Tag: day with the Stanley Cup

Michael Ryder

Video: Stanley Cup takes a fall on Michael Ryder’s day

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Sure, the Boston Bruins’ Stanley Cup victory was about the “big things” like the all-world play of Tim Thomas, the sizable impact of Zdeno Chara and David Krejci leading the playoffs in scoring. Still, many championship runs are also about those moments when attention to detail pays off, including when Michael Ryder made a glove save of his own during the 2011 playoffs.

Sometimes you underestimate those little things … and sometimes you just underestimate the importance of a sturdy table. As you can see from the video from The Telegram below (H/T to Puck Daddy), Ryder placed the Cup on a table only to see it crash to the ground moments later after the table collapsed. An onlooker joked that it was the Cup’s first “ding of the day,” a reference to the fact that the silver chalice has taken its fair share of blows over the years.

That gaffe might overshadow the rest of Ryder’s day with the Cup, but you can follow along with The Telegram’s updates about his plans here. The ceremony in that video was part of a “send-off” in St. John’s as Ryder is expected to take a helicopter ride to his old stomping grounds at Bonavista for a parade and the bigger part of his celebration. Hopefully the Cup won’t take any more abuse in that process …

Ryder won’t have a chance to do a better job of protecting the Cup with the Bruins next season because he signed with the Dallas Stars as a free agent. One can assume that the Stars hope he’ll be a little luckier there than he was this morning.

Tim Thomas inspires hope during his day with the Cup

The 2011 ESPY Awards - Press Room

Leave it to Tim Thomas to have an inspirational, uplifting moment—even on a day when he’s celebrating with the Stanley Cup. Wouldn’t you know it, that Thomas would have the type of celebration that mirrored so much of his career? There have been plenty of parties surrounding the Bruins and the Stanley Cup this summer, but Thomas’ celebration was set on a Michigan football field at his former high school talking to friends and family about his humble roots.

Somehow, I don’t think Brad Marchand was rapping “Black and Yellow” at Cardinal Stadium.

While speaking at his alma mater, he talked about how playing various sports throughout his development effected him over the course of his career. Some guys are solely playing hockey from the moment they can skate, but Thomas was a three-sport athlete at Davison High School. What is it that they say about the “road less traveled?”

“At times early in my career I wondered if that slowed down my path to hopefully the NHL, but looking back it was definitely the right decision. I was able to enjoy those years and play different sports. If anything it developed my love for hockey because it made me realize I loved hockey more than the other sports. Maybe that’s the reason I’m not burned out now at 37.”

He went onto talk about the area that inspired his work ethic—the type of dedication that helped him navigate through the twists and turns of hockey in the minors and overseas. It’s cliché, but it was his environment growing up that cultivated the perseverance that Thomas would depend on throughout his professional career. From Nicholas J. Cotsonika’s excellent story on Yahoo! Sports:

“I think the Midwest work ethic was highly instilled in me growing up. I was also taught that if you want something bad enough and you’re willing to work towards it that you can get it. It’s kind of the American dream, so to speak, which I think a lot of people, actually, to be honest, have kind of given up on. But I’m proof that you still can. If there’s anything that the younger generation that’s watching here today takes out of it, it’s that it’s up to you.”

After sharing the story, Thomas went deeper after the event with Craig Custance and reflected on the bigger picture:

“It’s not the easiest of times, let’s be honest, in the United States right now. There’s high unemployment in the younger generation. I think they need hope… they need to be inspired.”

There are plenty of ways people can take Tim Thomas’ day with the Cup. Some will read into the story with political motives, as they look at an area that has been hit hard by the tumbling economy. Some will take his message with personal meaning, as they push through tough times in their own individual lives. Still others will listen to Thomas’ words and will find the inspiration to chase their dreams—even when they seem impossible. For those people, Thomas’ cousin Susan Danner shared in Custance’s story that her cousin should be providing motivation for the people who need to be inspired.  “We know how hard he worked,” Danner said.  “Anybody who doesn’t believe in patience, there’s a true story of patience.”

Thank you for the feel good story of the offseason.

Vancouver angst could sully Milan Lucic’s day with the Stanley Cup

Boston Bruins Victory Parade

In the grand scheme of things, it’s important not to throw the entire city of Vancouver under the bus for the riots and all the bad moments that came from the Canucks’ Game 7 loss in the 2011 Stanley Cup finals. The northwest haven’s better side showed itself in a heartwarming way when its kindest residents volunteered to help clean up the mess left behind by the ugly riots.

That being said, those riots and much of the ugliness that lingers will probably make it tough for unbiased fans to root for the team – in fact, those awful antics make Maxim Lapierre’s shenanigans seem quaint. Puck Daddy points to a saddening story in the Vancouver Courier that reveals Vancouver native Milan Lucic’s decision to make his day with the Stanley Cup a low-key affair to avoid bitter Canucks fans.

Megan Stewart reports that posters of the Boston Bruins winger were defaced around town, with his eyes “poked out” and his face “scribbled on.” Stewart also reports that his presence might have lead to some fistfights during a Greek festival last month.

Again, it’s not fair to cast blame on every Vancouver fan/resident because of some knuckleheads, but these stories show how “passion” can mutate into thuggery. For that reason, the Lucic celebration will be subdued (or at least private).

When he celebrates with the Stanley Cup this weekend, Lucic will keep the festivities relatively private and low-key. He won’t be gloating, at least where the public eye can see. Potential to bring hockey’s holy grail to Kitsilano Beach Park for the weekend’s popular sports festival, Kits Fest, were scuttled, according to an event organizer.

All because of a few sore losers. Seeing Lucic with the Stanley Cup would be bittersweet for Canucks Nation, just as it must be acutely bittersweet for him to keep in check the pride he rightfully feels. Such a woe-begotten attitude is beatable by recognizing Lucic for the accomplishments he realized right here at home. However, too many are still hurting over the hometown champion who helped conquer the hometown. Said Snezana, “That’s why Milan does not want to be out there, parading the Cup around his hometown.”

Great job guys, you upset Lucic’s mother.

Days with the Cup: Conclusion of Stanley’s Euro tour, Paille goes to Niagra Falls and more

Tyler Seguin

The Stanley Cup has seen some exotic (and wet) places since we last took a look at its tour among the Boston Bruins. Let’s go in chronological order, beginning with the last leg of its European tour.

Tuukka Rask’s day (July 24):

It must be strange to be Rask. He was the expected starter going into the 2010-11 season only to see Tim Thomas return to his Vezina Trophy form from 2008-09 and steal back the job. Instead of being the Bruins’ starter, he was relegated to solid backup duty. A lot has been made of the trade value of backups like Cory Schneider and Jonathan Bernier, but Rask’s case might be the most interesting since Thomas is an aging star.

There wasn’t a whole lot of information available about Rask’s day wit the Cup in Finland, but this mini-clip shows that it wasn’t for a lack of fun.

Shawn Thornton relaxes with the Cup (July 27):

The bruising forward had his first run with the Stanley Cup thanks to the Anaheim Ducks’ dominating 2007 win, so he told NHL.com that he “took care of” the fans and other people who demanded their moment with him and the silver chalice last time around. (Note: “took care of” does not mean murder.)

That being said, Thornton wasn’t a total homebody; he took the Cup to the top of Toronto’s CN Tower and spent plenty of his time signing autographs and making sure that people had their chance to see it.

“I think when you tell the city or whatever you’re going to show up somewhere, you end up being there for a lot longer and we don’t have it for that long,” Thornton told the Bruins’ website. “I’ve seen it happen before, you schedule two hours to be at an event and you end up being there for four or five because you don’t want to say no to the kids.

“I’m fortunate enough that this is my second time and I did a lot of the ‘taking care of people’ the first time I had it, so this time is a lot more chill, a lot more relaxed.”

Danile Paille (July 28):

Unlike Thornton’s laid-back day with the Cup, Daniel Paille’s was scripted to get the most of his measly hours. The rugged winger brought it to a place it’s apparently never been before: Niagara Falls. Here’s video footage of the Stanley Cup going along for the “Maid of the Mist” ride.

Rich Peverley (July 29):

Peverley shared the Cup with 2,300 fans from his hometown of Guelph, but for the most part, the underrated center decided to take it easy with his family and friends on his day with the Cup.

Gregory Campbell’s heartwarming day with the Cup (July 30):

It was easy for critics to pick on the son of former discipline czar Colin Campbell during the 2010-11 season, but it’s nearly impossible to do anything but admire “Soupy’s” use of his day with the Cup. The grinding forward brought the Cup to Grand River Hospital in Kitchener to share it with kids who are “fighting a much bigger fight” than any hockey game could provide.

Tyler Seguin is today’s lucky winner for a day with the Cup. We’ll keep an eye on what he does, but if you cannot wait, here are a few photos to whet your whistle. Stay tuned for more day with the Stanley Cup updates as the Bruins’ summer-long victory lap continues.

Days with the Stanley Cup: Kaberle and the Piggy Band, Krejci’s ‘Cupbombing’; Chara’s day begins

Tomas Kaberle, David Krejci, Zdeno Chara

After a rough beginning in which the Stanley Cup didn’t arrive in time for Nathan Horton’s parade in Dunnville, Ontario, it seems like things went a bit smoother once the silver chalice made its way to the Czech Republic. NHL.com has a running blog of its journey, as it went from Tomas Kaberle on July 20 to David Krejci on the 21 and is now in the over-sized hands of Zdeno Chara today.

It only seems right that Kaberle’s day with the Cup was a little strange since his own journey with the Boston Bruins will be remembered by many as a bumpy ride. In a scene that Sean Leahy compares to the polarizing Jim Carrey vehicle “The Cable Guy,” Kaberle was greeted by the … “Hello Piggy Band.” NHL.com compares the place to what you might find at a “Knights of Columbus-type establishment” while Jame Mirtle tries to make a little more sense out of that weird portion of the celebration.

Kaberle was far from alone during his day with the Cup as Krejci, a “20-motorcycle motorcade” and plenty of Czech fans and friends joined him for the festivities despite rainy conditions. Here’s a quick look at his celebration.

Some people furrowed their brows when Pierre McGuire called Krejci “Boston’s Pavel Datsyuk.” As it turns out, maybe Krejci is more like Boston’s Ryan Kesler. That at least seems to be the case in the video below, in which he’s guilty of “Cupbombing” (to steal NHL.com’s phrase) one of Kaberle’s videos.

Kaberle and Krejci continued to party and celebrate together on Thursday, even though rain was “bucketing” down on them. They appeared at a town hall gathering that included a mayor and approximately 3,500 fans, but Krejci’s arrival with the Cup was also quite spirited.

The Cup then took a two-hour trip to Slovakia, where Chara will enjoy his day today. It seems like Chara is taking care of the business end of the deal first as he endured a photo session, spoke with about 50 media members and completed tasks for sponsors.

We’ll keep an eye on Chara’s celebration and other fun moments the Cup will have this summer. Let’s look at who will get the Cup next via this schedule from WEEI.

Tuukka Rask: Savonlinna, Finland
Shawn Thornton: Oshawa, Ontario
Daniel Paille: Welland, Ontario
Rich Peverley: Guelph, Ontario
Gregory Campbell: Tillsonburg, Ontario
Tyler Seguin: Brampton, Ontario
Marc Savard: Peterborough, Ontario
Chris Kelly: Ottawa, Ontario
Patrice Bergeron: Quebec City, Quebec
Mark Recchi: Kamloops, British Columbia
Milan Lucic: Vancouver, British Columbia
Shane Hnidy: Neepawa, Manitoba
Johnny Boychuk: Edmonton, Alberta
Adam McQuaid: Prince Edward Island
Brad Marchand: Nova Scotia
Michael Ryder: Newfoundland
Tim Thomas: Flint, Mich.