Tag: Dennis Seidenberg

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

Sweeney vows to return ‘aggressiveness’ to Bruins


Cam Neely spoke last month about the big, bad “identity” of the Boston Bruins, and how getting away from that identity had made them not as “tough to play against as we’d like to be.”

And so it was no surprise when new general manager Don Sweeney, flanked by Neely, spoke today about getting back to that identity, in hopes of returning to the playoffs and competing for a Stanley Cup.

“We’re not as far away as people may think,” Sweeney said. “We have to get back, a little bit, the aggressiveness that was lost in our group.”

Sweeney suggested that the Bruins, having won the Stanley Cup in 2011 and gone to the finals in 2013, had grown “stagnant” or overly “comfortable” with their mix.

Not anymore, he promised.

“There will be some changes going forward,” he said. “There will be personnel changes. There will be staff member changes.”

On that note, Sweeney did not commit to keeping head coach Claude Julien.

“I have some things that I want to sit down with Claude and go through in a very orderly fashion, as to where I think things need to change, and what direction we need to change as a group,” said Sweeney.

“So it’s just about lining up philosophical approaches that I believe in, that he believes in, and that we can move the group forward.”

Sweeney, the longtime Bruins defenseman who’s been in the front office since 2006, was asked about the importance of returning to the “style” that people have come to expect from the organization.

“I think it’s incredibly important,” he said. “It’s one thing to throw the words ‘culture’ and ‘identity’ around, it’s another to live it, breathe it, and teach it.”

Of course, it’s still another thing to assemble the players to be successful with that style.

Or any style, really.

Because the Bruins did not win the Stanley Cup in 2011 by aggression alone. To suggest they did would be to ignore the actual hockey-playing performances they received from the likes of Tim Thomas, Zdeno Chara, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron, Milan Lucic, Brad Marchand, Dennis Seidenberg, Johnny Boychuk, Nathan Horton, Mark Recchi, and the list goes on.

That team, big and bad as it was, had a lot more than toughness going for it. An elite goalie. An elite defenseman, still in his prime. An elite two-way center. A scoring center. Depth on defense. Four lines that all contributed. Energetic youngsters. Veteran leaders. And on top of all that, the Bruins stayed relatively healthy through 25 hard-fought playoff games.

The 2014-15 roster still had some of those things. But it did not have all of those things.

Conceded Sweeney: “I think it would’ve taken a lot of things to fall our way for us to be in a position to challenge this year.”

So…a lot of things on Sweeney’s plate.

That includes throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at tonight’s Boston Red Sox game.

Welcome to the spotlight.

Related: Bruins fire Chiarelli after missing playoffs

PHT Morning Skate: McLellan sought advice from Crosby in prep for McDavid

Canada v Russia - 2015 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship Gold Medal Game

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Before Todd McLellan officially became the Edmonton Oilers’ bench boss and while he was still coaching Team Canada in the 2015 Worlds, he took it upon himself to pick Sidney Crosby’s brain about what life was like as an 18-year-old superstar so that McLellan would have a better idea of how best to handle Connor McDavid. (Edmonton Sun)

While on the subject of McLellan; he still thinks very highly of the San Jose Sharks. (NHL.com)

Los Angeles Kings director of player personnel Michael Futa opened up on a number of subjects, including the Kings’ offseason outlook and top prospect Adrian Kempe’s transition to North America. (LA Kings Insider)

Here are the highlight’s from Chicago’s triple-overtime victory last night:

New Philadelphia Flyers head coach Dave Hakstol might be able to better communicate with his players about why they’re being scratched or getting less playing time, compared to how Craig Berube did things. (Broad Street Hockey)

NHL Numbers had an interesting piece on the risk and potential reward of draft prospects. (NHL Numbers)

Dennis Seidenberg isn’t sure what the future holds for the Boston Bruins, but he hopes he’ll be able to stay with the team. (CSN New England)

‘I want to stay’ in Boston, says Seidenberg

Boston Bruins v Colorado Avalanche

Last month’s firing of GM Peter Chiarelli made it abundantly clear that, after missing the playoffs, the Boston Bruins are willing to make changes.

Dennis Seidenberg, though, doesn’t want to be one of them.

“I want to stay,” Seidenberg said on Monday night, per CSNNE. “There’s no question about it. I like it here. I like the people. I like the fans, the city.”

Seidenberg, 33, has three years left on a four-year, $16 million deal and is armed with a no-trade clause, so it’s not like he’s entirely movable. But he is a veteran defenseman with a relatively low cap hit, on a Bruins team that might be looking to get younger after a series of missed draft picks. Seidenberg also has a wealth of playoff experience — 69 for his career — which could be enticing for a contending team looking to upgrade on defense; what’s more, the B’s face another summer of salary cap limbo with new deals required for RFAs Dougie Hamilton, Brent Connolly and Ryan Spooner.

And, of course, missing the playoffs still looms over the entire organization.

“Some organizations are less patient than others,” Seidenberg said, in referencing trade rumors. “You never know. You really don’t know. You’ll just see what happens.

“People expect big things from you, and if you don’t bring it then they’re on you.”