Tag: Daniel Alfredsson

OTTAWA, ON - DECEMBER 1: Chris Phillips #4 of the Ottawa Senators skates during an NHL game against the Detroit Red Wings at Canadian Tire Centre on December 1, 2013 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Phillips says ‘not a lot going on’ with new Sens deal as trade rumors swirl


Chris Phillips has spent his entire 17-year career in Ottawa but, with the Mar. 5 trade deadline looming and no new deal in place, rumors have surfaced about him possibly moving elsewhere.

On Friday, Phillips — representing himself in negotiations with the Sens — said there’s “not a lot going on” regarding an extension in Ottawa, per the Sun’s Bruce Garrioch. That bit of news makes this Insider Trading report from TSN’s Darren Dreger all the more interesting:

 In terms of Phillips, there’s a negotiation that’s ongoing between the Ottawa Senators and Phillips to keep him a lifer in Ottawa. If that doesn’t go well, if Phillips doesn’t like the offer that has been presented, then Bryan Murray may have to make a very difficult decision.

There would be interest in Chris Phillips, a veteran player, very sound defensively, maybe he’s a good fit with the Boston Bruins.

Phillips, 35, is in the final of a three-year, $9.25 million deal, carrying an average annual cap hit of $3.08 million. He currently holds a limited no-movement clause; according to CapGeek, Phillips can provide a list of 10 teams he won’t accept a trade to.

Boston is believed to be in the market for blueline depth after losing Dennis Seidenberg for the year to a torn ACL. Phillips would seemingly be a good fit, considering he’s battle-tested (over 100 postseason appearances) and able to log significant minutes (averaging close to 21 per game this year).

That said, it’s hard to imagine Ottawa losing two of its longest-tenured players in less than a calendar year, having already watched Daniel Alfredsson bolt to sign in Detroit this past summer.

Sweden’s Nicklas Backstrom a late scratch for gold medal game

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 14: Nicklas Backstrom #19 of Sweden handles the puck in the second period against Switzerland during the Men's Ice Hockey Preliminary Round Group C game on day seven of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Bolshoy Ice Dome on February 14, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

Sweden’s offense has been dealt another major blow. Nicklas Backstrom was initially included on the team’s lineup for the gold medal game against Canada, but he didn’t participate in the pregame warmups and has now officially been scratched, per the Chicago Sun-Times’ Mark Lazerus.

Defenseman Henrik Tallinder has been selected to fill the vacant lineup spot.

If Sweden wins the gold medal today, it will have been by overcoming some major injuries. In addition to missing Backstrom, Sweden is also playing without forwards Henrik Sedin, Johan Franzen, and Henrik Zetterberg.

That being said, the Swedes can still challenge Canadian goaltender Carey Price with the likes of forwards Daniel Alfredsson, Alexander Steen, Loui Eriksson, and Daniel Sedin. Then there’s defenseman Erik Karlsson, who has been explosive in this tournament with four goals and four assists in five games. Canada will have to watch out for him.

Five challenges for Canada, which still has a job to do

Ice Hockey - Winter Olympics Day 14 - United States v Canada

1. Get refocused, and don’t be too confident

Not to take anything away from Friday’s big win over the United States, but that’s in the past. Sunday is the focus now.

The Swedes have flown largely under the radar this tournament, but after an uneven start and the loss of Henrik Zetterberg, they seem to be hitting their stride just in time. Like Canada, they still haven’t lost a game.

“We weren’t one of the favorites to make the finals, but we believed in ourselves, and it’s a great feeling to be here now,” said Daniel Alfredsson after beating Finland in the semifinals.

Alfredsson must not have read many pre-Olympic predictions, because a lot of people did, in fact, pick his team to make the finals. Even without Zetterberg and Henrik Sedin, the Swedes are still plenty dangerous up front, and their blue line is matched in depth and talent only by the Canadians. And, of course, they’ve got…

2. Henrik Lundqvist

Remember when he was struggling with the Rangers? Yeah, he’s not struggling anymore. Lundqvist came into the Olympics playing well, and he’s stayed hot in Sochi. Only six shots have beaten him in five games, for a 1.20 goals-against average and .951 save percentage.

If not for Lundqvist, the Swedes may very well have lost to Switzerland in the preliminaries. The one goal he did allow versus the Finns wasn’t a good one, but otherwise he was perfect.

“I gave up a tough one there,” he said. “I definitely thought it was an icing so I kind of relaxed and I just made a bad move.”

But, “If you take away that one goal I feel like I played a really solid game, I did the things I need to do.”

3. Start burying some chances

source:  This goes hand-in-hand with point No. 2. Despite all the goal-scoring forwards the Canadians brought with them to Sochi, only four have actually scored. Jeff Carter has three, Jame Benn two, and Patrick Sharp and Ryan Getzlaf each have one.

Against the Americans — just like against the Norwegians, Latvians, and Finns — Canada had lots of shots and not many goals. Granted, Jonathan Quick was a big part of that, but that doesn’t change the fact that Sidney Crosby, Chris Kunitz, Corey Perry, Patrick Marleau, Jonathan Toews, Rick Nash, and Patrice Bergeron have yet to bury one this tournament.

Now, clearly, the most important thing for Canada is defense. Mike Babcock has said time and again that his team’s only job is to score one more than the opposition. So far it’s done that. But shutting out the Swedes won’t be easy. In part because…

4. Stay out of the box

Sweden’s power play has been deadly, scoring seven times on 19 chances. Defenseman Erik Karlsson has three of those seven PP goals, including the game-winner versus Finland, a blast from the point that beat Kari Lehtonen.

Canada has been fairly disciplined to this point, going shorthanded 16 times in five games. But Sweden has the kind of skilled players that tend to draw penalties, and the Swedes as a whole should possess the puck more than some of the sides Canada has faced so far.

“Our coach (Par Marts) keeps telling us ‘go for it, go for it, go for it’ even when we feel we shouldn’t be going for it sometimes,” said Lundqvist. “He encourages our players to use their skill. As long as we use the puck well it’s good for us.”

5. The big ice

What, you thought you’d heard the last of the big-ice factor? Sorry, but when a country hasn’t won Olympic gold outside of North America since 1952, it’s a factor until it bumps the slump. Especially against Sweden, the defending world champs and the last winner of Olympic gold on the big ice, eight years ago in Turin.

“They’re incredibly stingy defensively; they’re hard to play against,” Matt Duchene said of the Swedes, per NHL.com. “They like to slow the game down, they like to re-group. They almost play the game like soccer on this big ice. It’s a chess match, it’s going to be a chess match. I have a great appreciation for Swedish hockey after playing in that league and playing against them last year in the [world championship] and other times.”

Sweden hitting its stride, just in time to play for gold

Sochi Olympics Ice Hockey Men

SOCHI, Russia – It may be undefeated, and it may have booked a spot in Sunday’s gold-medal game with today’s 2-1 win over Finland, but the Olympics haven’t been without adversity for the Swedish men’s hockey team.

Already without Henrik Sedin to start the Games, the Swedes lost their captain, Henrik Zetterberg, after their first preliminary match versus the Czechs, a 4-2 victory. A pair of uneven wins, 1-0 over Switzerland and 5-3 over Latvia, furthered the notion that their gold-medal hopes had taken a serious hit.

Despite earning the top seed out of the preliminaries, the Swedes knew they had to get better.

“There’s been some bumps and bruises along the way,” defenseman Niklas Kronwall said. “I thought today (versus Finland) we needed to play our best hockey of the tournament, and I think we did.”

“That’s been a thing for successful Swedish teams,” said forward Daniel Sedin. “We usually start out pretty slow, then get better throughout the tournament.”

Sedin is right about that. In 2006, the Swedes went 3-2 in group play, losing 5-0 to Russia and 3-0 to Slovakia, before winning three straight elimination games and the gold medal.

“I think today we had a great game plan against Finland,” said forward Daniel Alfredsson. “We knew the neutral zone was important. We did a much better job than Russia did against them, with getting through, with getting the puck in, and not allowing them to counterattack too many times.”

Of course, there will be those who say that Sweden has had an easy route to the final, drawing tiny Slovenia in the quarterfinals and the Finns — without star goalie Tuukka Rask (flu), and with their own collection of injured centers — in the semis.

“I don’t know who would say that,” countered Sedin. “Either they don’t understand hockey, or I don’t know. There are no easy games in this tournament. Finland beats Russia. We beat Finland. All tough games.”

That said, Sedin knows that whoever the Swedes get in the gold-medal game – Canada or the United States – it will likely be their biggest challenge of the tournament.

“Either or, it’s going to be tough,” he said. “It’s probably the two best teams playing in the other semifinals, but I think we have a chance if we play like we did today.”

Said Alfredsson of the challenge that awaits: “It will be a different game. We’ve played all European teams so far. Canada is more straightforward, they’re a heavier team than Finland is. The U.S., the same thing. They both play very similarly.”

With their semifinal win, the Swedes are guaranteed at least silver, and that’s better than they managed four years ago in Vancouver, when they were upset by Slovakia in the quarters.

Alfredsson doesn’t want to settle for second though.

“We weren’t one of the favorites to make the finals, but we believed in ourselves, and it’s a great feeling to be here now,” he said. “We’ve got to make sure that we regroup, and make sure that we’re not satisfied.”

Swede dreams: Sweden advances to gold medal final with win over Finland


Sweden is headed to its first Olympic gold medal final since 2006 thanks to Friday’s 2-1 win over Finland at the Bolshoy Ice Dome.

In a methodical, defensive affair, the Swedes received goals from Loui Eriksson and Erik Karlsson — Karlsson’s now tied with Phil Kessel for the tournament scoring lead — while Henrik Lundqvist stopped 25 of 26 shots for the win.

The goals came after Finland opened the scoring 6:17 into the second period, when Olli Jokinen squeaked one past Lundqvist from a bad angle.

“I think it was a chess match more than the intense battle we all expected,” Sweden’s Daniel Alfredsson told CBC’s Elliotte Friedman following the game.

In terms of atmosphere, the game had an odd feel. Finland defeated the host Russians to get into the semifinal matchup, and that may have contributed to a quiet, less-than-capacity crowd at the Bolshoy. That said, the Finns and Swedes still engaged in a feisty affair born from geography and a long history of high-stakes international competition (Sweden bested Finland for gold at the ’06 games in Turin.)

Finland had trouble utilizing its speed throughout Friday’s game and will no doubt rue its missed opportunities, especially on the power play. The Finns went 0-for-5 on the day, which was a tournament-long issue — they only scored three power play goals in Sochi, two coming in a tournament-opening 8-4 rout over Austria. The Finns will likely also wonder what life would’ve been like with No. 1 netminder Tuukka Rask in goal; he fell ill prior to the game and was replaced by Dallas’ Kari Lehtonen, who stopped 23 of 25 shots.

As for Sweden, it continued the theme of finding ways to win.

Though the team hasn’t been dominant in any of its victories — the 5-0 win over Slovenia in the quarters was deceiving, as the Sweden only led 1-0 going into the third — it has continually gotten the job done and remains the only undefeated Olympic squad to have won all its games in regulation.

Sweden is also now 11-1 in its last 12 Olympic games, dating back to its gold medal-winning performance in ’06.