Tag: David Steckel

David Steckel

Wild release Steckel from PTO


Yet another veteran hits the free agent pool and this time it’s a faceoff-winning centerman.

David Steckel was released from his professional tryout agreement by the Minnesota Wild. The 31-year-old former Maple Leaf, Capital, Devil, and Duck appeared in two preseason games with the Wild.

His competition in Wild camp to land a job as the fourth line center proved to be stiff. With pivot jobs already spoken for by Mikko Koivu, Kyle Brodziak, and Zenon Konopka holding down jobs with the latter two on the third and fourth lines already. It was an uphill climb from the get-go for Steckel.

As for where he’s headed next, Michael Russo of The Star Tribune says it’s likely he signs a deal with the Wild’s AHL team in Iowa.

Trade: Philly sends Zolnierczyk to Anaheim for Rosehill

Harry Zolnierczyk , Mike Lundin, Zac Rinaldo,  Peter Regin

The Anaheim Ducks have acquired forward Harry Zolnierczyk from Philadelphia in exchange for pugilist Jay Rosehill, according to TSN’s Bob McKenzie.

Zolnierczyk, 25, has spent the last two seasons shuttling between Philly and its AHL affiliate in Adirondack. He played in 37 games for the Flyers during the 2011-12 season, scoring 3G-3A-6PTS.

This season, the former Brown University product appeared in seven games, making a name for himself with a series of controversial hits.

The most recent one came in early March, when he was suspended four games for charging Senators forward Mike Lundin. (Pictured)

Rosehill, 27, signed a one-year deal with the Ducks in early January, but has spent the entire season playing with AHL Norfolk. He’s actually been somewhat productive with the Admirals, scoring 4G-4A-8PTS in 33 games while racking up 90 PIM.

Rosehill last appeared in the NHL during the 2011-12 campaign, appearing in 31 games for Toronto. He failed to score a point but did register 60 penalty minutes and a minus-four rating.

So, what does this deal mean for each team?

Zolnierczyk’s aggressive ways will add to a Ducks team loaded with size: David Steckel (6-foot-6, 215 pounds) Bryan Allen (6-foot-5, 226 pounds), Sheldon Souray (6-foot-4, 233 pounds) Patrick Maroon (6-4, 225) and Brad Staubitz (30 fights over the last two seasons).

Of course, Harry Z will have to make the Ducks first. He’s reportedly off to Norfolk to start.

Rosehill could squeeze into the Flyers lineup given the injuries to forwards Danny Briere, Max Talbot and Jody Shelley, though it seems like the AHL is a more likely landing spot.

PHT Morning Skate: Steckel thrilled Leafs traded him to ‘superior’ Ducks


PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Florida Panthers goaltender Jacob Markstrom has had difficulty getting comfortable in the opening minutes of his recent starts, but he broke that trend on Tuesday. (Sun Sentinel)

Former 34-goal scorer Michael Grabner (shoulder) might return to the New York Islanders’ lineup as early as Thursday. (New York Newsday)

David Steckel sees his trade from the Toronto Maple Leafs to Anaheim Ducks as a good birthday present. “You know you’re going to a superior team right now and it’s going to be fun,” he said. (Ducks.nhl.com)

San Jose Sharks forward Ryane Clowe admitted that he has watched video of himself from his more successful years and he wonders if there’s something he was doing then that he’s not doing anymore. He has no goals and nine assists in 25 games this season. (San Jose Mercury News)

Jaromir Jagr has historically been very effective against the Dallas Stars’ upcoming opponent, the Colorado Avalanche. (Dallas Morning News)

Edmonton Oilers coach Ralph Krueger likes the progress his team has made. 30-year-old blueliner Nick Schultz feels his teammates are starting to buy into the system. (Edmonton Journal)

For the Calgary Flames, losing is becoming all too familiar. (Calgary Sun)

Could we be in for an uneventful trade deadline? (Ottawa Citizen)

Trade: Anaheim acquires Steckel from Toronto


The Anaheim Ducks have added depth and size up front, acquiring David Steckel from Toronto in exchange for Ryan Lasch and a seventh-round pick in 2014.

Steckel, 31, has appeared in 13 games for Toronto this season, registering one assist while averaging seven minutes of ice time per contest.

The longtime Washington Capital (with a brief stint as a New Jersey Devil) fits into Anaheim’s apparent modus operandi for this season — get big, get physical.

At 6-foot-6 and 215 pounds, Steckel will join a team that brought in the likes of Bryan Allen (6-foot-5, 226 pounds), Sheldon Souray (6-foot-4, 233 pounds) Patrick Maroon (6-4, 225) and Brad Staubitz (30 fights over the last two seasons).

In January, the Ducks also signed noted enforcer Jay Rosehill to a one-year deal.

Steckel’s best NHL season came in 2008-09 — in Washington, under current Ducks head coach Bruce Boudreau — when he posted a career-high 19 points and led the Capitals in faceoff winning percentage (57.9).

He also appeared in 14 playoff games for the Caps that year, scoring 3G-2A-5PTS while averaging over 16 minutes a game.

In Lasch, the Leafs get a 26-year-old forward that played in Sweden during the 2010-11 season and Finland during 2011-12.

He played briefly with Anaheim’s AHL affiliate in Norfolk this year before heading back to the Swedish Elite League, where he’s currently with the Vaxjo Lakers.

This move opens up an NHL roster spot for the Leafs, which coincides with Joffrey Lupul being medically cleared to return to action after breaking his arm.

Burke era in Toronto: Trades, truculence and tirades

Brian Burke

As reported earlier, Brian Burke has been fired as president and general manager of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

The Burke era began in 2008 and spanned 305 games, with a record of 128-135-42 and zero playoff appearances.

Those are the numbers, but this story is about more.

Much, much more.

Let’s take a look back at some of Burke’s most memorable moments in Tronna.


It’s hard to know exactly where to start. Burke was a perpetual mover and shaker during his time in Toronto, making over 40 trades in what amounted to a total roster overhaul.

He brought in the likes of Dion Phaneuf, Phil Kessel, James van Riemsdyk, John-Michael Liles, Joffrey Lupul, Jake Gardiner, Matt Lombardi and David Steckel.

He shipped out the likes of Tomas Kaberle, Luke Schenn, Alexei Ponikarovsky, Nik Antropov, Jamal Mayers, Matt Stajan and Ian White.

He brought in and shipped out Kris Versteeg, JS Giguere and Francois Beauchemin.

But the signature move of Burke’s wheeling and dealing was the Kessel trade, in which Boston netted two first-round picks that would become Tyler Seguin and Dougie Hamilton.

It was his boldest and most contentious move, one that will continue to be referenced well into Dave Nonis’ tenure.


“We require, as a team, proper levels of pugnacity, testosterone, truculence and belligerence,” Burke told the media upon being hired in 2008. “That’s how our teams play.”

It’s the line that stuck with Burke throughout his time in Toronto.

While the strategy reaped huge rewards in Anaheim — Burke won a Cup with a roster featuring Shawn Thornton, Travis Moen, George Parros, Sean O’Donnell and Brad May — it never came to fruition with the Leafs.

The likes of Colton Orr, Mike Brown, Garnet Exelby and Jay Rosehill were acquired in an ill-fated effort to get tough and, in perhaps his most egregious “tough” signing, Burke shelled out $22.5 million for Mike Komisarek.

“He’s a respected competitor in this league,” Burke said upon signing Komisarek. “We know that he will bring his hard-nosed approach to our team on a consistent basis.”

Komisarek only appeared in 45 games last year and was often a healthy scratch.

Today, he’s mostly mentioned as an amnesty buyout candidate.


Burke was nothing if not combative during his four-plus years on the job. Fights, feuds and potential fisticuffs were constant:

He ripped ESPN

He ripped CBC

— He said the Penguins were good because they “won a goddamn lottery

He ripped Don Cherry

He ripped Ron MacLean

— He wanted to rent a barn to stage a fist fight between him and Kevin Lowe

He ripped Leafs fans

He ripped the Toronto media

— He called Ron Wilson a “Hall of Fame coach” then fired him three months later

He ripped Francois Allaire

He ripped anonymous player polls

Say what you will about the job he did, or the way he conducted himself — the NHL is going to be less interesting now that Brian Burke’s no longer a part of it.


Leafs fire Brian Burke (!!!); Nonis named replacement