Tag: Dany Heatley


Sharks to use compliance buyout on Havlat


The rumors out of San Jose were confirmed on Friday at the NHL Draft, as CSN Bay Area confirmed the Sharks will use a compliance buyout on the final year of Martin Havlat’s contract.

Wilson earlier said Havlat wouldn’t be back next season, but would try to facilitate a trade rather than amensty the deal.

Havlat, 30, has one year left on his six-year, $30 million contract signed with the Wild in 2009. The buyout will free San Jose of his $5 million cap hit, but the club will pay Havlat $1M in 2014-15 and $2M in 2015-16.

The buyout marks the end of Havlat’s disappointing tenure with the Sharks. Acquired in 2011 as part of the deal that sent Dany Heatley to Minnesota, the Czech forward suffered through a myriad of injuries and never appeared in more than 48 games in a single season. That said, Havlat’s still been a relatively effective scorer — he had 27 points in 39 games during the 2011-12 campaign, and 12 goals and 22 points last year.

For San Jose, the move kicks off what could be a major summer rebuild. The club has already dealt away Dan Boyle and re-signed Alex Stalock to challenge Antti Niemi for the No. 1 goalie gig; Brent Burns will be moved back to defense and both Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau have seen their names come up in trade rumors.

Per CSN Bay Area, the Sharks won’t use their other compliance buyout.

Rookie Mountain High: Avs’ MacKinnon wins Calder


For the second time in three years, the Calder Trophy is going to Denver.

Colorado Avalanche rookie Nathan MacKinnon captured the league’s rookie of the year award on Tuesday night, beating out Tampa Bay teammates Ondrej Palat and Tyler Johnson for the honor. With the win, MacKinnon joined Avs captain Gabriel Landeskog as a Calder winner (Landeskog captured his in 2011-12) and just the ninth player in NHL history to win the trophy after being selected No. 1 overall, joining the likes of Gilbert Perreault, Denis Potvin, Bobby Smith, Dale Hawerchuk, Mario Lemieux, Bryan Berard, Alex Ovechkin and Patrick Kane.

Though Palat and Johnson had solid years, MacKinnon was a runaway Calder winner given his tremendous regular season — the former QMJHL Halifax star topped all first-year players in points (63), goals (24-tied), assists (39), power-play goals (8), game-winning goals (5-tied) and shots (241) this year.

Here are the voting results for the top 10 candidates:

Pts. (1st-2nd-3rd-4th-5th)
1. Nathan MacKinnon, COL 1347 (130-6-1-0-0)
2. Ondrej Palat, TB 791 (5-78-29-15-5)
3. Tyler Johnson, TB 352 (0-13-29-30-26)
4. Torey Krug, BOS 287 (1-9-23-25-24)
5. Olli Maatta, PIT 225 (0-11-18-16-10)
6. Jacob Trouba, WPG 213 (1-11-17-9-14)
7. Hampus Lindholm, ANA 208 (0-7-15-22-18)
8. Sean Monahan, CGY 38 (0-2-2-3-5)
9. Frederik Andersen, ANA 25 (0-0-0-4-13)
10. Chris Kreider, NYR 20 (0-0-1-3-6)

To little surprise, MacKinnon ran away with the voting. In case you’re wondering, Nashville Predators defenseman Seth Jones came in 11th.

Take a look at the Calder Trophy winners and runners up since 1990:

Year Winner Runner-up
2014 Nathan MacKinnon, Col. Ondrej Palat, T.B.
2013 Jonathan Huberdeau, Fla. B. Gallagher, Mtl.
2012 Gabriel Landeskog, Col. R. Nugent-Hopkins, Edm.
2011 Jeff Skinner, Car. Logan Couture, S.J.
2010 Tyler Myers, Buf. Jimmy Howard, Det.
2009 Steve Mason, CBJ Bobby Ryan, Ana
2008 Patrick Kane, Chi. N. Backstrom, Wsh
2007 Evgeni Malkin, Pit. Paul Stastny, Col.
2006 Alex Ovechkin, Wsh. Sidney Crosby, Pit.
2004 Andrew Raycroft, Bos. Michael Ryder, Mtl.
2003 Barret Jackman, St.L Henrik Zetterberg, Det.
2002 Dany Heatley, Atl. Ilya Kovalchuk, Atl.
2001 Evgeni Nabokov, S.J. Brad Richards, T.B.
2000 Scott Gomez, N.J. Brad Stuart, S.J.
1999 Chris Drury, Col. Marian Hossa, Ott.
1998 Sergei Samsonov, Bos. Mattias Ohlund, Van.
1997 Bryan Berard, NYI Jarome Iginla, Cgy.
1996 Daniel Alfredsson, Ott. Eric Daze, Chi.
1995 Peter Forsberg, Que. Jim Carey, Wsh.
1994 Martin Brodeur, N.J. Jason Arnott, Edm.
1993 Teemu Selanne, Wpg. Joe Juneau, Bos.
1992 Pavel Bure, Van. Nicklas Lidstrom, Det.
1991 Ed Belfour, Chi. Sergei Fedorov, Det.
1990 Sergei Makarov, Cgy. Mike Modano, Min.


UFA of the Day: Dany Heatley

Edmonton Oilers v Minnesota Wild

Check PHT each weekday for the first four weeks of June for a new pending unrestricted free agent of the day. Today’s UFA of the Day is…

Dany Heatley

A two-time 50-goal scorer. Six times he’s eclipsed the 30-goal mark. He won Olympic gold for Canada in 2010. And he’s tied with Marian Gaborik for the highest expiring cap hit of all pending UFAs, at $7.5 million. This guy’s going to get paid, right?

Wrong. Heatley had just 12 goals in 76 games this season for the Wild and hasn’t been a dangerous scorer for a few years now. Where he ends up next season remains to be seen, but the 33-year-old winger seems destined to move on from Minnesota.

“We’ll see at the end of the year,” Wild general manager Chuck Fletcher said last month, per the StarTribune. “His contract is up, and we can just see what the fit is going to be and for us, the key thing is we have to look at our young players and where they’re all going to fit. … So we’ll sit down at the end of the year and talk to Dany and take a look and see how we end up here.”

Is there reclamation potential in Heatley? If he doesn’t sign an extension in Minnesota, that’s what his agent will have to sell on the open market this summer. Maybe the argument could be that the Wild’s system wasn’t a good fit. Or that he didn’t have any chemistry with the Wild’s play-makers.

It’ll be a tough sell. The common wisdom is that Heatley has lost a step (or more than a step) and can’t keep up with today’s younger, faster players.

‘We’ll see’ about Heatley’s future in Minnesota, says GM

Dany Heatley #15 of the Minnesota Wild takes a shot as he warms up prior to facing the Colorado Avalanche at the Pepsi Center on February 2, 2012 in Denver, Colorado.
(February 1, 2012 - Source: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images North America)

One of the NHL’s more onerous contracts is set to expire this summer when Dany Heatley’s six-year, $45 million deal comes off the Wild’s books.

And to hear GM Chuck Fletcher explain it, the club isn’t exactly rushing to figure out a way to bring Heatley back.

“We’ll see at the end of the year,” Fletcher said, per the Minnesota Star-Tribune. “His contract is up, and we can just see what the fit is going to be and for us, the key thing is we have to look at our young players and where they’re all going to fit.”

Since Minnesota’s season is still going and Heatley is playing (albeit in a fourth-line role) it’s understandable why Fletcher’s trying to be as non-committal and optimistic as possible about a potential return. But let’s be real: barring a gigantic pay cut, Heatley — who’s never scored more than 26 goals for the Wild and was a healthy scratch at times this season —  is done in Minnesota.

Whispers around the league suggest some, if not all, of the cap space freed from his contract will go to Thomas Vanek, the pending UFA rumored to be Minnesota’s No. 1 target. The Wild also need to decide what to do with trade deadline acquisition Matt Moulson, and reach a new deal with key RFAs Nino Neiderreiter.

Finances, plus Fletcher’s desire to give more young forwards a shot — the Wild still have ’11 first-rounder Zack Phillips in the mix — will basically squeeze Heatley out, though Fletcher is leaving the door open ever so slightly.

“We’ll sit down at the end of the year and talk to Dany,” he said, “and take a look and see how we end up here.”

Rest, tips from coaches helped Heatley rebound in playoffs

Dany Heatley

Dany Heatley has struggled since arriving in Minnesota from San Jose.

He has often been put on the fourth line or scratched this season and both of those things happened to him in the playoffs. Wild coach made Heatley a healthy scratch in Games 1 and 2 and found himself on the fourth line when he returned to action in Game 3.

That didn’t stop Heatley in Game 7 against Colorado as he had a goal and, for a night, looked a little like the guy who was a threat to score any time he was on the ice he used to be.

As Jim Souhan of the Star-Tribune writes, Heatley credits that bit of rest and advice from assistant coaches Darby Hendrickson and Andrew Brunette for his bounce back.

“You kind of knew that if you get scratched and the team goes on a good run it’s going to be tough to get back in. I kind of took it as a positive, to get some rest. You’ve got to give Darby and Bruno a lot of credit. They really helped me, skating, working on different stuff that you don’t get to do if you’re in the lineup.”

Heatley is an unrestricted free agent after this season and while he’s not going to see the same kind of payday he had on this contract (Six years, $45 million), he’s playing for a new contract elsewhere. Taking advantage of his minutes the way he did in Game 7 would go a long way to helping himself.