Tag: Drew Doughty

Selanne, Andersen

PHT Morning Skate: Ducks’ Andersen unveils mask honoring Selanne


PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Frederik Andersen has a special mask for Sunday’s Teemu Tribute Night:

Editor’s Note: Pro Hockey Talk’s partner FanDuel is hosting an $20,000 Fantasy Hockey league for Friday night’s NHL games. It’s just $2 to join and first prize is $2,000. Starts Friday at 7:00 p.m. ET. Here’s the FanDuel link.

Is it time for the Edmonton Oilers to cut their losses and trade Nail Yakupov? (Edmonton Journal)

Chicago Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews talked about what J.P. Parise, who passed away at the age of 73, meant to him and other young hockey players growing up:

Defenseman Adam Larsson, 22, is looking like one of the big benefactors of the New Jersey Devils’ coaching change. (The Bergen Record)

Drew Doughty wants to be involved in the only aspect of the game Los Angeles hasn’t been using him in: the shootout. (LA Kings Insider)

The AHL Hershey Bears will feature Nathan Walker, who was the first Australian player to be drafted by an NHL team, in a snow globes giveaway. Inside is Walker standing next to a kangaroo. (CSN Washington)

PHT’s top 14 of ’14: Canada dominates en route to Olympic gold

Carey Price

The numbers alone explain how well Canada played at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi:

Six games, six wins, 17 goals for, three allowed.

But to get a better sense of how truly dominant the team was, consider what the guy that built it said.

“Since I’ve been around, it’s the most impressive, the greatest display of defensive hockey,” Canadian GM Steve Yzerman said after a 3-0 win over Sweden in the gold medal game. “They were committed to this, and I think that’s ultimately why we won is because our leaders, our best players, said, ‘Guys we’re going to win; we don’t care about individual statistics.’

“We’re going to play the right way.”

And play the right way they did. The Canadians re-wrote the history books in Sochi, never trailing for a single second of the tournament while setting an Olympic record for fewest goals allowed. They also became the first back-to-back gold medalists since the Soviet Union turned the trick in 1984 and ’88, and were the first Canadian team to go undefeated at the Olympics since the Conn Smythe-led 1928 team ran the table at St. Moritz.

In Sochi, Canada’s opponents acknowledged just how talented a squad they were up against.

“They played unbelievable defense,” said Sweden’s Niklas Hjalmarsson, per the National Post. “One of the best teams I’ve ever played against, for sure.”

Of course, there were individual standouts. Carey Price finished the tournament with an 164-minute shutout streak and was named top goalie. Drew Doughty led the team with six points in six games en route to best defenseman honors. Shea Weber got one past the seemingly unbeatable Kristers Gudlevskis in the quarterfinal win over Latvia, and Jamie Benn scored the all-important goal in the 1-0 semifinal win over the U.S.

But in the end, it was Canada’s team game that stood out. A collection of individual stars buying in and accepting their roles — P.K. Subban, a Norris Trophy winner, played 11 minutes the entire tournament — while understanding that, for six games, they were all combining for something historic.

“It’s a great team that we had in this tournament,” Jonathan Toews said, per the Globe. “You can see it developing, the chemistry in the locker room, the guys start to understand their roles. It’s not easy for some guys. You look at guys like Roberto Luongo or Marty St. Louis, or even Sharpie (Patrick Sharp) tonight, guys that have made sacrifices to win the gold medal. You ask them, I don’t think they care.

“It’s an amazing feeling to be a part of a team like that, whether your role was big or small … we’re just an amazing team to watch, the way we work together.”

Report: Contract talks underway between Kings, Williams


From ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun:

Williams, 33, is in the last of a four-year, $14.6 million deal that carries a $3.65M annual cap hit. For that money, Williams has been a very productive player for the Kings — two 20-goal seasons, one Conn Smythe and the “Mr. Game 7” moniker — but he’s not getting any younger, and the Kings don’t have a ton of cap space moving forward.

The team’s financial issues this season have been well-documented, especially after playing shorthanded on a couple of occasions following the Slava Voynov suspension. What’s more, GM Dean Lombardi has gone heavy on the lengthy, big-money contracts — Voynov, Alec Martinez, Jake Muzzin, Drew Doughty, Dustin Brown, Mike Richards, Marian Gaborik, Jeff Carter and Jonathan Quick are all signed through 2019 — and still has some key RFA negotiations on the horizon this summer in Kyle Clifford, Tanner Pearson and Tyler Toffoli.

Per CapGeek, the Kings have only 14 players under contract at approximately $60 million for next season. If the ceiling is to rise to the projected $73M, that’d give L.A. around $13 million to fill out its active roster.

What that means for Williams remains to be seen.

Video: P.K. Subban scores, getting the better of Drew Doughty (Updated)

P.K. Subban

L.A. Kings star defenseman Drew Doughty, felt he had to outplay Montreal Canadiens star defenseman P.K. Subban if his team was to win on Friday.

Well, that’s not going according to plan for Doughty, or the Kings.

Subban had scored twice to help the Canadiens to a 3-0 lead after 40 minutes of play, victimizing goalie Martin Jones on a pair of long shots – a wrist shot in the first and a slapper in the second. Meanwhile, Doughty didn’t have a point in almost 20 minutes of ice time through two periods.

Not sure Darryl Sutter will be too pleased with his goaltending. The Kings had a wide advantage in shots through two periods, with the Canadiens, on home ice, firing only 11 shots on Jones. He was beaten three times.

Updated: Montreal’s first goal of the game, originally credited to Subban, has now been credited to Jiri Sekac. Subban still gets the assist, finishing the night with two points.

And here is Subban’s second goal of the evening, which came in the second period.

Doughty: I outplayed Karlsson, now I want to outplay Subban


Interesting quote here from Kings blueliner Drew Doughty, coming off last night’s win in Ottawa while looking ahead to tonight’s affair in Montreal (from NHL.com):

After facing Senators captain Erik Karlsson on Thursday, Doughty will match up against another of the NHL’s elite defensemen for a second straight night in Montreal’s P.K. Subban.

“I always obviously want to outplay the opposing team’s best defenseman. I think [Thursday] I did it for sure, [Friday is] going to be a tough challenge.

“P.K.’s a good player; I’m going to have to outplay him if we want to win the game.”

Doughty had a huge effort in Thursday’s 5-3 win over the Sens by recording two assists, three hits and playing a team-high 26:56. While Karlsson played more (28:25), he failed to record a single point and finished minus-2.

Tonight, Doughty gets his shot at Subban.

While he didn’t directly come out and say it, one has to think these matchups hold special significance, especially since Karlsson and Subban have won a Norris Trophy — one of the few accolades that’s eluded Doughty over his seven-year career.

The 25-year-old has only been a finalist once, finishing third behind Duncan Keith and Mike Green in 2010; when Subban won in ’13, Doughty got just a single first-place vote and when Karlsson won in ’12, Doughty received just one third-place vote.

This season, Doughty is averaging the most playing time of his career — 28:46 a night — and is on pace to score 42 points, which would be his most since recording a career-high 59 during the 2009-10 campaign (which, as mentioned above, coincided with his first and only Norris nomination.)