Tag: Dennis Seidenberg

Boston Bruins v Tampa Bay Lightning

McQuaid camp ‘holding out hope’ to re-sign with Bruins


New Bruins GM Don Sweeney has some decisions to make on the blue line.

As of now, the B’s only have four of their defensemen from the past season under contract: Zdeno Chara, Dennis Seidenberg, Torey Krug, and Kevan Miller. They have one big restricted free agent to sign in Dougie Hamilton, but that’s expected to get done somehow.

One of their unrestricted free agents is Adam McQuaid. The 28-year-old said last month he “can’t picture” moving on from Boston. But that may not be his call.

“We’re holding out hope [to get something done],” McQuaid’s agent, Paul Krepelka, tells CSNNE.com. “He’s a good fit here [in Boston].”

The other UFA on defense is Matt Bartkowski, who just so happened to be the subject of a speculative piece in today’s Vancouver Province. (The Canucks are, of course, led by GM Jim Benning, who knows Bartkowski well from his time in Boston.)

But it’s McQuaid that has the larger history with the B’s. He was a young depth defenseman on the 2011 Stanley Cup champion team, providing size and toughness behind an excellent top four of Chara, Seidenberg, Johnny Boychuk, and Andrew Ference. He played a similar role in 2013, when the B’s lost to Chicago in the final.

McQuaid is the kind of player that would seem to match the Bruins’ plans to get back to their aggressive ways. On the other hand, after being asked to play a larger role this season following the departure of Boychuk, he definitely had his struggles.

It begs the question — if the B’s choose to bring him back, what role do they envision him playing? Because the top four may be too big of an ask.

“I guess time will tell,” McQuaid said in April. “I’ll wait and see if it comes to [hitting free agency], and then obviously you have to go down that avenue.”

Sweeney vows to return ‘aggressiveness’ to Bruins

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

Cam Neely spoke last month about the big, bad “identity” of the Boston Bruins, and how getting away from that identity had made them not as “tough to play against as we’d like to be.”

And so it was no surprise when new general manager Don Sweeney, flanked by Neely, spoke today about getting back to that identity, in hopes of returning to the playoffs and competing for a Stanley Cup.

“We’re not as far away as people may think,” Sweeney said. “We have to get back, a little bit, the aggressiveness that was lost in our group.”

Sweeney suggested that the Bruins, having won the Stanley Cup in 2011 and gone to the finals in 2013, had grown “stagnant” or overly “comfortable” with their mix.

Not anymore, he promised.

“There will be some changes going forward,” he said. “There will be personnel changes. There will be staff member changes.”

On that note, Sweeney did not commit to keeping head coach Claude Julien.

“I have some things that I want to sit down with Claude and go through in a very orderly fashion, as to where I think things need to change, and what direction we need to change as a group,” said Sweeney.

“So it’s just about lining up philosophical approaches that I believe in, that he believes in, and that we can move the group forward.”

Sweeney, the longtime Bruins defenseman who’s been in the front office since 2006, was asked about the importance of returning to the “style” that people have come to expect from the organization.

“I think it’s incredibly important,” he said. “It’s one thing to throw the words ‘culture’ and ‘identity’ around, it’s another to live it, breathe it, and teach it.”

Of course, it’s still another thing to assemble the players to be successful with that style.

Or any style, really.

Because the Bruins did not win the Stanley Cup in 2011 by aggression alone. To suggest they did would be to ignore the actual hockey-playing performances they received from the likes of Tim Thomas, Zdeno Chara, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron, Milan Lucic, Brad Marchand, Dennis Seidenberg, Johnny Boychuk, Nathan Horton, Mark Recchi, and the list goes on.

That team, big and bad as it was, had a lot more than toughness going for it. An elite goalie. An elite defenseman, still in his prime. An elite two-way center. A scoring center. Depth on defense. Four lines that all contributed. Energetic youngsters. Veteran leaders. And on top of all that, the Bruins stayed relatively healthy through 25 hard-fought playoff games.

The 2014-15 roster still had some of those things. But it did not have all of those things.

Conceded Sweeney: “I think it would’ve taken a lot of things to fall our way for us to be in a position to challenge this year.”

So…a lot of things on Sweeney’s plate.

That includes throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at tonight’s Boston Red Sox game.

Welcome to the spotlight.

Related: Bruins fire Chiarelli after missing playoffs

PHT Morning Skate: McLellan sought advice from Crosby in prep for McDavid

Canada v Russia - 2015 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship Gold Medal Game

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Before Todd McLellan officially became the Edmonton Oilers’ bench boss and while he was still coaching Team Canada in the 2015 Worlds, he took it upon himself to pick Sidney Crosby’s brain about what life was like as an 18-year-old superstar so that McLellan would have a better idea of how best to handle Connor McDavid. (Edmonton Sun)

While on the subject of McLellan; he still thinks very highly of the San Jose Sharks. (NHL.com)

Los Angeles Kings director of player personnel Michael Futa opened up on a number of subjects, including the Kings’ offseason outlook and top prospect Adrian Kempe’s transition to North America. (LA Kings Insider)

Here are the highlight’s from Chicago’s triple-overtime victory last night:

New Philadelphia Flyers head coach Dave Hakstol might be able to better communicate with his players about why they’re being scratched or getting less playing time, compared to how Craig Berube did things. (Broad Street Hockey)

NHL Numbers had an interesting piece on the risk and potential reward of draft prospects. (NHL Numbers)

Dennis Seidenberg isn’t sure what the future holds for the Boston Bruins, but he hopes he’ll be able to stay with the team. (CSN New England)

‘I want to stay’ in Boston, says Seidenberg

Boston Bruins v Colorado Avalanche

Last month’s firing of GM Peter Chiarelli made it abundantly clear that, after missing the playoffs, the Boston Bruins are willing to make changes.

Dennis Seidenberg, though, doesn’t want to be one of them.

“I want to stay,” Seidenberg said on Monday night, per CSNNE. “There’s no question about it. I like it here. I like the people. I like the fans, the city.”

Seidenberg, 33, has three years left on a four-year, $16 million deal and is armed with a no-trade clause, so it’s not like he’s entirely movable. But he is a veteran defenseman with a relatively low cap hit, on a Bruins team that might be looking to get younger after a series of missed draft picks. Seidenberg also has a wealth of playoff experience — 69 for his career — which could be enticing for a contending team looking to upgrade on defense; what’s more, the B’s face another summer of salary cap limbo with new deals required for RFAs Dougie Hamilton, Brent Connolly and Ryan Spooner.

And, of course, missing the playoffs still looms over the entire organization.

“Some organizations are less patient than others,” Seidenberg said, in referencing trade rumors. “You never know. You really don’t know. You’ll just see what happens.

“People expect big things from you, and if you don’t bring it then they’re on you.”

Farewell, Merlot: Bruins parting ways with Paille, Campbell

Carolina Hurricanes v Boston Bruins

The Merlot Line has officially been put out to vineyard.

On Monday, Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli announced that UFA forwards Daniel Paille and Gregory Campbell — who, along with the already departed Shawn Thornton, once formed Boston’s popular fourth line — wouldn’t be re-signed this summer.

Paille, 30, has been the Bruins since 2009 and achieved some good success, emerging as a useful contributor during the 2011 Stanley Cup victory and the ’13 Finals appearance (Paille scored four goals and nine points during that latter run, averaging 12:32 TOI per night.)

Campbell, 31, spent the last five years in Boston. A gritty checking forward, he forever etched himself in Bruins lore with this shift against Pittsburgh in the ’13 Eastern Conference Final — in which he played on a broken leg:

This year, though, Campbell and Paille struggled. They were two of the club’s worst forwards in terms of possession (click here) and neither produced much offensively; Campbell scored just six goals in 70 games while Paille had six in 71.

In the wake of Boston missing the playoffs for the first time in eight years, Paille and Campbell aren’t expected to be the only changes — but their departures are still significant. Aside from being the first (and, speediest) moves by Chiarelli this offseason, the two veterans contributed largely to Boston’s identity over the last five years.

Now that they’re gone, only a handful of regulars remain from the Cup-winning team: Zdeno Chara, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand, Dennis Seidenberg, Adam McQuaid and Milan Lucic — the latter of whom has already seen his name appear in trade speculation.