Tag: contract years

Jarome Iginla

Jarome Iginla on future with Flames: “I have no idea”


The Calgary Flames find themselves outside the playoffs for a third consecutive season (and you could argue that they’ve been out of legitimate contention for quite a bit longer). Any reasonable person connected to the team would have some soul searching to do, so perhaps it makes sense that the face of the franchise has a furrowed brow.

Even so, Jarome Iginla’s mixed feelings following the Flames’ finale remain pretty stunning. Vicki Hall captures his thoughts on the future:

“I have no idea; I don’t know what next year holds,” Iginla said. “Do I want to be on a team where we’re going to fully rebuild. I don’t know that I do.”

In a way, those quotes almost read like what his exact inner monologue might sound like.

To some, it seems like things keep dragging on with Iginla and the Flames, but it’s easy to overlook how deep his roots really are. Ever since being traded from the Dallas Stars, he’s been a fixture in Calgary since the 1996-97 season.

Iginla’s production has been up-and-down the past few years. From 2006-09, he had 94, 98 and 89-point seasons. Iginla dipped in 2009-10 with 69 points, rose last season with 86 and then went back down to 67 this year.

Considering the top-heavy nature of that team, that’s not enough to get the postseason. Iginla took the blame in that regard, yet most people would probably agree that he’s needed more help for some time.

In case you’re wondering, Iginla has one more season remaining on his current contract. The final year of a deal is often one of the most manageable for good deck-clearing trades, but that would involve a major, painful step.

So that brings us to the big questions: should the Flames trade Iginla? Should Iginla ask for a trade?

Ales Hemsky tests his surgically repaired shoulders, hopes for healthy 2011-12 season

Bruins Oilers Hockey

The Edmonton Oilers aren’t the only team that has been mired at the bottom of the league’s ranks for long enough to stock up on high-end draft picks for a few years. The Pittsburgh Penguins, Washington Capitals and Chicago Blackhawks can thank some pitiful stretches of hockey for the fresh faces of their drastically improved franchises.

That being said, the Penguins, Capitals and Blackhawks took some big steps in the right direction once they landed some top prospects. It seemed to happen once they added at least two stars-to-be. The Penguins took off only after Evgeni Malkin joined Sidney Crosby & Co. a year after Crosby entered the league. The Capitals started to take off once they hired Bruce Boudreau, but it didn’t hurt that Nicklas Backstrom came along to ride shotgun with Alex Ovechkin. Jonathan Toews was drafted in 2006 but the Blackhawks waited until they nabbed Patrick Kane at No. 1 in ’07 before unleashing their two new game-changers onto the hockey world.

While Taylor Hall and Ryan Nugent-Hopkins might not have the same ceilings as those six other star players, they’re both the top overall picks of their respective NHL drafts. Oilers fans have been reasonably patient watching their prospect pool grow, but sooner or later, there’s going to be a “something’s got to give” point.

A healthy Hemsky could help the Oilers turn the corner

If that point happens to be the 2011-12 season, the Oilers are going to need results from more than just their big name youngsters. One of their few legitimate prime players is playmaker Ales Hemsky, a fantastic passing winger who cannot seem to stay on the ice often enough for the hockey world to truly gauge his talents.

In a way, Hemsky’s next season is his “something’s got to give” moment. He hasn’t even played in half of the Oilers games during the last two seasons (he played in 47 games in 10-11 and just 22 in 09-10) as injury after injury made him Edmonton’s answer to Marian Gaborik. Hemsky is a scoring threat in the rare moments he suits up, though, scoring almost a point per game (42 in 47 games in 10-11; 22 in 22 in 09-10) since he broke through with a 77-point campaign in 2005-06.

This is a pivotal campaign for two reasons: 1) he underwent surgery on both of his shoulders and 2) his $4.1 million cap hit will expire after the 2011-12 season. A team – perhaps even the Oilers – might be more willing to roll the dice with Hemsky’s checkered injury-related past if he can play close to 80 games and approach 80 points in the process.

Hemsky tested those surgically repaired shoulders today during the team’s development camp.

To the folks around the league who think Hemsky is injury-prone, all he can do is shrug those refurbished shoulders. He’s played only 69 of 164 games the last two seasons but doesn’t feel like his body is breaking down.

“I’m not worrying about it. It’s only the last two seasons, but before that I don’t think I’ve had many injuries,” said Hemsky, who expects to be ready for the Oilers training camp in mid-September.

Hemsky was back in the Czech Republic in June but will stay here for July to see the medical people and work on his rehabilitation, then head home to skate with the club team in Pardubice for awhile.

“I know to have surgery seems bad, but when you fix the shoulders, they should be OK, now. You get hit, you get a small tear in the shoulder and it’s tearing and tearing and finally it’s torn all the way. For two months you don’t feel it, then you get to where you can’t even sleep. Only thing you can do is go for surgery. I don’t know if I’ll ever have the motion I had before. They’ve tied it up pretty tightly for a hockey player, but it’s good enough for sports. I can play tennis, golf.”

If the Oilers brass (and Hemsky’s agent) get their way, Hemsky won’t have many opportunities to play golf next April.

Tomas Vokoun posts second straight shutout; Strong season could earn him a big deal


If Tomas Vokoun was a MLB pitcher, his teammates might feel compelled to avoid eye contact with him right now.

That’s because the underrated Czech goalie is pitching the netminding equivalent of a no-hitter, as he now has two straight shutouts after bottling up the Tampa Bay Lightning in a 6-0 win for the Florida Panthers. In fact, since having a rough start against the Edmonton Oilers to start the season (allowing three goals on only 13 shots), Vokoun has stopped 89 out of 91 shots in the last three games, good for a staggering 97.8 save percentage.

Shutting out the Calgary Flames is one thing, as that team just isn’t very powerful now that they’re weak at center and Jarome Iginla might be past his prime. Shutting down the red-hot Lightning (especially Maurice Richard Trophy co-winner Steve Stamkos), on the other hand, is pretty impressive.

Vokoun has been a rock in net for years. He might not get much Vezina Trophy consideration because the teams in front of him rarely score enough for him to pile up big win totals, but chew on this impressive stat: Vokun’s save percentage has been at or above 91.9 percent since the 2005-06 season when he was a member of the Nashville Predators. He’s been above 92 percent for three full campaigns, a threshold that indicates truly elite play.

Ultimately, he’s one of the goalies to watch over this season, even if it’s simply because he’ll audition for his last big contract. Vokoun has plenty of motivation to impress potential buyers, too. It’s not just that his contract is expiring, but he’ll also turn 35 by July 2, 2011 which means that he’ll be a 35+ contract. Combine that troubling fact with the brutal 2010 free agent market for goalies and it’s clear that the fantastic Czech will really have to wow people this season to get another nice deal.

Whether it’s with the Panthers or a contender looking for a rock in net during the trade deadline, this is a huge year (and opportunity) for Vokoun. If he keeps playing like this, someone will have to notice. And pay him handsomely.