Dan Hamhuis

No hearing scheduled for Hamhuis after Bennett headshot

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Vancouver defenseman Dan Hamhuis does not have a hearing scheduled following his illegal check to the head of Sam Bennett on Sunday night, per an NHL spokesman.

Here’s the hit in question, which earned Hamhuis a two minute minor:

Bennett, 18, returned to the ice shortly afte and was on for Jannik Hansen’s goal at 17:41 that cut Calgary’s lead to 4-2. Bennett didn’t play another shift following the goal.

The illegal check to the head was the second incident Hamhuis’ been in the middle of in as many games. During the brawl at the end of Game 2, he was the third man in a fight between Derek Dorsett and Deryk Engelland and received a game misconduct.

As for this latest incident, it’s worth nothing that NHL discipline czar Stephane Quintal could still schedule a hearing with Hamhuis for the Bennett hit. That said, it would need to happen rather quickly (and probably already would’ve) as the Flames and Canucks are right back in action tomorrow at the Saddledome.

Video: More late-game nastiness between Flames, Canucks

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They did it again.

After Friday’s wild Game 2 — in which the two sides combined for over 100 PIM during a wild line brawl — Calgary and Vancouver got after each other again late in Sunday’s Game 3, combining for 57 penalty minutes in the final frame:

As for potential ramifications, it’s possible Alex Burrows will receive a call from the NHL’s Department of Player Safety after accumulating five for fighting, two for boarding and two for instigating following his scrap with Kris Russell.

There’s also talk Dan Hamhuis could face supplemental discipline regarding his illegal check to the head on Sam Bennett.

Feisty Flames dump Canucks, win first home playoff game in six years

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Prior to tonight, the Saddledome faithful hadn’t seen postseason hockey since 2009.

They, and their Flames, savored the return.

And what a return it was, as the Flames rode a wave of emotion — and some gritty, physical play — to a 4-2 victory over Vancouver in Game 3 of their Western Conference first round matchup.

“It really helped us out tonight,” Flames center Sean Monahan said of the fan support.

“They were unbelievable,” added fellow forward Michael Ferland.

With the win, the Flames took a 2-1 lead in the series.

That win was also Calgary’s first in the playoffs at the Saddledome since defeating Chicago 6-4 in April of 2009. Back then, Mike Keenan was the coach and Jarome Iginla was the club’s veteran leader — a far cry from tonight, which further illustrated that Calgary’s youth movement isn’t just underway.

It’s thriving.

Sam Bennett, the 18-year-old playing in just his fourth NHL contest, scored what proved to be the game winner just 2:14 into the third period. Bennett, the fourth overall pick at the 2014 draft, notched his second point in three playoff games and helped solidify himself as a major contributor for a Calgary team that received plenty of support from the kids tonight.

Monahan, 20, scored an insurance marker for his first goal of the series. T.J. Brodie, 24, led the Flames with two points (1G, 1A). Ferland, 22, led all skaters with a game-high nine hits.

“They had a good forecheck. That’s the bottom line,” Canucks head coach Willie Desjardins said. “They got on our D. I thought they played physical all night. We turned over the first goal on the wall, where we couldn’t get it out. They did a good job on us.

“We have to be better. We weren’t good enough. We know that.”

Ferland’s ferocity embodied how the Flames played for most of the evening. They out-hit Vancouver 33-18 on the night and seemed to feed off a frenzied home crowd. They also carried over the emotion from the end of Game 2, when a wild brawl ended with over 130 minutes in penalties; Kris Russell squared off with Alex Burrows late in tonight’s third period, followed by a tilt between Ferland and Kevin Bieksa.

(Burrows was given an instigator penalty for his antics with Russell, and could be subjected to further discipline from the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. Dan Hamhuis could also be getting a call for a headshot on Bennett in the third period.)

As for Vancouver, tonight might prove a wake-up call. The Canucks controlled proceedings at Rogers Arena on Friday night but were unable to do the same this evening, and often looked to be the older, slower and less energetic team. If there was a bright spot, it was that some secondary scorers — Shawn Matthias and Jannik Hansen — scored their first goals of the series.

But that might be it, as far as silver linings go. Sunday night was all about Calgary.

Notes…

The Flames made a pair of lineup changes tonight: Tyler Wotherspoon drew in on defense for Corey Potter, while Mason Raymond played up front in place of Markus Granlund… Eddie Lack stopped 23 of 27 shots for Vancouver, Jonas Hiller stopped 23 of 25 for the Flames… It was another busy third period for the scorekeepers tonight, as the two teams combined for 57 PIM in the final frame.

Video: Flames, Canucks combine for over 100 PIM in wild line brawl

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VANCOUVER — With less than two minutes remaining in the Canucks’ 4-1 win over Calgary in Game 2 of their opening-round series, this happened:

Pugilism!

The brawl came after a chippy 58 minutes of action in which the Flames, stymied for most of the night by Vancouver’s tight checking and the goaltending of Eddie Lack, started to get physical; Michael Ferland took a healthy run at Chris Tanev that ended with a charging penalty midway through the third, and both Dennis Wideman and Yannick Weber were given 10-minute misconducts with less than five to go.

Then came the fireworks. Nobody’s quite sure of the total penalty minute tally yet, as the game officials still appear to be working out the figures, but the incident easily eclipsed 100 PIM all told.

Looking ahead, it’ll be interesting to see if the NHL’s Department of Player Safety opts to review any of tonight’s events; Deryk Engelland received an instigator penalty late, on top of two (yes, two) fighting majors and two (or possibly three) game misconducts.

There also could be a review of Dan Hamhuis, who was the third man in on the fight between Engelland and Derek Dorsett.

Red-hot Weber could be tough for Canucks to keep

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Canucks defenseman Yannick Weber entered the 2014-15 season knowing he had to be more reliable at five-on-five. That much was made clear by then-new coach Willie Desjardins.

Fast forward to the present and Weber has done just that. The 26-year-old has not been a defensive liability and, moreover, he leads all Vancouver blue-liners with 11 goals and has been a big reason the Canucks’ power play has climbed all the way to No. 8 in the NHL.

Consider: of his team’s last 11 power-play goals, Weber has scored four of them and has assists on two more. His booming right-hand shot from the point, on full display last night versus the Coyotes, has many in Vancouver recalling the days when Sami Salo would hammer it home from back there.

It also has observers wondering if the Canucks will be able to re-sign the pending restricted free agent.

Weber sounds like he’d like to stay.

“This is the team that gave me a second chance at a career in this league after Montreal and I’ve had some real good looks here,” he said, per The Province. “I’ve gotten a lot of trust from the coaches here and that goes a long way for any player.”

But in the wake of Luca Sbisa’s $10.8 million extension, will the Canucks have enough cap space to get something done? Because they also have Alex Edler, Kevin Bieksa, Dan Hamhuis, and Chris Tanev under contract through at least next season; those five will have a combined cap hit of $22.15 million in 2015-16.

It’s possible the Canucks could convince Weber to take a hometown discount next season, with the promise of more to come in the future.

It’s also possible they could try and trade Bieksa, who has just one year remaining before he can become an unrestricted free agent. But the 33-year-old franchise stalwart would need to agree to it, and leaving Vancouver isn’t something he’s shown much of a desire to do.

Losing Weber could hurt though.

“He’s played real well for us,” Desjardins said. “He’s made a difference. … To be successful, you need contributions like that from different guys and when you look back at the year … he made a big difference how he stepped up.”