Tag: Douglas Murray

Michel Therrien

Canadiens ink Therrien to four-year extension


Montreal Canadiens GM Marc Bergevin is keeping things busy the day after the Stanley Cup Final.

The Canadiens announced they’ve signed coach Michel Therrien to a four-year extension to remain behind the bench in Montreal through the 2018-19 season. Therrien re-joined the Habs as coach in 2012 and led them to the Eastern Conference Final this season.

“We’re very happy to have agreed to a contract extension with Michel Therrien for multiple seasons,” Bergevin said in the team’s release. “Michel is an accomplished and experienced coach who has instilled a culture of hard work in our organization while helping develop our young players. Michel and his coaching staff work in a unique and demanding hockey market and the team’s success over the last two seasons are a reflection of their excellent work. This decision reflects our desire for stability and consistency within our hockey operations department.”

Therrien’s decisions are always under a microscope in Montreal and this season, in spite of the success the team had, he faced harsh questions about his lineup decisions. In particular his use of Douglas Murray in the postseason as opposed to Francis Bouillon or Jarred Tinordi in the early rounds seemed to rankle Habs supporters.

At the very least, the Habs must be sold that Therrien’s ways are good for Carey Price and P.K. Subban as they’re both going to be there a long time.

Now that Therrien has four more years, Bergevin hopes the success the team had this season can be built upon and get the Canadiens back to the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 1993.

Bergevin, Lombardi, Murray named GM of the Year finalists

Ray Shero

Montreal’s Marc Bergevin, Los Angeles’ Dean Lombardi and Anaheim’s Bob Murray have been nominated for the 2014 General Manager of the Year award, the NHL announced on Friday.

This marks Lombardi’s first time as a finalist and the second for Murray and Bergevin, who finished behind Pittsburgh’s Ray Shero for last year’s award.

The voting, conducted among the 30 club general managers and a panel of NHL executives, managed to overlook what GM Jim Nill did in Dallas this year. Despite orchestrating the Tyler Seguin blockbuster, drafting Valeri Nichushkin and overseeing the end of a five-year playoff drought, Nill wasn’t named one of the three finalists — which has to come as something of a surprise, especially given this was his first year in charge.

That said, perhaps Nill will be relieved he wasn’t among the nominees.

Of the four previous GM of the Year award winners — the honor was implemented for the 2009-10 campaign — two have lost their jobs. Vancouver’s Mike Gillis, who won in 2010-11, was dismissed from his gig in early April; Shero, who won the award last year, was fired shortly after Pittsburgh’s collapse to the Rangers in the second round of this year’s playoffs.

Here’s the rundown of the three finalists, per NHL.com:

Marc Bergevin, Montreal Canadiens

Bergevin guided the Canadiens (46-28-8, 100 points) to their second 100-point season since 1992-93, leading the team to the playoffs for the second time in as many years as general manager. He bolstered the offense with the summer signing of Daniel Briere and also added grit with the offseason acquisitions of Douglas Murray and George Parros. Bergevin then shored up the roster with midseason trades for Thomas Vanek, Mike Weaver and Dale Weise, all of whom played critical roles in the team advancing to the Eastern Conference Final for the second time in the past five seasons.

Dean Lombardi, Los Angeles Kings

Under the direction of Lombardi, the Kings (46-28-8, 100 points) earned their fifth consecutive playoff berth, recorded their fourth 100-point season in franchise history and made their third straight appearance in the Western Conference Final. He solidified the team’s blue line by re-signing defensemen Alec Martinez, Jake Muzzin and Slava Voynov and did the same up front by bringing back Dustin Brown, Kyle Clifford, Trevor Lewis and Jordan Nolan. Lombardi then kick-started the club’s offense with the addition of Marian Gaborik at the Trade Deadline; after being blanked six times in 63 games prior to his arrival, the Kings were not shut out once in the final 19 contests of the regular season with Gaborik in the lineup.

Bob Murray, Anaheim Ducks

Murray paved the way for the finest season in Ducks history, leading the team to its second straight Pacific Division title; the top record in the Western Conference for the first time in club history; and franchise records in wins (54), points (116), points percentage (.707), home wins (29) and road wins (25). He set the Ducks up for success by re-signing Matt Beleskey, Saku Koivu, Ben Lovejoy and Kyle Palmieri as well as enticing Teemu Selanne to return for one final season. Murray also traded for Mathieu Perreault during the preseason; added depth players in Mark Fistric, Tim Jackman, Stephane Robidas and Jakob Silfverberg; and oversaw the development of young goaltenders Frederik Andersen and John Gibson.

In case you’re wondering, the two GMs that won the award and are still employed are Phoenix’s Don Maloney and St. Louis’ Doug Armstrong.

Where did Ray Shero go wrong?

Ray Shero

When Ray Shero took over as the Pittsburgh Penguins general manager in 2006, he had a golden opportunity. Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin had been drafted in the previous two years, giving the team the foundation for a dynasty.

In 2008, Crosby and Malkin led Pittsburgh to the Stanley Cup Final. One year later, the Penguins won it all. They haven’t done it since, and Shero has been shown the door as a result.

What could Shero have done differently? Certainly, he made some good moves along the way. In recent years he traded for forwards James Neal, Chris Kunitz, and Pascal Dupuis, and signed them all to reasonable contracts. Each member of that trio has grown since joining the Penguins, giving them a formidable group of top-six forwards.

But what about their bottom two lines? Championship teams are known for their depth and that’s hard to get when you have $17.4 million annually ($18.2 million starting in 2014-15) of your cap hit going to two forwards, no matter how talented they might be.

That’s a problem the Chicago Blackhawks haven’t had to deal with. Yet. Like Pittsburgh, Chicago is built around two young superstars in Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane, but that duo is costing the team just $12.6 million annually against the cap. Both are pending unrestricted free agents after the 2014-15 campaign, however.

What could Shero have done to prevent this problem? The bold move would have been to trade one of Malkin or Crosby — likely the former rather than latter. He could have practically dictated the price and built the offense around Crosby, while retaining enough cap flexibility to assemble a balanced group.

Or, he could’ve just drafted better. Since the 2008 draft, the Penguins haven’t selected a single player that has gone on to participate in at least 100 NHL games.

Using Chicago as a comparison again, the ‘Hawks have drafted three forwards since 2008 that have surpassed the 100-game mark: Andrew Shaw, Brandon Saad, and Marcus Kruger. Ben Smith is just shy with 95 regular-season contests — which is still more than any Penguins drafted player (Simon Despres, 85) has managed over that span.

All four of those Blackhawks were taken after the first round. Since 2008, the Penguins have just one non-first round pick that has played in at least 15 NHL games: Ben Hanowski, who’s no longer with the organization.

Then of course there’s the Penguins defense. It’s rare for any team to win the Cup without a superb blue line, and while Pittsburgh does have Kris Letang, its defense as a whole is somewhat less than superb.

Shero tried to address that by bringing in defensive defensemen, but his recent experiments — veterans Douglas Murray and then Rob Scuderi — haven’t produced the results he was hoping for. Ultimately, in both cases it might have been a matter of chasing after players that were past their primes.

The next Penguins general manager will have to decide if he wants to stay the course or do something bold. The depth problems in Pittsburgh aren’t going to get any easier to address given that Letang’s eight-year, $58 million contract is about to begin. Can this team stay competitive while giving more than $25 million annually to just three players?

Shero clearly thought they could. The next guy might disagree.

Related: Now is the time to explore trading Letang

Canadiens’ Beaulieu will make career playoff debut tonight

Nathan Beaulieu

Boston Bruins forward Matt Fraser played in his first career postseason game on Thursday and ended up scoring the game-winning goal in overtime. With their backs against the wall, the Montreal Canadiens have to hope that 21-year-old defenseman Nathan Beaulieu will be at least respectable.

Like Fraser before him, Beaulieu will be making his NHL playoff debut tonight. The difference is that the stakes are even higher now as Montreal is down 3-2 in the second round series.

Beaulieu has 23 games worth of regular season experience and has four assists over that span. He also had seven goals and 27 points in 57 contests with the AHL Hamilton Bulldogs in 2013-14.

He’s projected to play alongside Mike Weaver, per the Boston Globe’s Fluto Shinzawa. Douglas Murray has been scratched after logging just 10:03 minutes in Game 5 on Saturday.

Update: Montreal has also confirmed that Daniel Briere is back in at the expense of Travis Moen.

PHT Morning Skate: Habs face elimination, Ducks-Kings roll into Game 5

Montreal Canadiens v Boston Bruins - Game Five

We’re at that point of the second round when a team could book their passage to the Conference Finals on any night. Such is the case for the Boston Bruins on the road in Montreal after they came away with a strong victory in Game 5.

Winning at Bell Centre isn’t an easy thing to do and there’s nothing more the Canadiens would like to do than to have one more crack at the Bruins in a Game 7. To do that Montreal has to find a way to slow the Bruins down on all lines.

Out West, the Ducks and Kings meet in a Game 5 that sees Anaheim returning home after taking both games in Los Angeles. If the Ducks can find a way to defend home ice, they might be in business. Now that they’ve evened-up the series and found a way to slow down the Kings, perhaps the confidence returns at Honda Center.

Game 6: Montreal Canadiens vs. Boston Bruins (Boston leads series 3-2) [7:30 p.m. ET — NBCSN]

There was a lot to take out of Game 5 that had absolutely nothing to do with Shawn Thornton hosing down P.K. Subban with a water bottle and most of it wasn’t good for the Habs.

Without Daniel Briere in the lineup, the Canadiens’ power play struggled and with Douglas Murray playing alongside Mike Weaver on the third pairing, the Bruins had a defensive pair to get the match-ups they wanted to get things going against. The Habs may have had a physically tougher lineup to deal with Zdeno Chara and Milan Lucic, but life was a little too easy for Bruins.

How Montreal makes adjustments tonight will be the absolute factor in whether they head back to Boston for Game 7 or not. For Boston, they need to find a way to get David Krejci involved as he’s been more than quiet in this series.

Game 5: Anaheim Ducks vs. Los Angeles Kings (Series tied 2-2) [10:00 p.m. ET — NBCSN]

It’s a bit unnerving to see the road teams win all the games in this series. It’s not that Anaheim or L.A. have overly distinct home-ice advantages, but more that the coaches couldn’t find ways to make their match-ups work for them.

After Games 1 and 2, the prevailing thought was how Bruce Boudreau was going to get his top line with Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry away from Anze Kopitar after he held them in check so well. After Games 3 and 4, the thought is how the Kings can slow down the rest of the Ducks forwards who have stepped up.

After being a major factor early on, the Kings would love to see the opportunistic Marian Gaborik return. The Ducks had their own version of a clutch scorer going in Devante Smith-Pelly.

The main man L.A. has to find a way to crack, however, is goalie John Gibson. After sporting a shutout in Game 4, he’s riding high and the team is doing so with him. Shaking the rookie’s confidence would get the Kings back on track at least a little bit.