Tag: diving accusations

Dave Tippett

Dave Tippett steps away from the diving talk


When the Coyotes were humbled in Game 3 against Los Angeles, the big talk afterwards came from Phoenix coach Dave Tippett. Tippett seemed to accuse the Kings of embellishing hits to draw calls and with his team down 3-0 in the series and frustrated, it came off looking poorly.

In talking to the media a day later, Tippett cooled his talk about diving saying it’s something that’s been going on all playoffs. Rich Hammond of L.A. Kings Insider has the word from Tippett.

“I said my piece on embellishment. It wasn’t geared toward that game last night,” Tippett said. “I talked about this from the start of the year. So I’ve said my piece on that.”

Embellishment isn’t something you hear many coaches talk about and, according to Hammond, Tippett isn’t one of them as he points out Tippett hasn’t been quoted about diving this season (according to the ole’ Google search). That diving talk comes up now with his team’s back against the wall isn’t surprising as you try to get any and every edge you can.

That said, if diving calls are going to be made like the call against Dustin Brown in Game 2 after he was maliciously hacked in the leg by goalie Mike Smith, maybe we’re better off not seeing those calls made at all.

Kevin Bieksa tells Canucks teammates to lay off diving

Nashville Predators v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

There’s been plenty of talk of diving throughout the playoffs and one of the teams being accused of doing it the most are the Vancouver Canucks. After all, we’ve seen some hearty theatrics from the Sedins against Chicago and even Ryan Kesler has come under fire from the Predators this round for doing more of the same.

With all the talk of diving going on not just in this series but all through the playoffs and with NHL disciplinarian Colin Campbell speaking out about the prevalence of diving and asking that officials crack down on it, some Canucks players are taking note of what’s going on.

Defenseman Kevin Bieksa spoke up a bit about things and realizes that his team is playing with fire when it comes to some of the on-ice theatrics and he’s hoping that his teammates are taking note of the big words coming out of the NHL front office.

“I know guys will do whatever it takes for a power play to win a game,” Bieksa said. “But sometimes they’re crossing that line of integrity. I think for the better of the game, for the good of the game we need people to stay on that line and not cross it, and not dive and exaggerate for calls.”

Oddly enough, Bieksa says this and says that he’s not so much worried about the call being made saying that it’s up to the referees to call it, he just wants the game to have some integrity.

“It’s not cheating,” Bieksa said. “It’s within the rules and if the referee wants to assess it, he can penalize you for it.

“It’s not cheating but it is a matter of integrity.”

OK… Sure.

With Campbell saying that the call for diving should be made more often when it’s spotted, Bieksa should be worried about the actions of his teammates so they don’t start giving away power plays or ruining opportunities for their own man advantage. We’d like to see the diving cut out because, mostly, hockey fans like to think of their game as being “above” that. Fact is, there’s a long history of exaggerators and fakers all throughout recent history. It doesn’t make us respect them any more, but the fact that they’ve been able to succeed in spite of their “gamesmanship” says something.

That said, some of the nonsense we’ve seen from the Sedins as well as from other Canucks and Joe Thornton as well is laughable. Time to man up and play hard and leave the acting for the offseason endeavors.

Barry Trotz critical of officiating with kindness, Canucks deny diving allegations

Barry Trotz, Marc Joannette

During these playoffs we’ve seen plenty of coaches try to work their verbal magic to get referees to make calls bend more to their team’s will. We saw both John Tortorella and Bruce Boudreau do it in the first round against each other. We saw Lindy Ruff get a bit uptight about things in dealing with the Flyers and now we’ve got a new challenger with a different approach.

Predators coach Barry Trotz is still a bit steamed over a couple of calls that went against his team in Game 3. Jerred Smithson drew a high sticking call against him after he seemingly caught Roberto Luongo in the head with his stick (it certainly didn’t look that way). Meanwhile, Shea Weber’s hooking penalty to Ryan Kesler in overtime led to Vancouver cashing in on the power play and winning the game. In each case it was thought to be a bit embellished (Luongo’s certainly seemed that way) and Trotz isn’t too pleased with that.

Instead of raising a huge stink and lambasting the officiating, he’s trying to take them out a whole new door by killing both the referees and Canucks with kindness.

“That’s gamesmanship, and I understand that,” Trotz said Wednesday. “It’s also a little bit putting the referee in a tough spot. We have the best referees. If you’re going to make them look bad, I don’t think that’s needed in the game.”

Well that’s a new way to go at it. Nice reverse psychology there.

The Canucks, of course, are denying any and all allegations right away with Luongo’s theory appearing to be quite silly.

Luongo said the complaints are part of hockey. The goalie said there was contact with his mask, even though the stick doesn’t appear to hit Luongo’s mask on replays.

“I just turned my head. I mean I didn’t throw myself on the floor or anything like that,” Luongo said. “You can ask Smithson. He did make contact with my head.”

Kesler denied any acting on his part to draw the hooking call.

“That’s the rule. I mean, you get your stick parallel to the ice, and it was in my gut. Obviously, he was impeding my progress. That’s the right call. I don’t make the calls, so it’s not my job,” Kesler said.

Oh the drama. Getting this sort of excitement off the ice should help make Game 4 much more difficult to play on it. You know the Predators and Shea Weber are going to come at you with everything they have to make Game 4 a winner for the Predators. Vancouver had best prepare for anything in Nashville but the Predators want the game to be 60 minutes of hell. Of course, Vancouver has been doing irksome things like this all throughout the playoffs. Whether its’ one of the Sedin twins dropping to the ice to draw a call or Luongo’s theatrics, the Canucks are happy to keep trying to get the calls in loathsome ways.

Trotz has to fight fire with fire here which means going through the media. It’s a smart move and it gets officials to keep an eye out for it, all teh better. Getting the benefit of the calls from the referees never hurts. Maybe if this didn’t work out Trotz can leave a fruit basket in the officials’ locker room.

Ducks GM Bob Murray: “We have to start diving”

Bob Murray

Finding a way to get an edge in the playoffs can be tricky. Finding ways to take heat off your team after a tough loss or if they’re struggling in the series can get really creative. While Caps coach Bruce Boudreau decided to go after Madison Square Garden earlier today to get some of the heat off the Caps, Anaheim Ducks GM Bob Murray found a more direct way to vent his thoughts and take the heat off his team.

With the Ducks are down 2-1 in their series with Nashville and Murray feels that the Predators are getting a bit too much of the benefit of the calls and he’s got a fascinating solution for his team. Rather than have coach Randy Carlyle work more on the team’s penalty kill, he’s saying that the Ducks should be diving more to get the calls. After a pair of calls in Game 3 that went against the Ducks thanks to a high stick by Brad Winchester on Jerred Smithson and a hooking call on Saku Koivu against Jonathon Blum, Murray’s had enough.

Eric Stephens of the Orange County Register gets the word from Murray about how the Ducks should be taking more nods from Hollywood in how to win games.

“It’s become a tactic,” he told the Register, speaking at the team’s hotel. ”I’ve watched enough. First things first. We have to have less passengers. We have too many passengers right now. But when you’re playing a game and [there’s] a constant stream to the penalty box because these guys are diving left and right … we have to start diving.

“I’d never thought I’d say this to my hockey team. We’ve got to start diving because it’s working. It is working. They’re getting power plays because of the diving. I can go through the list of players. You already know who they are. You’ve seen them. It’s ridiculous.”

Well this is a curious tactic, especially coming from the GM of one of the league’s most penalized teams. Anaheim was the fifth most penalized team in the NHL this season and it’s a designation they’ve held for the last few seasons. Last year they were third most and two seasons ago they were the second most penalized team in the league.

That’s not to say that the calls Murray is taking umbrage with aren’t worthy of scrutiny, it’s just that he has to be careful when filing his complaints because the Ducks certainly do enough on the ice to warrant action. Seeing a coach lobby for more calls to be made against the opponent is nothing new, just that saying your team has to do more objectionable stuff to get the calls you want is a curious way to go about it.

We’ll find out how well this campaign for and against embellishment goes soon enough as Game 4 between these two comes up on Wednesday night. The less calls that are made might not be too helpful for Anaheim as their power play has done well against Nashville. Turning things into a slugfest might not work out too well for them either.