Tag: Don Meehan

Jarome Iginla

Trade time? Iginla and Flames not talking extension


Jarome Iginla figures to have a lot of talk swirling about him as we head towards the April 3 trade deadline. He’s on the final year of his contract and with the Flames struggling to be a true playoff contender and in need of a rebuild, he figures to earn plenty of interest from Cup-contending teams.

Eric Francis of the Calgary Sun adds to that speculation reporting that Iginla and the Flames haven’t yet talked about a contract extension. Iginla’s agent, Don Meehan, shared that information with the Sun and after spending the past 16 seasons with Calgary you’d think they would want to work on something like that.

If Iginla decides to not stay in Calgary, GM Jay Feaster could get a great return for someone of his caliber and there will be plenty of teams eager to go for him. Think of what a team like Pittsburgh or Boston would be like with a power wing like Iginla on board for a Cup run.

This situation bears watching and with just three weeks until the deadline, you have to think Calgary will be active in figuring out whether or not they want to stop “going for it.”

Kings and Drew Doughty agree on 8-year, $56 million contract

Drew Doughty

After months of negotiating and a stress-filled summer for Kings fans all over California, the waiting (and worrying) has finally come to an end. According to TSN’s Bob McKenzie, the Los Angeles Kings and restricted agent Drew Doughty have at last come to terms on an 8-year, $56 million contract. And not a moment too soon.

In an official press release, the Kings announced that the two sides had come to a verbal agreement.  Needless to say, the announcement ignited celebrations for hockey fans in Los Angeles; and shouts of denial from opposing fans who still  held out hope that their team would sign the restricted free agent an offer sheet.

“The Los Angeles Kings have reached a verbal agreement with restricted free agent defenseman Drew Doughty on a multi-year contract, Kings President/General Manager Dean Lombardi announced tonight.”

By all measures, the two sides came together on a deal at the last minute. The Kings finally budged after insisting that he average cap hit of any deal would not exceed Anze Kopitar’s team high $6.8 million per season. From Doughty’s side, the young defenseman accepted an eight-year deal—a longer term than he may have preferred. The $7 million average salary per season will make him the third-highest paid defenseman—trailing only Shea Weber’s one-year contract and Brian Campbell’s ridiculous $7.1 million per season. Kings’ governor Tim Leiweke praised GM Dean Lombardi for getting a deal done that works for the team.

“Dean did a good job here. Dean is unbelievable with the budget and the forecasting and, as you know, he’s a professor when it comes to the boxes and forecasting where we’re going long-term. So he was passionate about protecting ourselves with some flexibility here. I feel good about the fact that we have someone that has the vision that Dean has, long-term, and is keeping the nucleus together. But he’s also smart, and he knows eight years is eight years. And this kid is 21 years old. He’s going to 29, and still in his prime, when he’s done with this contract. That’s a good thing for the franchise. The guy that isn’t mentioned here, Mr. Anschutz, he has broken the bank here. We are sending a very strong message to our fans. We’re committed to winning, and we just proved it again.”

Three weeks ago, there were reports that the Kings had offered the 21-year-old defenseman a 9-year deal worth $6.8 million per season.

From the Kings point of view, it’s easy easy to understand their excitement. The 8-year deal will eat up four of Doughty’s valuable “unrestricted years,” at a reasonable $7 million per season. One of the difficult parts of the negotiating process is that there’s no real comparable salary for a player like Doughty. He’s already become the second youngest player to be nominated for the Norris Trophy and proved he belonged among the league’s elite at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

The timing also worked out for Los Angeles as well. There were plenty of artificial deadlines; but both sides understood that a deal needed to be reached by the end of the week or Doughty would miss regular season games. The Kings have two more preseason games in North America before leaving for Europe on Saturday night. People around the organization said they hoped to sign him in time to participate in a couple of preseason games before the regular season started in Berlin. With tonight’s deal, the team will decide if they want him to play in Saturday’s preseason game against the Avalanche before heading to their final preseason game on Tuesday in Hamburg, Germany.

For Doughty, he instantly becomes one of the highest paid defensemen (and players) in the NHL. He successfully skipped his “second contract” and jumped right to his huge payday at the tender age of 21. $7 million per season will buy quite a few cocktails for the man who recently reached the legal drinking age.

Symbolically, it shows that the organization realizes he’s an crucial piece to their puzzle. He’s now the highest paid player on a team that not only has playoff aspirations, but Stanley Cup dreams. No pressure there kid.

Now comes the tough part. As weird as it may sound after this prolonged three month ordeal, someone may want to tell Doughty that negotiating the contract is the easy part. Now he’ll have the next eight years to prove that he’s worth it. With that kind of money and the type of team the Kings have assembled this season, individual statistics may not be enough to justify that kind of contract.

All the sudden, the stakes have been raised for Drew Doughty and the LA Kings. A Norris Trophy? He has eight years. Legitimate playoff performer? He has eight years. Stanley Cup?

You get the idea…

Terry Murray has Drew Doughty ‘in the front’ of his mind regarding lineup options

Dallas Stars v Los Angeles Kings

When it comes to the muddled negotiations between Drew Doughty’s reps and the Los Angeles Kings, the cliche “No news is good news” isn’t really true. As I wrote before, it seems like Kings GM Dean Lombardi and Doughty’s agent Don Meehan are in a tense staring contest with millions – not to mention the Kings’ seemingly promising upcoming season – hanging in the balance.

The latest news is more of the same: the word from Lombardi’s camp is that there’s nothing new to report regarding the negotiations according to report by Helene Elliott of the Los Angeles Times.

With the underlying feeling of hostility permeating between at least some people involved, it’s easy for some to forget that Doughty will eventually need to return to work with the team that drafted him second overall in 2008. Kings coach Terry Murray told Elliott that he has Doughty in mind when drawing up line combinations.

But Murray said that in preparing for the season, “he’s very much in the front of my mind whenever I sit down and go through the lines and the defense pairings. … If things happen where he’s here two days before the season starts, he’s in the lineup and ready to go.”

It’s not exactly ideal for Doughty to miss most – if not all – of training camp and the preseason, but he shouldn’t take a long time to shake off the rust whenever he signs with the Kings. Let’s hope it’s sooner rather than later, though.

(H/T to Rotoworld.)

Something (or someone) has to give as Drew Doughty negotiations remain stalled

Los Angeles Kings v Detroit Red Wings

Los Angeles Kings GM Dean Lombardi and Drew Doughty’s agent Don Meehan are currently engaged in the multimillion dollar equivalent of a staring contest. Ideally, both sides will find a way to compromise, but it’s just as likely that only one will blink. Let’s just hope that Doughty doesn’t miss any regular season games in the process.

The latest news is that there really isn’t news; the impasse remains. There’s no denying Lombardi’s history with Meehan, either – it’s quite possible that the 2002 holdouts by Evgeni Nabokov and Brad Stuart cost him his job as the San Jose Sharks general manager. Lombardi isn’t exactly sitting idly by, though, as the blustery GM made a startling claim that Doughty’s cash reward will drop about $25,000 for every day that he goes without a contract. Lombardi’s reasoning is based on the CBA, but it’s hard to look at it as anything but tense negotiations leading him to play hard ball with a player who is probably the biggest asset on a rising team.

While Lombardi might look bad for pulling back the curtain on the contract talks – and let’s face it, he’s not known for being shy about making controversial comments (see: Jack Johnson and Dustin Penner) – Doughty faces the reality of missing training camp with teammates. Sometimes that can entail some ugly things being said, with words like “greed” (or worse) being thrown around.

Elliotte Friedman shares Marty Turco’s perspective on what it must feel like to be in a game of holdout chicken, especially once training camp begins.

“This is when it hits you,” Turco said Friday morning. “Your teammates are in training camp and you’re not. It’s scary. People start saying things. You hear it, take it personally.”

Turco was unsigned when camp began in 2003, at home in Sault Ste. Marie. The standoff lasted one week before he agreed to a three-year, $12-million deal.

“I’ve always lived my life to have no regrets, but at this time, you certainly wonder if you’re doing the right thing.”

Eventually, someone – or preferably all sides – will need to cave in and do just that: the right thing. The Kings might be wise not to assume that Doughty will follow in Bobby Ryan’s footsteps by negotiating his own (team-friendly) contract without Meehan. Some people might plead with Doughty to give in a bit while others might chide Lombardi & Co. for being too stubborn, but the longer this battle of attrition goes on, the worse all sides end up looking.

Maybe Doughty and Meehan should relax their monetary demands ever so slightly. Perhaps the Kings should shorten the term of the deal, even if that means accepting the reality of Doughty becoming an unrestricted free agent that much sooner. Either way, something (and someone) has to give in this situation.

If it comes down to an either/or scenario, which side should budge first? Should Doughty accept less than he might be worth or should the Kings just suck it up and pay their best player? Let us know if you lean one way or the other in the comments.

Lombardi: Drew Doughty’s contract offer drops nearly $25,000 each day he isn’t signed

Dallas Stars v Los Angeles Kings

Kings training camp opened up today and, as expected, Drew Doughty wasn’t there to join the team for their fitness tests and physicals. Kings GM Dean Lombardi and Doughty’s agent Don Meehan are still in the process of negotiating a long-term deal for the cornerstone defenseman and those negotiations haven’t exactly been going well.

Today, Lombardi spoke with L.A. Kings Insider’s Rich Hammond to give his thoughts on the situation and while Lombardi isn’t happy that things are taking this long with Doughty, the flip side of that is that the longer Doughty continues to holdout for a new deal it’s going to hurt his wallet as well.

Hammond gets the word from Lombardi that for each day Doughty isn’t signed it’s going to take money from the last offer the Kings made to the 2010 Norris Trophy finalist.

Question: All that said, at the risk of asking a simple question, what’s next?

LOMBARDI: “The problem we have, and we’re going to have to see how this evolves, is that generally with a player, you establish his market value and he signs up for 275 days of work. That was the one thing that changed during the CBA, that players were paid during training camp. So, quite frankly, it’s the way we have to approach this. Let alone missing a day or work, as well as getting behind your teammates in terms of preparation. It probably makes this a little more difficult, but you have to factor that in now. You’re not getting a full year’s work as of today.”

Question: Meaning the offer gets reduced by however many days he’s not here?

LOMBARDI: “Well, as we talked about before, there has to be some finality, in terms of when the players are supposed to report. It’s no different, I think, than what the other teams have done. It’s, `OK, now we have to regroup here and see what evolves,’ and then I have to go back to ownership. It’s no different than anything else. You do this based on 275 days of work, and now it’s down to 274.”

By Hammond’s math (and ours, we double-checked) the last offer on the table was for $6.8 million a year and dividing that by 275 gets you a daily cost of $24,727.27. We’re sure that anyone else around the world would love to make nearly $25,000 a day, but for Doughty the pressure is on now to get something worked out and fast.

While Doughty is a restricted free agent and he can do as he wishes to get the right kind of deal, the fact that there’s been no offer sheets presented to him or any other RFA this summer and teams are now entering training camp with the rosters they feel they can win with, Doughty’s options are pretty limited as to what he can do.

Essentially, Doughty either has to compromise and take the Kings’ offer or continue to sit at home waiting for the Kings to cave in to his demands. Waiting for Dean Lombardi to blink could leave Doughty waiting around for a while. Doughty would certainly benefit from being in camp and with the Kings having such high hopes heading into this season, it would do both him and the team a world of good to have him there from the get-go. For now, they’ll all have to deal with the distraction of having Doughty’s negotiations being the lead story.

While Lombardi is confident they’ll get something done and Doughty will be a King for a long time, the bumps in the road that are these negotiations are serving to provide more negative feelings than positive ones. Here’s to hoping both sides will find peace soon as the Kings could prove to be one of the more special teams this season.