Tag: Donald Brashear


“Goon” is cinema’s love letter to hockey enforcers


Hockey movies fall into two categories generally, they either go down as iconic (“Slap Shot” “Miracle”) or they go down in flames (“The Love Guru”). You can chalk up “Goon” as being an iconic film of its own.

One of the stars of the movie is Liev Schreiber, who plays the movie’s antagonist Ross “The Boss” Rhea, says it’s hard to do a hockey movie the right way and to do something no one’s seen before.

“How do you do a hockey movie fresh? How do you add anything to the anthology of hockey movies? One thing that Jay [Baruchel] really defines this movie with is the heart. That’s the one thing people don’t often talk about when they talk about hockey,” says Schreiber.

“I think it’s also something that defines hockey players. There’s a very strict code, especially among enforcers, of how you treat each other and you leave it all on the ice. Respect.”

Schreiber’s character Rhea plays the foil to Seann William Scott’s Doug Glatt and while you might be able to say that Rhea is the villain, that’s not the way Schreiber sees it.

source:  “I, personally, would disagree highly in saying Ross is a villain,” Schreiber says with a laugh.

“Guys like Probert, Georges Laraque, Donald Brashear, Dave Schultz… It was impactful to read about these guys’ lives and the misperception of them both as not hockey players and as goons. I think that’s part of what hurts for those guys.

“They give so much of their bodies and their lives to the game… I don’t know how many of them want to be remembered as purely enforcers or goons. I think a lot of those guys were great hockey players and that’s how they should be remembered.”

If it sounds like big talk for what’s a comedic movie, you’d be missing the point. “Goon” is a funny and violent film with enough bad language to make a sailor proud, but what’s hockey without all that?

“Goon” is a movie made by hockey fans (Director Michael Dowse and writer/co-star Jay Baruchel) with a metric ton of heart and it shows in how it plays out. Passing on watching this one would be a mistake.

“Goon” is currently available on Video On Demand and will hit theaters on March 30.

Former NHL enforcer Donald Brashear to try his hand at mixed martial arts

Donald Brashear, Eric Boulton

When you’re an enforcer in the new NHL it’s tough to keep your career chugging along if all you’re capable of doing is just dropping the gloves and having a go of it at the opposing team’s brawler. These days you have to bring a little extra to the table and for former NHL enforcer Donald Brashear he wasn’t able to keep up with things.

After playing his last NHL game back in January 2010 with the New York Rangers, he was demoted to the minor leagues where he stayed until he was traded to Atlanta and then released. Since then, Brashear’s been making his home in a low level Quebec professional league. With that not being anywhere near as glamorous as the NHL or even the AHL, Brashear is taking his bare-knuckle skills to an arena that’s much more befitting his skill set.

Brashear is set to become a mixed martial arts fighter as he’s apparently signed a deal with a Canadian promotion called Ringside MMA. It’s not just a career change for Brashear though as there are some extenuating circumstances for him switching from hockey to fighting. Patricia Vincent of MMADiehards.com says that Brashear might just be running from the law.

Now playing in the Ligue Nord-Américaine de Hockey (LNAH), Brashear has recently been investigated for an incident that allegedly occurred at the end of a game against the Trois-Rivières team on March 25.  Charges of assault were filed against Brashear, who was also suspended for five games.

The complaint has been filed against Brashear, on behalf of the alleged victim, Eric Labelle, by the Trois-Riviere team, Caron et Guay, and is now in the hands of the crown prosecutor.

Perhaps we can just say that Brashear was just getting warmed up for his latest career choice instead and call it a day. It’s fascinating to see this kind of move for the 39 year-old Brashear but if nothing else he’s shown over the course of his NHL career that he’s capable of throwing lefts and rights. If Brashear gets licensed in time he could be ready to fight in the promotions June 4th event in Quebec City. Let’s just hope that Brashear knows he can’t just grab on to the jersey and hug it out when he’s inside the octagon.

Catching up with former NHL enforcer Donald Brashear

Eric Goddard, Donald Brashear

When you ask hockey fans to name the most fearsome enforcers of the last decade, it’s likely that Donald Brashear would be among the first names mentioned. Yet with enforcers becoming less and less prevalent in the NHL, it seems silly for a professional team to waste $1.4 million of cap space on a guy who doesn’t do anything with his hands but throw punches.

So Brashear found himself shuffled around the depths of the New York Rangers and Atlanta Thrashers’ minor league systems the last two seasons, often being paid handsomely to not play hockey.

Jeff Z. Klein of the New York Times caught up with the fading enforcer in the LNAH (Ligue Nord-Américaine de Hockey), an obscure semipro league inhabited almost entirely by French-speaking players who squeeze 44-game seasons into their lives as they work day jobs. Apparently a point-per-game player in the marginal league, Brashear says he still enjoys being one of the guys and is happy to fight far less frequently. (Although that story included video of an ugly LNAH incident in which Brashear more or less loses his mind.)

The most interesting part of the article revolves around Brashear reflecting on his final seasons and the changing landscape in the NHL.

Q. Your last year, with the Rangers [36 games, 0 goals, 1 assist, minus-9, 73 penalty minutes, 13 fights, 6:15 average ice time], did that go well?

A. Not at all. At some point the role I had to fulfill wasn’t — I didn’t like it anymore. It was more like, “Just get on the ice and fight.” When I met with the coach in the summer before, he was telling me I was going to have all sorts of ice time, but he never gave it to me.

Fighting is not a big part of the game in the N.H.L. right now. If there’s fighting it’s more the middleweight guys. I feel like I played at the right time, and they decided to change the rules, and it was toward the end of my career. I tried to make it last. It was good, and now it’s over.

Read the rest of the interview here.