Tag: diving

Kesler Dive

Campbell: NHLers want to “embarrass” divers, distribute list league wide


Following the commencement of the NHL’s Rule Enforcement Meetings, Senior Executive Vice President Colin Campbell highlighted one of the key developments from the two-day affair:

Players want to eliminate diving. Big time.

Here’s the skinny from Dan Rosen of NHL.com:

The players in the session, including Ottawa center Jason Spezza, Vancouver defenseman Kevin Bieksa and Toronto defenseman John-Michael Liles, led an impassioned discussion on enforcing the diving/embellishment rule (Rule 64.1), Campbell told NHL.com. He said the players want to distribute a list of divers around the League so it can be posted in all 30 dressing rooms and be delivered to the on-ice officials.

“They want to get [the list] out there,” Campbell said. “They want the player to be caught, whether it’s on the ice by the referee or by us on video. They are all tired of diving. The object is to make them stop eventually and, by doing that, they can get it out there around the League, embarrass them. The referees will know it, too, so the divers don’t get the benefit of the doubt.”

The “diver’s list” became big news following the last lockout when, early in the 2005-06 season, then-Kings forward Sean Avery blasted Campbell after being placed on the list — one that publicly identified him not just as a diver, but a repeat offender.

Campbell responded to Avery’s criticisms with comments similar to those he made on Wednesday.

“We can tell a dive most of the time,” he said. “We’re just trying to get the emphatic ones and hope that players don’t want to be on a list with their names up in every dressing room.”


Poll: What is your biggest NHL rules pet peeve?

Patrice Bergeron doesn’t know what you’re talking about when it comes to Brad Marchand diving

Brad Marchand

One of the more memorable moments from Game 6 between Boston and Washington was seeing Bruins forward Brad Marchand get run off a play by Capitals forward Jason Chimera. Chimera made glancing contact with Marchand, but Marchand spun out like a cyclone before tumbling to the ice holding his face. Meanwhile, the Capitals headed down the ice where Chimera scored a goal.

Marchand has carved out a poor reputation for exaggerating calls and it’s only gotten worse during this series… But don’t tell Patrice Bergeron that. CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty hears it from Bergeron about how he has no idea where this diving talk is coming from.

“I don’t have anything to say with it to be honest with you,” Patrice Bergeron said. “I didn’t see him dive, but [Brad Marchand] plays the game hard, plays the game with a lot of pride. Last year [Marchand’s play] was a huge reason why we went all the way.  I’m very happy to have him on my side.”

It’s better to have a guy like that on your side than to not as he’s got to be all sorts of irritating to play against. As far as the diving stuff, however, Marchand’s earned his reputation for a reason and all throughout this opening round series he’s found inventive ways to hit the ice. It might be part of his game, but if he winds up costing his team another goal thanks to his antics, it might be time for a sit-down discussion.

According to referees, Erik Karlsson is a diver

Ottawa Senators v Toronto Maple Leafs

There are few things that annoy people around the league more than a player diving. So when an NHL referee tells a coach during the game that one of his players didn’t get a call because he’s a diver, it’s sure to hit a nerve.

In the final minutes of the Ducks tight 2-1 victory over the Ottawa Senators, Ryan Getzlaf reached out with one hand and hit defenseman Erik Karlsson on the leg with his stick. Karlsson when down to the ice and it minimized a Grade A scoring chance with just over a minute left in the game. The Ducks eventually were able to recover the puck after a weak backhand attempt, clear the puck, and ultimately win the game.

The play could have gone either way. We’ve seen far less called tripping this season; yet we’ve seen far more forgiven in the waning minutes of a game. The controversy stems from the comments made from referee Dan O’Rourke to Senators’ head coach Paul MacLean after the play.

“The referee informed us that (Karlsson) was a diver,” MacLean told the media after the game. “We were a little bit disappointed. Erik Karlsson leads the league in points by a defenseman, he’s an elite skater in the league, and, to this point in time, I can never remember him taking a dive. If it’s not a penalty, it’s not a penalty, but I don’t think you should be accusing someone of being a diver. That’s a pretty serious accusation, isn’t it?”

What do you think? Do you think Erik Karlsson has earned the reputation as a diver in the past? More importantly, do you think the on-ice officials should take that into account when a player goes down at the end of the game?

Fire off in the comments…

Video: Milan Lucic and Alex Burrows renew their silly hostilities in Game 5

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five
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After all we saw earlier in this series between Alex Burrows and Milan Lucic in this series after Burrows got away with biting Patrice Bergeron and Lucic taunted Burrows with his fingers, we figured after the league decided to step up in their punishment of taunting that that would be the end of things.

Of course, that’s never how it works in the end and hostilities and acquaintances were renewed in the first period of tonight’s Game 5.

Late in the period during a neutral zone faceoff, Lucic and Burrows jockeyed for position outside of the draw spot. Burrows did his part to incite things by stepping over Lucic’s stick. Lucic then in an effort to get into the play tripped up Burrows causing Burrows to flop to the ice. Lucic was sent to the box for tripping while Burrows got two minutes for diving.

Boys will be boys… We guess.

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Five Thoughts: Breaking down some goodies from Canucks-Sharks Game 1

Henrik Sedin, Daniel Sedin

Now that we’ve got one game of each series under our belts it’s high time we overanalyzed what we saw for both games and panic about what we saw for both losers… Right? OK so we’re not about to do that, but we do have some thoughts about last night.

1. It was quite the juxtaposition for both Vancouver and San Jose last night. One team was overly rested up while the other was still working off the hangover of a grueling seven game series. The game played out pretty much the way you’d figure. Both teams came out cautious but full of energy but as the game wore down, the Sharks got tired and Vancouver took over. I doubt the rest of the series will play out similarly but this first game was one that Vancouver had to lock down in retrospect. Not beating San Jose while they were gassed would’ve been a very bad omen for Vancouver.

Instead, Vancouver gets their “gimmie” game and in comeback manner too. San Jose will be thankful to get the extra day off between Games 1 and 2 and they’ll be better prepared in Game 2 on Wednesday night.

2. Seeing the Sedin twins get things going in Game 1 was a great sign for Vancouver and very much expected to see. While San Jose is a great team, they’re not as defensively dedicated as the Nashville Predators were. The Preds made it their mission to shutdown the twins and they followed through with that with such zeal it’s a point of pride for them. San Jose isn’t going to lock in on them the same way, however.

I know that sounds like the Sharks will have problems with Henrik and Daniel if they do things that way, but the Sharks have their own sets of scorers and playmakers the Canucks will have to deal with as well. Everyone is going to get their opportunities to swing the series and it’s just a matter of cashing in on them. It just turned out that everyone we pointed to that had something to prove in these finals all came through in Game 1.

3. I’m sure we were all a bit relieved to see Maxim Lapierre get busted for diving late in the third period while trying to sell a Dan Boyle holding penalty. Vancouver’s been guilty of diving more than a few times throughout the playoffs and got away with it. Lapierre’s over-exaggerated sell job on a hold was both egregious and embarrassing. After all, if you’re being held, you don’t pirouette and fall to the ice.

It’s worth watching to see how both teams do with the diving as we’ve seen the Sharks pull off some fakery of their own throughout the playoffs. Let’s hope this doesn’t turn into an Italian soccer game with flops all over the ice to draw a call. This is one time where we’re OK with Colin Campbell flexing his authority if need be.

4. One thing the Sharks should be concerned about is that sagging third period. Sure, they came into last night’s game off a brutal series with Detroit and had just a couple days to prep for Vancouver, but this was their fourth straight bad third period effort going back to Game 5 against Detroit. It’s more than a trend right now for the Sharks and that slow, plodding effort has to change or else Vancouver is going to roll them out of the playoffs. Early intensity is great and putting opponents in that uncomfortable spot of having to fight back in games is good, but getting blitzed like that in the third period is no good.

5. If there was a team that has more questions to answer after their Game 1 loss it’s the Boston Bruins. While both the Bruins and Sharks showed some signs of things that could be worries further on in the playoffs, the way the Bruins were disposed of in Game 1 gives us more reason to be concerned for them. While its admirable that Claude Julien wanted to stick to his gameplan through Game 1, not adjusting to what Tampa Bay was throwing at them was the wrong call to make.

Yes, that three goal attack in the first period put them on their heels and changed the complexion of the game, but the Bruins didn’t generate anything else the rest of the way outside of what Tyler Seguin helped them do in his limited time on the ice. The Bruins will be better prepared tomorrow night in Game 2, but if Tampa Bay throws them any more curveballs, we worry that the Bruins will be stuck scrambling the rest of the series.