Tag: Dan O’Halloran

Joel Quenneville

Here are your 2013 Stanley Cup finals officials


Fans in Boston and Chicago will have plenty of players on the opposing teams to voice their displeasure with, but it’s the guys in stripes that will hear most of the grief everywhere. Which guys get the call of working the Stanley Cup finals? Mark Spector of Sportsnet shares the list via Twitter.

Referees: Wes McCauley, Dan O’Halloran, Chris Rooney, Brad Watson (pictured)

Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Brian Murphy, Pierre Racicot, Jay Sharrers

One notable omission from the list of referees is former NHL Head of Officiating Stephen Walkom. Walkom came under fire during the Western Conference semifinals for calling matching penalties late in Game 7 between Chicago and Detroit while the Blackhawks scored what they thought was the go-ahead goal. Chicago, of course, scored in overtime to make the call a mere footnote, but the moment wasn’t forgotten.

The officials have come under a lot of scrutiny throughout the playoffs and that doesn’t figure to stop now that we’re in the finals. Both teams play tough and on the edge at times. Will they let them play or will we see the calls pick up now that everyone is watching?

Canucks coach Vigneault calls out referee O’Halloran

Alain Vigneault

Vancouver Canucks head coach Alain Vigneault had some interesting comments in the wake of Duncan Keith’s elbow on Daniel Sedin, taking umbrage not with the Chicago defenseman, but rather the referee that issued only a two-minute elbowing minor.

“We got a big two-minute power play off that hit from the same referee — remember last year when Daniel got punched six times in the face in the Boston series?” Vigneault told the Vancouver Sun. “I seem to remember it was the same guy.”

Vigneault’s referencing Dan O’Halloran, who worked Wednesday’s game against Chicago and Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals — the game where Marchand speedbagged Sedin:

Sedin and Marchand both got 10-minue misconducts while Marchand got an extra two for roughing. Vancouver’s beef was that 1) Sedin got penalized for doing nothing, and 2) Marchand wasn’t given more.

Now, to be fair — O’Halloran was working Game 6, but wasn’t exactly involved in the Sedin-Marchand incident. As the video shows, Kelly Sutherland was the guy trying to break it up and signaling to the penalty box; O’Halloran arrives late and just sorta stares at what’s transpired.

Not that the Canucks care about semantics. In their eyes, O’Halloran worked two games where Sedin was on the receiving end of controversial hits and questionable penalties.

It’ll be interesting to see what comes of Vigneault’s comments. Unlike Stephane Auger — another referee that’s been publicly scrutinized by the Vancouver organization — O’Halloran is a veteran official with a wealth of postseason experience (and international, working the gold medal game at the 2010 Olympics.)

There’s a good chance he and the Canucks will cross paths again, quite possibly in the playoffs.

Tonight’s officials have Game 7 experience from this season on their side

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Two
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One way or another the officials have played a role in how things go in the playoffs. While 98% of the time (a rough guesstimation) they’re able to keep things under control and do things the right way, there’s always those slivers of doubt and bewilderment should they get a call wrong. In tonight’s Game 7 we’ll have a pair of familiar faces officiating the game and guys that have already done a Game 7 in these playoffs.

Getting the job of handling Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals tonight are Dan O’Halloran and Stephen Walkom. Jean Morin and Jay Sharrers will handle the lines but the focus will be on O’Halloran and Walkom. For these two, this isn’t their first Game 7 dance in these playoffs and if you’re wondering how they might handle things tonight, if how they handled Game 7 between Boston and Tampa Bay in the Eastern Conference finals is any clue then don’t expect too many whistles.

In that game, there were zero penalties called as Boston was able to lock things down 1-0 in that Game 7 and move on to the Stanley Cup finals. The zero penalties was the first time that had happened in  a playoff game since 1990. To think we’ll see the same thing tonight out of these two teams that have been at each other’s throats through six games might be asking a lot.

When asked about that today, Claude Julien says he doesn’t expect things to be at all similar in how things are handled.

“I don’t know if it really matters because he’s been physical so far and it hasn’t affected our game. We can say right now in this series that the penalties cost us a game, so we just have to go out there and play, there are no guarantees that just because there were no penalties in the last game seven that it is going to be the same. To be honest with you, I doubt it, the way it’s been played. But nonetheless I think our focus has to remain the same. Good penalty killing and hopefully our power play does a good job tonight. And five-on-five we have to bring our best game,” Julien said.

The addition of O’Halloran to Game 7 is interesting because he officiated in Game 6 with Kelly Sutherland. As the boys at Kurtenblog note, Sutherland had a bit of a curious incident in Game 6 in which he got in between Henrik Sedin and Brad Marchand after Marchand took five or six jabs at Sedin’s face late in the game without a penalty being called nor a Sedin retaliation.

ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun noted the exchange and Sutherland apparently doesn’t have much a trigger finger when it comes to tossing a guy in the box for doing something obviously wrong, at least according to Sedin.

“Maybe after the fifth. But I took six. What can I do?” said Sedin, clearly agitated after being Marchand’s punching bag in the third period.

An emotional Sedin said something afterward to referee Kelly Sutherland.

“I asked him why he didn’t call the penalty. He said he was going to,” Sedin said.

With Game 7 figuring to be a powder keg-like situation, that lack of ability to control a situation is an absolute no-go. With Walkom, O’Halloran, and Sutherland getting the bulk of the work in the finals, seeing Sutherland not get the call to do this game is certainly worthy of a perked eyebrow.

The officials will give the guys all the room they need to decide the game on their own terms, but should things get out of hand with anything ranging from iffy hits to errant flops on the ice, they’ll make sure to act fast to put an end to it. The officials don’t want to be the reason for deciding a game, but wise words on these sorts of things stem from the Rush song “Freewill”:

If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

Here’s to hoping all the decisions made tonight are made with correct convictions.

Five things to look for in tonight’s Game 4

Stanley Cup Canucks Bruins Hockey

Tonight’s Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals arrives with intrigue pouring out of every possible angle you could draw up. After a Game 3 that saw vicious hits, tons of Boston goals, and lots of frustrated Canucks before and after the game there’s a lot of things Game 4 is going to tell us about how this series goes from here on out.

There’s a lot of different ways you could see happen tonight and we’ve got a list of five things to keep your eyes out for tonight.

1. Referee impact

We’ve seen so many different things happen in this series that’s required the attention of the officials and tonight’s referees Dan O’Halloran and Kelly Sutherland are going to have their hands full with all sorts of things to look for. The series has been overly physical and while everyone’s minds will be stuck on what happened with Nathan Horton and Aaron Rome and the various taunting, the officials have their marching orders to put that to an end should it occur again.

It will also be curious to see if any of the play around the goalies gets monitored right away. Tim Thomas’ physical play has the Canucks all up in arms and they want to see things straightened out there. O’Halloran and Sutherland will have to set the tone early about what sort of game they’re going to call. A loosely officiated one could lead to more dramatics.

2. The Replacements

With Nathan Horton out with a severe concussion and Aaron Rome out for delivering the blow, both teams will have guys to work into the lineup to fill holes in Game 4. Tyler Seguin will be back into the lineup after losing his sport to Shawn Thornton in Game 3. As for who takes Horton’s spot on the top line, you could see either Michael Ryder or Rich Peverley get the call there. Peverley took Horton’s spot there in Game 3 and played well while Ryder had a strong Game 3. Claude Julien may not want to move Ryder away from his Game 3 linemates however.

As for Vancouver, it’ll be Keith Ballard getting the nod to take Rome’s spot on the blue line. Ballard has a wealth of NHL experience but has struggled in dealing with Alain Vigneault’s choices on defense and has been passed over for the likes of Rome and even Chris Tanev at times this year. Vigneault is opting for experience this time around and Ballard will look to make it pay off.

3. Capitalizing on turnovers

Both teams have been excellent at making each other cough up the puck and while the Canucks did well to bury their chances in Games 1 and 2, it was all Boston in Game 3 as they pressured Vancouver’s defense into making bad plays and mishandling the puck, especially on the power play as they helped make the pairing of Christian Ehrhoff and Alex Edler look poor. While the Canucks had their chances off turnovers in Game 3, Tim Thomas helped stop them. We’ll see more of the high pressure defense from both teams and how they handle it may help determine the outcome of the game.

4. Home ice strikes back… In more ways than one

Remember how we were talking about how great road teams have played in the playoffs? So far in the finals the home teams have taken control winning all three games. Home teams are finally back on the right side of the ledger in the playoffs with a 45-40 record. The actual physical ice in TD Garden will be a topic of discussion as well.

After this morning’s skates there were complaints from some players that the ice was in bad shape. A concert was held last night here at TD Garden and today’s been abnormally warm in Boston which means we could see some strange bounces and slower moving pucks during the game. How it holds up later on in the game will be the real test.

5. How Vancouver bounces back

After such a beat down on the scoreboard and on the ice and all the complaining and politicking we’ve heard out of the Canucks since Game 3 ended, how they come back in Game 4 is going to be fascinating to watch. The last time we saw Vancouver take such a wicked beating in the playoffs, a 7-2 loss to Chicago in Game 4 in this year’s first round, they followed up in the next game by losing 5-0 which led to Cory Schneider starting in Game 6. We saw Vancouver get past all that by the skin of their teeth, but following up this beating in the finals with a similar stink bomb would change the focus of the series entirely.

Vancouver will need a better all-around game from Ryan Kesler and a more focused effort from Alex Burrows if they’re going to win this game and set up the potential of winning the Stanley Cup on home ice. Without that they’re in trouble.

Ty Conklin fumes over controversial goal call, NHL considers tweaking nets

Jonathan Toews,  Marian Hossa, Brian Campbell, Ty Conklin

Hockey is a sport in which every little goal can be important, considering how tough they truly are to come by (unless you happen to be Corey Perry, apparently). Referee Dan O’Halloran decided that Marian Hossa’s goal was legitimate – meaning that the puck crossed the red line and that Hossa’s stick touched the puck after he kicked it – and the NHL’s review room in Toronto couldn’t find enough evidence to overturn his decision.

That goal cut the St. Louis Blues’ lead in half, making the score 2-1. Getting that tally lit a fire under the desperate Chicago Blackhawks, who ended up winning the game thanks to a Jonathan Toews overtime goal.

Ty Conklin was in net for the Blues when that controversial call was made and – to little surprise – he was more than a bit peeved by the review process. One must wonder if he might even be at risk of earning a fine from the NHL for his surprisingly candid critique of the league’s decision. Conklin almost stepped in conspiracy theory territory, as you can see from this story via CSN Chicago.

“They called it a goal on the ice, which is fine, that’s understandable.  But the reason we have video replay is to get the right call. They’re probably going to make it into the playoffs anyway, but do we really have to make it that obvious that the league wants them in?” he said. “It was a close play, but the puck never crossed the line.”

If you want a snapshot of how much the Blues and Blackhawks dislike each other, that quote is an excellent example.

While the NHL’s system of handing out suspensions and fines draws plenty of mockery and criticism, the league’s goal review process seems just as nebulous. The league’s war room almost seems like a shadowy organization, even if they aren’t do anything more nefarious than deciding for or against goals.

Many people (including myself) would like to see more transparency in the decision making process, but TSN’s Darren Dreger indicates that the league is striving to improve things with a more literal type of transparency. Simply put, they want to change nets to make it easier to see if a puck crosses the goal line or not.

Camera angles, poor video quality and obstructed views have always plagued video review.

There have multiple proposals considered to improve this process, but the league seems focused on the nets and changes that can be introduced to increase visibility.

In addition to testing a thinner mesh on the top of the nets, the National Hockey League will also be changing the ribbon that essentially protects skates from hitting the base of the net.

The existing ribbon that wraps around the base is white, but will be replaced this summer at the research and development camp by a clear band which will extend three feet back of the goal line from each post.

People want a more open process, but let’s face it, we might not get that any time soon (if ever). I’m on board with the tweaks Dreger mentioned, along with the research and development camp’s proposals of adding a plexiglass top to the net and yellow line behind the goal line to make it easier to tell when goals are scored.

These changes won’t always make the Conklins of the world happy, but then again, will a goalie ever really be happy when a goal is allowed?

Finally, here’s video of that much-debated goal, for your own debating purposes.