Tag: Detroit Red Wings


Sheahan on playing for Blashill: ‘Guys will be a little bit more confident’


Riley Sheahan believes his teammates’ familiarity with Jeff Blashill will help ease the transition for the rookie head coach in Detroit this season.

Sheahan is one of a number of players on the current Red Wings’ roster that played under Blashill with the AHL’s Grand Rapids Griffins.

“You can see the job that he’s done in Grand Rapids and so many of us have played there and played with him, especially the Calder Cup team,” Sheahan told the team’s website. “He’s had so much success everywhere that he’s gone, so I think all of the guys are pretty happy.

“The guys that played with him before know how he reacts to different situations and knows what he expects. I think in that way some guys will be a little bit more confident, which always helps. It’s definitely a good thing.”

Blashill was named the 27th head coach in Wings’ history back in June. The 41-year-old led the Griffins to a 134-71-23 record in three seasons winning a Calder Cup in 2013.

Sheahan, who scored 13 goals and 36 points in 79 games in his first full season with the Wings last year, doesn’t expect much to change systems-wise with Blashill taking over from Mike Babcock.

“I actually thought they were really similar,” Sheahan said. “The system is pretty similar, there are a few tweaks here and there, but I think obviously, Babs leaving that’s tough to deal (with). He’s such a good coach, but Blash coming in, I think there’s a lot of positivity and a lot of happiness with the guys.”

Related: Under Pressure: Jeff Blashill

Vancouver Canucks ’15-16 Outlook


It was another eventful offseason in Vancouver, the second under GM Jim Benning, and it left both fans and media asking the same question:

What exactly are the Canucks doing?

To hear Benning explain it, the plan is simple in theory, yet difficult to execute — rebuild while staying competitive, giving young players a winning environment in which to grow.

“From the time I took the job (14 months ago) until 10 days ago, I went at it hard,” Benning explained, per the Vancouver Sun. “It hasn’t been easy. I’ll admit it — it’s been hard. I’ve had to make hard decisions to try to remain competitive while building for the future. It’s not an easy thing to do.”

“But for the most part, we’ve been able to accomplish that this summer.”

Some will argue with that last remark.

This summer, Benning took heat for a variety of his moves, most notably his trade of popular (and relatively successful) backup goalie Eddie Lack to Carolina for a third-round pick, which many saw as a middling return. After tiring of the Zack Kassian experiment, the Canucks cut bait and got what they could in exchange — 31-year-old Habs tough guy Brandon Prust — then paid a tidy sum to acquire third-line Pittsburgh center Brandon Sutter, paying him an even tidier sum to be their second-line center ($21.875 million over five years, specifically).

In the end, it’s tough to say the Canucks got any better this summer. It’s tough to say they stayed even. Most say they got worse.

And that makes next year’s outlook kinda bleak.

Sure, the same old suspects remain — the Sedins, Alex Burrows, Radim Vrbata, Chris Higgins, Jannik Hansen, Dan Hamhuis and Alex Edler — but they’re all a year older, and now surrounded by kids. Bo Horvat, 20, projects to be the No. 3 center while winger Sven Baertschi, 22, will get a shot at the top-six. Former first-round pick Jake Virtanen (18) figures to get a long look in training camp, and Frank Corrado (22) will likely be in on defense. Other prospects like Hunter Shinkaruk, Nicklas Jensen, Brendan Gaunce and Jared McCann could all get looks, too.

Which makes for an odd dynamic, especially since the Canucks were competitive last year, registering 101 points and a playoff spot. But their opening-round loss to Calgary only confirmed what most suspected — Vancouver was a flawed team, nowhere close to contending.

Now, the club heads into this season minus the services of veteran contributors like Kevin Bieksa, Shawn Matthias and Brad Richardson — jobs that will be filled by (the aforementioned) inexperienced players. And should injuries strike the team’s aging core, it could be grim; at no position is this more concerning than in goal, where 35-year-old Ryan Miller, who missed extensive time with a knee injury last season, is backed up by a total wildcard in Jacob Markstrom.

Oh, and lest we forget, the Canucks play in a tough Pacific Division in which the Ducks, Kings, Flames and Oilers all made significant upgrades this summer.

If you believe Benning, though, his moves weren’t designed to make the Canucks less competitive.

The way he sees it, the club is more versatile than ever.

“What we’re trying to do is build a team that can play whatever style the game dictates,” he explained. “So we’ve made some changes this summer. I thought maybe in the playoffs we didn’t play with the intensity and emotion to step up in a playoff series and win.

“We’ve got some good, young, skill players coming up. But we want to surround them with players who fit.”

Under Pressure: Mike Babcock

Mike Babcock

When you’re the highest-paid coach in the history of the league, there’s going to be pressure.

When you take over the most valuable team in the league, there’s going to be pressure.

When you go to work under the most media scrutiny in the league, well, you get the point.

Mike Babcock is fully aware that the Toronto Maple Leafs represent the biggest challenge of his career.

“Whether you believe it or not, I believe this is Canada’s team, and we need to put Canada’s team back on the map,” he said upon his much-ballyhooed hiring.

“I love to win. I have a burning desire to win.”

Smartly, he also bought himself some time to accomplish that goal.

“If you think there’s no pain coming, there’s pain coming,” he said. “This is going to be a long process. This is going to be a massive, massive challenge.”

So it’s not like the Leafs have to compete for a Stanley Cup next year. They don’t even have to make the playoffs.

But there has to be some semblance of progress, whether it’s from younger players like Morgan Rielly, Nazem Kadri and Jake Gardiner, or simply in terms of how the Leafs go about their business.

“Anything that’s been going on is going to get cleaned up,” Babcock vowed at the draft. “We’re going to be a fit, fit team. We’re going to be a team that comes to the media everyday, after a win, after a loss, after practice, and owns their own stuff. Period.”

In other words, the Leafs can’t be a big ol’ tire fire again.

And remember, even with a Stanley Cup and a pair of Olympic gold medals on his coaching resume, Babcock still has his doubters. Not that he’s a good coach — pretty much everyone agrees that he’s a good coach — but that he’s as good as advertised.

The doubters point to the Red Wings team he won with in 2008, headlined by Nicklas Lidstrom, Pavel Datsyuk, and Henrik Zetterberg. They point to the loaded 2010 and 2014 editions of Team Canada. They say those teams could’ve won with just about any half-decent coach behind the bench.

And let’s face it, they’ve kind of got a point.

But if he can win with the Leafs?

“I’d like to be the best coach in my generation,” Babcock said in a magazine profile before he took the job in Toronto.

That’s pressure.

Red Wings ’15-16 Outlook

Detroit Red Wings v Buffalo Sabres

For a franchise associated almost as much with consistency as it is with excellence, this has been a tumultuous offseason for the Detroit Red Wings.

After a decade of scowls and strong coaching, Mike Babcock fled for Toronto, prompting the Red Wings to hand the keys to Jeff Blashill. Forecasting the impact of such a change is difficult, but Blashill will certainly be under pressure.

The winds of change swept through the roster, too. The team finally swept away the error of adding Stephen Weiss by buying him out. Mike Green provides a big upgrade in the “right-handed offensive defenseman” category over Marek Zidlicky, while GM Ken Holland also added some veteran skill by signing Brad Richards.

Bolstering a competitive lineup with some useful free agents provides some reason for optimism. Pessimists will linger on questions of health, however.

Most obviously, Pavel Datsyuk is expected to miss at least the first month of the 2015-16 season, and it’s plausible that such a situation would be a best-case scenario. Johan Franzen’s career also appears to be in limbo, as he may functionally retire.

The Red Wings often go as far as Datsyuk and Henrik Zetterberg can take them, but injuries have really saddled those world-class workhorses.

There’s been a silver lining to the unfortunate injury issues for Detroit’s dynamic duo: players like Gustav Nyquist received a little extra room to spread their wings. Key players on the Red Wings roster now have a decent amount of experience absorbing heightened roles, so the shock of starting 2015-16 without Datsyuk should at least be tempered a bit.

Goaltending is a question, at least as far as determining if the majority of starts go to Jimmy Howard or Petr Mrazek. There’s also maybe a bit more age on the blueline than some may want (Green’s one of the younger defensemen, and he’s already 29).

All things considered, it seems like the Red Wings may settle into a reality that once seemed unthinkable: scratching and clawing for a playoff spot rather than cruising in.

That said, if you’d like to weigh in on Detroit’s chances of making the playoffs for a 25th consecutive season, vote in the poll here.

Poll: Can Detroit make it 25 straight playoff runs?

Tampa Bay Lightning, Detroit Red Wings

Many Detroit Red Wings fans roll their eyes whenever someone wonders if “this will be the year” their playoff streak ends, but isn’t that the nature of the beast?

It’s a pretty nice problem for a sports fan to have, at least.

While the situation got dicey at times, the Red Wings made it to the playoffs for a staggering 24th straight season in 2014-15. It’s true that they were bounced in the first round, yet the Tampa Bay Lightning struggled to dispatch them in seven games.

The “will they miss it this time?” question seems especially relevant this time around, however, as Mike Babcock’s decade-long run of excellence is now over. New head coach Jeff Blashill has some huge shoes to fill, even with some intriguing additions in Mike Green and Brad Richards.

So, what do you think? Will the Red Wings pull off 25 straight trips to the postseason?