Tag: contract extensions

R.J. Umberger

Blue Jackets give R.J. Umberger a surprising five-year, $23M extension

For a franchise with zero playoff wins and one postseason appearance in its history, the Columbus Blue Jackets are showing a lot of urgency in keeping the band together. If GM Scott Howson’s job depends on this season’s results as many expect, then his current run of moves would handcuff a hypothetical incoming general manager anyway.

R.J. Umberger is the latest example of keeping more than just the core together, as Howson handed him a surprising five-year, $23 million extension today. The former Philadelphia Flyers forward will register a $4.6 million annual cap hit starting next season. Aaron Portzline reports that the first two seasons (2012-13 and 13-14) include a no-trade clause while the final three carry a modified one.

The salary breakdown is simple:

2012-13: $5 million
Four other seasons: $4.5 million

The Blue Jackets’ roster is now riddled with long-term contracts – and it’s not just obvious players such as franchise winger Rick Nash and newly acquired center Jeff Carter. Here’s a quick look at the team’s big commitments, with their salary cap hits and the season that their contracts expire.

Nash: $7.8 million cap hit, expires 2017-18
Carter: $5.27M, 21-22
Umberger: $4.7M, 16-17
Antoine Vermette: $3.75M, 14-15
James Wisniewski: $5.5M, 16-17
Marc Methot: $3M, 14-15
Fedor Tyutin: $2.84M, 17-18

There are some reasonable values in that grouping – and it’s not as if there is nothing to like about Umberger’s game – but it’s still a risky plan for a team that hasn’t proven anything. On the bright side, the 29-year-old forward is a consistent producer (three straight seasons of 23 goals or more, with two consecutive campaigns of 55+ points) and he can play at both center and wing.

The thing is, when you hand a guy a lengthy deal (and no-trade clause) at that price, there’s probably an expectation for even better things. I’m not sure how much more the Blue Jackets can expect from Umberger, so why couldn’t they get a better bargain for him in exchange for the considerable amount of security he just gained?

Honestly, it’s a head-scratching decision, but it at least accomplishes the task of showing the team’s confidence in their current setup. We’ll find out soon enough if that confidence is justified or ill-advised.

Report: Isles John Tavares and Buffalo’s Tyler Myers both close to signing extensions

John Tavares

Late last night TSN’s Bob McKenzie broke news of how New York Islanders rising star John Tavares and Buffalo Sabres phenom defenseman Tyler Myers are both close to signing contract extensions with their respective teams. Both players are in the final year of their entry level deals this year and after seeing the troubles that some teams are having this summer in re-signing their restricted free agents, getting something done this soon makes a world of sense.

For John Tavares, he sees what’s going on with guys like Drew Doughty, Luke Schenn, and Brad Marchand as well as the arbitration dealings of Shea Weber and doesn’t want to have that distraction heading into what could be a big building year for the Islanders. Arthur Staple of New York Newsday hears it from Tavares himself.

“It’s not something I want hanging over the season and affecting the team,” he said Tuesday after an informal skate at IceWorks in Syosset. “I know I’m going to be here for a long time and I’d like it to get done.”

The numbers are not known; it’s believed that the length of the deal being discussed is in the five- to six-year range. Islanders general manager Garth Snow and Pat Brisson, Tavares’ agent, declined comment on the talks.

Should the Islanders get Tavares locked up to a long-term deal, that would mean they’ve gotten virtually all of their young talent locked in place for the next few seasons. Matt Moulson is signed on for three more years, Michael Grabner signed a five year extension this summer and Kyle Okposo is also locked in place for the next five years.

source: APWhat’s being worked on in Buffalo with Tyler Myers is looking a but juicier than what’s going on with Tavares. While things with the Sabres aren’t imminently close to being done, ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun reports that the framework for Myers’ deal with the Sabres is for seven years at $5.5 million per year.

If those numbers are close to what happens, the Sabres cap situation is going to be fascinating to watch with a new CBA coming next summer. According to CapGeek, if Myers re-upped for $5.5 million per season, their cap situation next season would put the Sabres at just over $55 million with only 16 players signed. If there was a salary cap roll back in place as part of the new labor deal, the Sabres would find themselves in quite the predicament after the monster deals they signed Ville Leino and Christian Ehrhoff to this summer as well as from previous deals to Drew Stafford, Jason Pominville, and Thomas Vanek.

That’s not even digging into the debate as to whether or not Myers is worth that kind of monster deal. That debate can hold off until he’s actually signed.

These two deals getting worked on, however, shows what this summer did for both the players and general managers around the league. With six prominent restricted free agents still working on getting deals done just days before training camp, some players and teams just don’t want to have that distraction heading into next season. For the players, it seems to be working out just fine financially speaking and for the teams, they’re realizing that when the bill comes due and great talent is close to being free they’ve got to pay up to make it happen.

Blue Jackets hand Fedor Tyutin a six-year, $27M extension

Columbus Blue Jackets v Anaheim Ducks

The Columbus Blue Jackets made some big investments during this summer, spending big money to sign offensive defenseman James Wisniewski and sending quite the package to Philadelphia for Jeff Carter. While the team will look different next season, GM Scott Howson decided that one key member from previous campaigns will stay in the fold for the rest of his prime years. The Blue Jackets handed defenseman Fedor Tyutin a six-year extension worth $27 million, which works out to a $4.5 million annual cap hit.

Aaron Portzline reports that Tyutin will have a no-trade clause for the first three seasons of the new deal and then a modified no-trade clause from 2015-16 to 17-18. Portzline reports that the extension’s salary breakdown will look like this:

2012-13: $4 million
13-14: $4.5M
14-15: $4.75M
15-16: $5M
16-17: $4.75M
17-18: $4M

(Note: he’s currently in the final season of a deal that registers a $2.84 million cap hit.)

Tyutin turned 28 in July, which means that he’ll be 29 when that six-year deal kicks in. The all-around defenseman was the Blue Jackets’ leader in time on ice in 2010-11, averaging 22:42 minutes per game. That actually represents a slight decrease in time compared to his other two campaigns in Columbus; he averaged 23:31 minutes per game in both 08-09 and 09-10.

Tyutin scored 34 points with a +1 rating in 08-09 and 32 points with a -7 rating in 09-10 before seeing more downgrades in his numbers last season (27 points with a -12 rating). That being said, his numbers could improve if the team’s offense takes off with the additions of Carter and Wisniewski.

The deal might seem shocking at first because Tyutin isn’t exactly a household name, but he does carry a big workload and is one the Blue Jackets best defensemen in all areas of the ice. My only beef is that he received such a big salary for such a long term – couldn’t Columbus get a little extra relief for giving him six years and the added comfort of a no-trade clause?

Either way, the Blue Jackets aren’t being shy about making bold moves during this off-season. Of course, that go-for-broke mentality might not seem as exciting if the team parts ways with Howson in the near future, but at least the team isn’t stuck in idle mode after some disappointing seasons. If nothing else, they’ll be fascinating to watch next season and Tyutin should be one of their most important players.

Flyers sign budding star James van Riemsdyk to a six-year, $25.5M contract extension

Philadelphia Flyers v New Jersey Devils

The Philadelphia Flyers will have some decisions to make next summer, but one thing they won’t have to worry about is re-signing James van Riemsdyk. The team came to terms on a six-year extension with the budding star today to avoid a prolonged negotiation process next summer, when JVR was primed to become a restricted free agent. David Isaac reports that the six-year total is $25.5 million, which means that his annual salary cap hit will be $4.25 million beginning in the 2012-13 season.

However you might feel about the way the Flyers do business, they’ve shown some solid foresight in wrapping up soon-to-be stars before. They did so in November 2010 when they re-signed Claude Giroux to a three-year contract extension that will pay him just $3.75 million per season. That’s the kind of contract that opens up wiggle room for the team to reinvent itself with splashy moves such as trading Mike Richards and Jeff Carter while giving Ilya Bryzgalov a high-risk contract.

We’ll have to wait and see if this signing is as much of a home run as the Giroux deal. The Flyers are putting a lot of stock in the idea that JVR’s impressive 2011 playoff performances are a sign of a true breakout rather than just a brief run of excellence. No doubt about it, he was downright sensational at times in the postseason; it seemed like he could have scored four goals during his two-goal game against the Boston Bruins in the team’s overtime Game 2 defeat.

JVR needs to keep firing away

If you ask me, it could come down to confidence, which might be most tangibly illustrated by the staggering difference in the amounts of shots he put on net in the playoffs versus the regular season. In 75 regular season games in 2010-11, JVR scored 21 goals on 173 shots (2.31 shots per game). In 11 playoff games, he scored seven goals and put a dizzying 70 shots on net, which comes out to about 6.36 shots per game.

It’s not realistic to expect him to maintain that pace over 70+ games, but if he can hit somewhere around four shots per game, it’s not crazy to expect a 30 goal season in 2011-12. Hopefully he’ll share the vulcanized rubber with teammates every now and then, though; he didn’t register a single assist during his impressive 2011 playoff run.

Following in Bobby Ryan’s footsteps

JVR was part of a watershed moment for USA Hockey, as he went second overall behind fellow American-born winger Patrick Kane in the 2007 NHL Entry Draft. The Chicago Blackhawks reaped immediate rewards from their top pick while the Flyers have been patient with van Riemsdyk’s development process, bringing him along slowly as he debuted with the team in 2009-10. In a way, his path is reminiscent of fellow U.S.-born second overall pick Bobby Ryan; the impressive power forwards may always be “the guys who were drafted after Sidney Crosby/Kane” but their teams’ patience is paying off on the ice and on accounting spreadsheets as well.


Philly now has 16 players and about $51.3 million in cap commitments for the 2012-13 season, with Jaromir Jagr, Jakub Voracek, Matt Carle and Braydon Coburn ranking as their most prominent pending free agents next summer. The latter three will represent some tough choices for the Flyers, but they took care of their biggest concern today.

The Flyers’ investment is clearly based on their internal projections that JVR is primed to be a star. Every indication is that they were right about making a similar decision with Giroux, so this could be another huge move for the long-term viability of the franchise. There are always risks involved with these types of moves – especially when it comes to contracts as lengthy as these – but overall it looks like both sides won big.

Ducks hand coach Randy Carlyle a three-year contract extension

Anaheim Ducks v San Jose Sharks

There are plenty of teams that seem unpredictable heading into the 2011-12 season, but the Anaheim Ducks might be the toughest to gauge.

On one hand, they have the best trio of power forwards in the league: 2011 Hart Trophy winner Corey Perry, outstanding center Ryan Getzlaf and still-improving American winger Bobby Ryan. The Ducks also have explosive offensive defensemen in Lubomir Visnovsky and Cam Fowler (who just completed an impressive rookie season).

The problem is that the Ducks’ question marks are just as big as their burly, high-scoring forwards. Their defense ranged from mediocre to awful last season and it didn’t get much better during the summer. (In fact, hard-shooting defenseman Kurtis Foster might be a downgrade from Andy Sutton – at least in the Ducks’ end.) Of course, the biggest problem is that goalie Jonas Hiller’s vertigo issues seem unresolved. If you ask me, Hiller deserves consideration among the NHL’s most valuable goalies because of all the leaks he plugs with his leg pads. The Ducks might also have even more trouble providing secondary scoring if Teemu Selanne retires.

In other words, Ducks head coach Randy Carlyle has his hands full. On the bright side, contract worries won’t be at the top of his mind, though; the team handed him a contract extension that runs through the 2013-14 season today. It’s technically a three-year extension, although the 2011-12 season will be part of the deal. Financial terms haven’t been disclosed.

Carlyle has enjoyed a great run behind the Ducks’ bench, which you can see from this summary from the team.

Carlyle, 55 (4/19/56), was named the seventh head coach in team history on Aug. 1, 2005 and has since led the Ducks to their first Stanley Cup championship (2007), Pacific Division championship (2007) and five playoff appearances in six seasons (2005-09, 2011). Only one NHL coach has won more postseason games than Carlyle’s 36 since 2005-06 (Mike Babcock). Carlyle has the most wins and highest winning percentage in Ducks history, compiling a 266-169-57 record in 492 regular season contests (.599 winning percentage).

There were some who were calling for Carlyle’s head early last season when the team got off to a very slow start, but the Ducks stood by him and it paid off with a breathtaking run to the playoffs. The Ducks have provided him with some nice talent over the years, but his track record is still very impressive considering the rigors of the Pacific Division and Western Conference.

That being said, the 2011-12 season could be his toughest test yet. If he can get this talented but deeply flawed Ducks team to the playoffs again, then he deserves every undisclosed penny he’ll receive.