an apparent party boy that wasn’t taking his role with the Flyers as captain seriously and leading to him (and Jeff Carter) finding their way out of town.

While Richards has done his part to rebuff those allegations, the time to move forward is now. Richards finally had a chance to sit down and talk with the media in Los Angeles and get off on the right foot with Kings supporters. While Richards was one of the top men in Philly, he joins the Kings where a top center is already in place in Anze Kopitar and an old friend and teammate will join him in Simon Gagne. Having former Flyers head coach John Stevens as an assistant to Kings coach Terry Murray helps make the transition easier as well.

As for Richards,  he is eager to get things going in Southern California and get a fresh start.

“It’s always easier coming in when you know the system and not to have to learn the Xs and Os and there’s more focus on learning who you’re playing with,” Richards said Wednesday in his first formal meeting with the local media.

“When you don’t have to learn the system, it makes things a lot easier going through training camp. You’re not thinking too much as you normally would .. I think that’s going to be the biggest thing that’s going to help me get adjusted to L.A.”

Getting to play alongside former teammate Gagne and Kings captain Dustin Brown as well as Kopitar and Justin Williams as well will make life easier as well. As for the party boy talk and allegations that are trying to follow him to California, Richards is doing his part to move on from that and focus on Kings hockey. The Los Angeles Times’ Helene Elliott finds out that Richards is still smarting from all that.

Richards, who planned to fly back East on Thursday, said he looked forward to having a lower profile here. He said he didn’t know why he was traded but downplayed a recent Philadelphia Daily News story in which two unnamed Flyers said his hard partying was a factor.

“It’s tough sometimes seeing these articles or hearing some things that are said when you know that they aren’t true,” he said. “It’s almost mentally draining when you keep having to back your story up off the ice, defending yourself when people say things that aren’t really correct.”

Learning his lesson from these stories, true or not, should only help Richards stay intense and focused in L.A. Having Richards play in the Western Conference, where the play is a bit more physical and demanding thanks to travel and competition level, should help Richards look like one of the top centers in the game once again.

His physical play and scoring ability in Philadelphia helped set him apart in the East, but in the West he should thrive going up against other similar players. While his play on the ice will determine how he’s perceived, this change of scenery for Richards could prove to be the best thing for his career.

Mike Richards responds to all the hubbub surrounding ‘Dry Island’


In what might be the least shocking development of the week, current Los Angeles Kings and former Philadelphia Flyers center Mike Richards downplayed the “Dry Island” rumors during a Tuesday appearance on TSN’s That’s Hockey.

Richards didn’t deny the existence of the somewhat comically named idea, he just put it in what is likely the most realistic context: that it wasn’t that big of a deal. Now, it’s quite possible that character issues still were among the top reasons that the Flyers decided to part ways with Richards and Jeff Carter. It’s just tough to fathom that it all fell apart because they opted against enlisting in the equivalent to giving up booze for Lent.

Say what you will about Richards’ prickly relationship with the Philadelphia media – one of the other leading reasons why people think that he was traded – but he’s right that the duo didn’t get traded because of “Dry Island.” Richards even paraphrased the Las Vegas tourism motto when responding to the gossip.

“I believe what happens in the dressing room should stay in the dressing room,” Richards told TSN’s That’s Hockey on Tuesday. “It was just something that happened for a handful of guys, just more of a playful thing that half the team took part in and the other half didn’t.

“It wasn’t a big deal…It was just a joke around the locker room and obviously leaked out and someone’s trying to make a mountain out of it.”


“It couldn’t be further from the truth,” Richards told TSN. “Unfortunately, things get blown out of proportion and things get said and taken out of context too. I’m not sure if people are trying to get a sense of it or trying to convince other people that it was the reason, but at the same time, it’s not true at all.”

It’s easy to scoff a bit at “what happens in the locker room, stays in the locker room” line but it cuts to the core of this story’s biggest issue. If it’s true that Flyers GM Paul Holmgren gave his team a facelift for reasons that go beyond the franchise’s desperate urge for a reliable goalie, then he still has some surgery to do. Having two “unnamed sources” spill the beans about the inner workings of their locker room cannot be a great sign for the team’s sense of order.

Philadelphia Sports Daily transcribed some comments from Laviolette, who echoed the sentiment about locker room details surfacing but didn’t seem to think that “Dry Island” was such a “playful thing.”

“I just don’t think a lot of that should come out,” Laviolette said on 97.5 FM Monday, “for the simple reason of what you guys are talking about. Maybe some guys do some things, maybe some guys don’t do some things. And then there’s a reflection of what does happen or doesn’t happen from inside the locker room and it paints a poor picture.”

However, Laviolette didn’t see “Dry Island” as a “joke” or “playful thing,” as Richards suggested.

“My point was whether you were having three glasses of wine, or one beer, or one vodka — my point was that any alcohol that got taken out of play in that stretch run, while we were trying to push to get back to the playoffs, could have helped our team in any way,” he said. “We did the best we could to get back into position of the playoffs.”

Ultimately, this is a story because of the team and players involved – not to mention how funny the phrase “Dry Island” looks in print. Blaming partying as the driving force behind the departure of the Flyers’ still-young center duo is even sillier than calling anything “Dry Island.”