Tag: Corey Potter

Corey Potter

Flames sign Potter to one-year, two-way deal


The Calgary Flames found some defensive reinforcements for the upcoming season.

The Flames signed former Oilers and Bruins defenseman Corey Potter to a one-year, two-way deal. Last season, he spent time with both the Edmonton Oilers and Boston Bruins playing in a total of 19 games with both teams.

Potter, 30, joins a Flames team in need of solid defensive help. With Mark Giordano leading the way, the rest of the blue line corps is a bit dicey. Ladislav Smid, T.J. Brodie, Kris Russell, Dennis Wideman, and Deryk Engelland round out what would appear to be Calgary’s top-six on defense.

While that crew could use more help, the thing they need most is depth and Potter will help out there especially with the rest of the depth hopefuls being young like Tyler Wotherspoon and Patrick Sieloff.

Potter’s best season came with the Oilers in 2011-12 when he had four goals and 21 points in 62 games. He’s played in 52 total games in the two seasons since then.

Seidenberg practices with B’s for first time since ACL tear (Updated)

Dennis Seidenberg

Another big step on Tuesday in Dennis Seidenberg’s improbable in-season comeback from a torn ACL — he took part in a full Bruins team practice, the first time he’s done so since suffering the injury in late December.

Update: Tap the brakes ever so slightly — Seidenberg isn’t partaking in contact drills…

The German rearguard was put on a pairing with Andrej Mezsaros in place of Corey Potter, who had been manning the unofficial No. 8 d-man role (Potter made just one appearance versus Detroit in the opening round.) It’s the latest in what’s been an accelerated return from a serious knee ailment — on Apr. 9, Seidenberg skated for the first time since surgery and, less than a month later, he’s partaking in practice.

The Bruins have been very guarded about Seidenberg’s chances to return this postseason, saying they weren’t ruling it out but also adding they weren’t optimistic about him coming back. Though they’ve played well without him, the B’s could certainly use Seidenberg’s services — he’s emerged as a terrific shutdown defenseman and, during last year’s Stanley Cup run, averaged nearly 27 minutes a night.

In October, he as rewarded for his efforts with a four-year, $16 million extension.

Without Seidenberg — and fellow blueliner Adam McQuaid — in the lineup, Boston has relied on youngsters like Dougie Hamilton (20), Torey Krug (22), Matt Bartkowski (25) and Kevan Miller (26) extensively this season, and has managed to squeeze some decent minutes out of trade deadline pickups like Potter and Meszaros.

As for the likelihood of Seidenberg returning to the lineup in the second round — there’s no set date on when the Boston-Montreal series will begin, though logic suggests it could start on Friday at TD Garden.

Pressing question: How will Boston’s defense hold up?

Chicago Blackhawks v Boston Bruins

One of PHT’s 10 pressing questions in advance of the 2014 Stanley Cup playoffs…

The Bruins have to hope the kids are alright, because Zdeno Chara can only do so much.

That’s the situation at hand for Boston as it looks to get back to the Stanley Cup Finals for the second consecutive year, starting Friday in an opening-round series against Detroit.

Chara is one of the league’s best defensemen, and it’s not a coincidence the Bruins’ fortunes started to turn shortly after he came over from Ottawa eight seasons ago.

That said, he’s now 37 and has endured a grueling stretch that dates back to the start of the condensed 2013 campaign.

As alluded to earlier, the B’s went to last year’s Cup Finals, meaning Chara had a shortened summer. Despite that, Boston has continued ply him an average of 24:39 minutes per game this year — and that was on top of his stint in the Olympics with Slovakia.

He’s performed superbly under the strain, but will it catch up to him? The possibility is higher now that we’re in the playoffs, where the intensity of the games increases and the Bruins are likely to ask Chara to play even more.

The Bruins have to hope fatigue won’t start to become a factor, because they’re missing the safety net that is defenseman Dennis Seidenberg. Though not at Chara’s level, Seidenberg is a solid blueliner, a veteran presence and someone that can be trusted to step up in the postseason. With him out with a torn ACL/MCL, the B’s defense after Chara does have some question marks.

Boston’s attempts to fill the Seidenberg void were largely unsuccessful. It did acquire Andrej Meszaros and claimed Corey Potter off of waivers at the deadline, but those are complimentary defensemen rather than guys you want to lead in critical games.

MORE: Latest Bruins news, analysis from CSN New England

As a result, the Bruins need to hope their young blueliners will help carry the load. That includes 25-year-old Matt Bartkowski, 20-year-old Dougie Hamilton, and 23-year-old Torey Krug.

All three received some playoff experience in 2013 and held their own, with Krug in particular sticking out, but this time will be different. They’ve established themselves as important parts of the blueline during the regular season and will consequently be asked to log significant minutes in key situations during the postseason. If Chara does start to show signs of wearing down, the young trio that will need to take on even more responsibilities.

If they can pull that off, the Bruins will have managed a seamless change of the guard on the blueline from the core of veterans that won them the Stanley Cup in 2011 that included Chara, Seidenberg, Andrew Ference, Tomas Kaberle, Johnny Boychuk and Adam McQuaid, to a new generation that will potentially carry Boston for years to come.

That shift to a new generation is necessary, even if injuries have forced the process to accelerate, but these changes often involve growing pains. The cost of the transition might end up being a quick exit from the playoffs in 2013 — despite their regular season success.

For more Pressing Playoff Questions, click here.

Bruins not optimistic about Seidenberg playoff return

Dennis Seidenberg

Last month, there was excitement coming out of Boston as reports suggested Dennis Seidenberg — out since December with a torn ACL — might be able to return to the lineup come playoff time.

On Monday, that enthusiasm was tempered a bit.

“We’re not counting on Dennis to be back,” B’s GM Peter Chiarelli said, per CSNNE. “We’re going to be very cautious with his injury. He has been skating, but that’s all I can say on it. It really hasn’t changed.”

Seidenberg resumed skating on Apr. 9 and, at the time, Boston Herald sources claimed the team was contemplating a possible lineup return should the Bruins go deep into the playoffs. The 32-year-old German rearguard emerged as a terrific shutdown defenseman during last year’s Stanley Cup run, averaging nearly 27 minutes a night and was rewarded for his efforts with a four-year, $16 million extension in October.

Without Seidenberg — and fellow blueliner Adam McQuaid — in the lineup, Boston has relied on youngsters like Dougie Hamilton (20), Torey Krug (22), Matt Bartkowski (25) and Kevan Miller (26) extensively this season, and has managed to squeeze some decent minutes out of trade deadline pickups Andrej Meszaros and Corey Potter.


Bruins’ Boychuk (leg) remains day-to-day, out Tuesday

Antoine Vermette, Johnny Boychuk
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The red-hot Boston Bruins will face a hungry New Jersey Devils team on Tuesday without defenseman Johnny Boychuk, who is labeled day-to-day with a leg injury. The 30-year-old also missed Monday’s game against the Minnesota Wild.

(The team calls it a “bruise” and leaves the door open for a return later this week; Boston has games on Friday and Saturday as well.)

Corey Potter draws into the lineup tonight, according to CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty.

As hot as Boston is right now, the Bruins are heading toward what could be a challenging final stretch with 10 of their final 14 games away from home. If they look as strong in mid-April as they do in mid-March, then many will indeed peg them as a leading contender in the East.