Tag: decibel readings

Adam McQuaid; Raffi Torres

Boston’s Game 3 crowd was louder than Rogers Arena in Game 2

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We compared the highest levels of noise at Vancouver’s Rogers Arena in Game 2 to the peaks for Chicago and Philadelphia in the 2010 Stanley Cup finals, but that doesn’t seem totally fair to Canucks fans. With Game 3 at Boston’s TD Banknorth Garden in the books, it might be more interesting to compare NHL.com’s Decibel Meter readings from the two contests.

Before we compare and contrast the two arena’s peak levels, there are two things we should keep in mind. First, here are some numbers regarding what these numbers mean.

Level at which sustained exposure may result in hearing loss:      90 – 95dB
Pain begins:     
125dB
Loudest recommended exposure WITH hearing protection:      
140dB
Loudest sound possible:      
194dB

Secondly, some might find the arena’s hockey capacities to be relevant. According to NBC Box Score numbers, Rogers Arena packed in 18,860 people in a Game 2 sell-out while TD Banknorth Garden attracted its own capacity crowd of 17,565 during Game 3.

Now that we got those two things out of the way, let’s get to some of the loudest moments during Boston’s Game 3. You can check out all of them here.

Cam Neely introduced as honorary captain during pre-game ceremony – 107dB (like a Power saw)
Andrew Ference scores 11 seconds into second period – 117dB (Loud rock concert)
Brad Marchand scores that 3-0 shorthanded goal – 118dB (Loud rock concert)
Krejci’s 4-0 goal late in second – 117dB (Loud rock concert)
Fans cheer during games closing seconds of game – 112dB (Sandblasting)

Now let’s look at some of the highlights from Vancouver’s Game 2.

Pre-game “Manny! (Malhotra) chant: 98dB – like a snowmobile
Malhotra’s first shift, appears on video screen: 108dB – Power saw
Burrows’ first goal: 111dB – Sandblasting
Daniel Sedin‘s tying goal: 114dB – Loud rock concert
Burrows scores the OT winner: 117 dB – Loud rock concert
Fans chant “We Want the Cup” – Snowmobile

While Vancouver’s absolute loudest moment (during the Burrows OT-winner) at 117dB wasn’t far from Boston’s (during Marchand’s shorthanded 3-0 goal) at 118dB, Bruins fans reached those heights more often.

Now, naturally, Bruins fans had that much more to cheer about. Obviously, there was the release that came from seeing their team run away with a big game while they were on the ropes. (Not to mention all of the anger they released toward Burrows.) Eight goals after that hideous Aaron Rome hit on Nathan Horton must have provided a cathartic experience, so we’ll see how Game 4 compares.

That being said, Rogers Arena packs 1,000+ more fans than TD Banknorth Garden, so it’s an impressive feat nonetheless. Regardless of who wins on Wednesday night, Canucks fans will get at least one more chance to top their previous efforts. We’ll keep on our eyes on the results as the Cup finals continue.

Comparing Vancouver noise levels in Stanley Cup finals to Chicago and Philadelphia in 2010

Stanley Cup Bruins Canucks Hockey
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Last year, we followed the competing noise levels between Chicago Blackhawks and Philadelphia Flyers fans during the 2010 Stanley Cup finals. NHL.com is keeping track of the ear-splitting volumes of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals as well, so we thought it would be interesting to follow those trends again.

Before we get into the Decibel Meter readings for Game 2 in Vancouver, NHL.com provides some context about how these sound levels would affect your hearing (and comfort) during a game.

Level at which sustained exposure may result in hearing loss:      90 – 95dB
Pain begins:     
125dB
Loudest recommended exposure WITH hearing protection:      
140dB
Loudest sound possible:      
194dB

Looking at last year’s first four games, Chicago’s crowd hit 121dB and 122dB peaks in their first two home games while Philadelphia hit 114dB and 118dB in Games 3 and 4. While we couldn’t find readings from Game 1 in Vancouver, NHL.com provides some of the highest levels of noise saturation in Game 2. Here are some of the most interesting readings.

Pre-game “Manny! (Malhotra) chant: 98dB – like a snowmobile
Malhotra’s first shift, appears on video screen: 108dB – Power saw
Burrows’ first goal: 111dB – Sandblasting
Daniel Sedin’s tying goal: 114dB – Loud rock concert
Burrows scores the OT winner: 117 dB – Loud rock concert
Fans chant “We Want the Cup” – Snowmobile

Obviously, it became very loud at points in Rogers Arena during Game 2, yet Chicago’s crowd hit higher peaks in both of their games and Philadelphia managed a higher peak in Game 4. That doesn’t mean that they were louder over the long haul, but it might give some credibility to Philly and Chicago as strong hockey markets if they can hang with a Canadian one.

The Canucks crowd’s loudest times provided a stark contrast to some long stretches when it seemed like you could hear a pin drop in Game 2 in Vancouver (or so it seemed on TV, at least). The Vancouver audience seemed substantially subdued when Boston was holding onto a 2-1 lead in the third period, prompting many (myself included) to wonder why they were so rattled when the Canucks were only trailing by a single goal. Obviously, that solemn atmosphere didn’t last forever, especially once Daniel Sedin notched things up by scoring on a yawning net.

It’s quite possible that Vancouver fans were simply terrified that the team might let its best chance to win a first-ever Stanley Cup slip away. That’s an understandable fear and they certainly showed great passion when the Canucks got back into the game (and also showed fantastic spirit when Malhotra completed his courageous comeback).

Please keep in mind that there probably aren’t big differences in these results; ultimately these fan bases are making a ton of noise. That being said, it’s fun to back up (or refute) assumptions about loud crowds with hard numbers. We’ll let you know how the crowds in Boston perform as the Bruins try to fight their way back into this series and we’ll also keep an eye on Vancouver’s crowds if the series stretches to five games or more.