Tag: Commodore 64

Columbus Blue Jackets v Atlanta Thrashers

Commodore 64 no more: Mike Commodore will wear No. 22 instead

This afternoon brought the end of two summertime sagas for the NHL.

The first constituted “real news” as the New York Rangers tidied up the last bit of work they needed to do this summer, signing Ryan Callahan to a three-year deal worth $12.85 million. The second bit probably qualifies as pure fluff for the easily unamused: instead of delighting nostalgic video gamers by paying tribute to the Commodore 64, Mike Commodore will wear No. 22 instead during the 2011-12 season.

Commodore explained his logic on Twitter, writing that playing for the Detroit Red Wings is a “special thing” and for that reason, he wants to wear a number that is special to him. He also seemingly tied up the loose ends that came with the charitable drive organized by Puck Daddy’s Greg Wyshynski by claiming that he will match the pledges although he wasn’t certain about which charity would receive the donations.

There’s little doubt that Commodore has some strong memories of wearing No. 22. He wore No. 2 during part of his brief stay with the New Jersey Devils and became well-known with the single digit version during the Calgary Flames’ Cinderella run to the Stanley Cup finals. Commodore then wore No. 22 with the Carolina Hurricanes from 2006-2008, where he won a Stanley Cup. A trade to the Ottawa Senators prompted him to briefly wear No. 44, but he switched back to 22 during three rocky years with the Columbus Blue Jackets. (Jersey history via hockey-reference.com.)

Seeing Commodore in No. 64 probably would have been worth a few giggles here and there, but once the joke got old he might have regretted giving in to peer pressure. As long as Commodore makes sure that the charitable end is taken care of, we can look at this as an amusing story that didn’t really need to come to fruition.

It might have cost the NHL a little money in merchandise sales, but the Winnipeg Jets should make up that difference by a pretty healthy margin.

Mike Commodore 64: Commodore USA president would be ‘ecstatic’ if it happened

Mike Commodore, Eric Fehr

The momentum keeps building for Mike Commodore to appease the nostalgic video gaming masses by donning the No. 64 as a member of the Detroit Red Wings. Puck Daddy’s Greg Wyshynski deserves a great deal of credit for bringing the situation to the hockey world’s attention and also organizing a charitable drive to encourage Commodore 64 to become a reality. Sure, there are some who have voiced their dissent for the idea, but the consensus (of those who care at all) points toward it being a crowd-pleaser.

Wyshynski points out at least one prominent person who voiced his approval for the idea: Barry Altman, the president and CEO of Commodore USA. Altman must have sensed that dormant nostalgia for the Commodore 64 a little bit earlier than anyone else, because he resurrected the brand (only with modern bells and whistles) on April 5.

To what should probably be little surprise, Altman seems delighted by the free publicity and would be even happier if Commodore ends up wearing that number.

“I can’t even think of words to describe how ecstatic we would be,” said Barry Altman, president and chief executive of Commodore USA.

Altman seems primed to capitalize on the opportunity, if the NHL will allow it and Commodore embraces it. He seems to be taking a wise business approach by simply leaving it up to those parties to determine how much the computer company ends up being connected to the situation.

“This is really a grassroots adventure, where the fans have come together and realized that the name, the company, the franchise and our company all have reached a perfect storm,” Altman said. “If, in fact, he feels comfortable wearing that jersey, the No. 64, obviously it would thrill everyone when he hit the ice.”

Altman said his company has no formal agreement with Commodore, and is not sure how the NHL would embrace the combination, business-wise. It is not believed there are any league rules that would prohibit a partnership between the player and the company.

“We are eagerly awaiting his decision,” Altman said. “We’ve envisioned supporting them in any way that’s comfortable for everybody -Commodore giveaways, Commodore nights, Commodore T-shirts. Again, this is all up to the team, and all up to Mike. Whatever they decide, we’re going to roll with it.”

One could see things getting a little out of hand if Commodore actually became an official endorser of the product (worst nightmare: a tattoo of the old computer, maybe?). That being said, you can’t really blame Altman for trying to take it that far, but we’ll have to wait and see if he even ends up wearing No. 64 anyway. If nothing else, it’s an amusing sideshow during the slow, hockey-free months of summer.

Red Wings name Blashill, Peters as assistants; pressure builds for ‘Commodore 64’ to happen

Mike Cvik, Mike Commodore

Here’s a bit of news from the oft-interesting world of the Detroit Red Wings.

As we speculated earlier, one of them is Jeff Blashill. Blashill is the former head coach for Western Michigan and also coached the USHL’s Indiana Ice after assistant coaching stints with Miami of Ohio and Ferris State. Blashill called Friday an “emotional day” and stated that he is “excited for the opportunity to pursue a lifelong dream to coach in the NHL with the best organization in sports.”

Bill Peters will be the other Red Wings assistant. He spent three seasons with the Rockford Ice Hogs, the Chicago Blackhawks’ AHL affiliate. Peters compiled a 122-97-7-14 record in that time and also won a Memorial Cup with the Spokane Chiefs in 2007-08.

Puck Daddy promised to pledge $64 to Commodore’s favorite charity if he made the number change and encouraged others to do the same, raising a reported $3,456 (and counting?) if people stay true to their words and Commodore’s charity accepts the donations. Commodore discussed the possibility with Greg Wyshynski today.

About that decision: Commodore emailed us on Thursday to let us know a few things: His Twitter account was “blowing up” because of the campaign; he needs to talk to the Wings about the number, seeing as how he’s only spoken to Mike Babcock and Ken Holland so far and we doubt pop culture references to obsolete computers came up; and that he admitted “now there is pressure” on him to follow through.

This wouldn’t be the first time a professional athlete evokes video game nostalgia, but let’s hope that things end up better for Commodore than they did for troubled Cincinnati Bengals defensive back Adam “Pacman” Jones and marginalized Green Bay Packers safety Atari Bigby.