Tag: coaching change

Jacques Martin

Another coach bites the dust: Montreal fires Jacques Martin


Another day, another head coach fired.

The Montreal Canadiens have fired Jacques Martin after two and a half seasons with the team. The team did not announce the hiring of a new full-time coach immediately and named Randy Cunneyworth the team’s interim head coach. Larry Carrière becomes the new assistant coach under Cunneyworth to fill out the staff.

With Montreal having a coaching vacancy, their hunt for a new coach is one that works differently than the other 29 teams in the league. The Habs will look for the best qualified coach who is fluent in both French and English so as to better deal with everything in Montreal.

Two names that instantly come to mind immediately that fit that description: Michel Therrien and Bob Hartley. The Canadiens’ AHL coach in Hamilton, Clement Jodoin, could also be in the mix.

With the amount of talent there is in Montreal and the lack of performance we’ve seen out of them under Martin, you have to wonder what took GM Pierre Gauthier so long to pull the trigger. In the meantime, the Canadiens have seen homegrown coaches Guy Boucher and Kirk Muller escape Montreal’s system for other NHL head coaching jobs. Don’t suppose Montreal would like a do-over there, do you?

Report: Terry Murray could be fired this week

Terry Murray

Terry Murray’s days coaching the L.A. Kings may be at an end.

According to a report in the Los Angeles Times from Helene Elliott and Lisa Dillman, Kings executives are looking to remove Murray from the head job in an effort to kick start a team that’s looked disinterested of late and one that just can’t score.

Murray’s moves to make the Kings a more defensively tough team have paid off but it appears their offense was sacrificed to make it happen as they’re last in the league  in goals scored per game. General manager Dean Lombardi didn’t comment on any of the latest goings on, but after spending to near the cap and adding Mike Richards and Simon Gagne while paying up big to Anze Kopitar and Drew Doughty, he has to be furious at seeing his team playing so poorly.

The Kings have fallen back into a tie for 11th in the Western Conference with their recent downturn and for a team that has hopes of making a deep run in the playoffs and looking at a shot at the Stanley Cup, something’s got to give. As for who the Kings are looking at to replace Murray, the L.A. Times report says they haven’t found someone suitable.

If you’re thinking that Kings assistant and former Flyers head coach John Stevens is the logical next step, he’s viewed as being too similar to Murray in both style and demeanor. He could fill in as an interim head coach until the Kings find their guy, but he won’t be a long term solution.

Bruce Boudreau talks to the media in Anaheim

Bruce Boudreau

It only took about twelve hours for Randy Carlyle to be fired, Bruce Boudreau to be hired, and for the new coach to meet with the media in Anaheim. Pro Hockey Talk was there as Boudreau addressed the media, talked about his expectations for the rest of the season, and the Ducks players should still expect to make a run at the playoffs.

Here’s the transcript of Bruce Boudreau’s portion of the press conference:

Boudreau statement:

“It’s great to be here. It’s been a wild ride for me for the last week as well. Like Bob said, I sat there on Tuesday and I didn’t believe that this was a team that had the possibilities and the makings of something special, I think I would have sat at home and waited. But I don’t think opportunities like this come around every day with the talent we have here. I talked to my wife about it, I said: ‘I think we should jump at this.’ I know it’s only been a day basically since I got let go, it was something that I thought was a chance that I wouldn’t get again. So, I jumped at it and got in the plane yesterday, and here I am. It’s a new start, I’m looking forward to it, can’t wait to play, and let’s get going.”

Boudreau: “Salvaging the season is winning regularly. Every team has its warts; it’s a question of making less mistakes than the other team. I know it’s very basic, but we don’t get a chance, and I didn’t get a chance, to see Anaheim play as often as I’d like to being a) in the Eastern time zone, and b) the Eastern Conference; we didn’t pay that much attention to them. I do know a few of their players and I do know that they have some great players. They have the players in really prominent role positions that need to be to be a good team. So, not taking anything away from Randy [Carlyle], if we do it together, we should hopefully make strides. Every night and every day. And it’s going to take time, but I think it could be done within the next four months.

On the circumstances being very similar to when Boudreau took over the Caps, memories of first days and months when he took over Caps:

Boudreau: “I think the biggest thing I tried to instill in the Capitals was confidence. They were beaten down a little bit and they had lost for many years. They didn’t believe in themselves. This is a totally different story in that respect, is that they haven’t lost. They have been a really good team. They have just sort of lost their way a little bit. But I told them this morning, I believe in them. I think they’re a really good team and I wouldn’t have done this if I didn’t believe that they have a really good shot of doing a lot of good things this year. I want them to believe in themselves. If they do, then good things can happen.”

On the Bobby Ryan rumors that have been floating around this week:

Boudreau: “I just got here. I haven’t paid too much attention to that. I’ll let the first day go before I address [the rumors]. You know, [I need to] talk to Bobby…

On his reputation of being an offensive coach and will he have defensemen jumping into the play?

Boudreau: “I don’t know. I’d like to walk before I can run a little bit. It doesn’t really matter if you win 8-7 or 2-1, I just want to win. If you know me, losing grates on me quite a lot. But I think it’s assessing where your strengths are, then work to your strengths.”

On the comments that said Boudreau had nothing left in the tank in Washington:

Boudreau: “No, I had told George [McPhee] that I had tried everything that I knew with this group right now and it wasn’t working right now. It didn’t mean that it wouldn’t work a week from now, it just didn’t work right then—for those two games I was talking about. It was the Buffalo game and the Winnipeg game. And that hadn’t happened in the previous 4+ years that I was there, so it was more of a surprise for me that it hadn’t worked. I was sort of taken aback by it and I told George that.”

About extracting Carlyle’s philosophies and instilling his own with the Ducks:

Boudreau: “Well, I just do what I do. I can’t say we’re not doing this. Randy is a great coach, good teammate, good friend—all of those things. But I just got to do what I’ve done and what I’ve been used to; what I’ve done has been successful. And those are the things that I know. So we integrate those things, we did a couple of things today. Systems—there’s no right system or wrong system. Coaches have faith in what they’ve done and has been successful for them. What I was doing today [at practice] may have been different from what Randy did, but at the same time, they were both successful. We’ll see if the group can do it, whether it was better for them what I’m showing or it isn’t and we’ll adjust accordingly. I mean, I’ve been with them for one practice, so we’ll see their strengths and their weakness. I just can’t go on and do things that aren’t me. I just have to be me and see how that works.”

On the mood of the team this morning:

Boudreau: “Like all team, when there’s a change, they’re waiting to see how it affects them. It’s hard to tell. They listened very well, I thought, and they looked [like] when they went on the ice they had some ‘jump.’ But I don’t know them individually well enough to know if that was the norm or if it was a different thing for them. Time will tell. But I thought, for me, it was OK.”

On everything moving quickly over the last week, if he would have hung around the house for a while:

Boudreau: “Oh, my wife wouldn’t have liked that very much. No, I was looking for something to do. It’s always important, for me anyway, to get out. I can’t lie around and [not] do anything. I was going to start watching games somewhere, going somewhere. At that time, I was making plans to go to Toronto and do some work with TSN or something. But, this was much better.”

On if any other teams contacted him (or the Capitals about him):

Boudreau: “No, not that I know of. Not with the Capitals, not that I know of; with me no.”

On which place was furthest way from Anaheim:

Boudreau: “…boy, I’ve been everywhere. I don’t know. Just distance-wise, Manchester was the furthest. But when I first started getting into coaching, when you’re coaching in Muskegon, Michigan or Biloxi, Mississippi, you really aren’t looking far enough ahead to think that you’re going to be coaching in Anaheim or Washington. I’ve been lucky.”

On the month (November) starting with his Capitals facing off with the Ducks:

Boudreau: “No, quite frankly I wouldn’t have laid [money on it]. If you could have a crystal ball, this wouldn’t have been something I thought was going to happen.”

On if he’s spoken to Randy Carlyle:

Boudreau: “No. It’s too early.”

On filling the coaching staff out:

Boudreau: “I think we’ll talk to Bob when this is done and we’ll see where it goes.”

GM Bob Murray: “We have some things in the fire that may happen fairly quickly.”

On how he can prevent the players from tuning him out:

Boudreau: “If I knew how to prevent it, I wouldn’t let it happen. So I just hope it doesn’t happen. I hope that they buy into the message and we just surge from here.”

On what his message is to the players:

Boudreau: “I want them to be very positive. I want to be aggressive, I want them to play the way they’re capable of playing. With energy and thinking that they’re going to be successful. The way they should be successful. This was a team that before the season started, if you read a lot of the clippings, they said they would really contend for the Pacific Division crown, and I think they’re very capable of doing it. I want them to believe in themselves. That’s the message for today. Believe in themselves.”

On Ryan/Getzlaf/Perry being linemates going forward:

Boudreau: “The first shift tomorrow they will be. Beyond that, we’ll have to see how they do.”

On any lessons he could take away from the Ovechkin/Semin stuff that went down over the last month in Washington:

Boudreau: “You know what; I mean a lot was blown out [of proportion]. I got along really well with both of those guys and I think I’ve said that for the last week that there was never a problem. With either one. But we all tend to want to make something out of nothing. And we did. So there’s really no story there.”

On the excitement to get started:

Boudreau: “I think nervous excitement goes hand-in-hand. I’m excited, don’t get me wrong. Any time you take a new challenge on, you get excited. And nervous. I’m trying to put a good analogy together—it’s like going to a new school. You want to put your first step, you want to make a good impression with everybody. And you’re following someone who had a lot of success and is really popular. So it’s tough.”

Capitals fire Bruce Boudreau, name Dale Hunter new head coach

Bruce Boudreau

The Capitals were in desperate need of a change, and now they’ve got it. Bruce Boudreau is out as head coach, fired by the team this morning and replaced by former Capitals captain and tough guy Dale Hunter.

The move comes after speculation ran hot last night that a potential move was coming thanks to a report from Sportsnet’s Nick Kypreos. Turns out Kypreos had it right and now the Capitals, who have been mired in an awful funk all season, will get the change they’ve been in need of since last season.

Hunter comes in in the same position Boudreau was in when he was named head coach of the Capitals years ago in that he’s never been a coach in the NHL. Instead, Hunter comes via junior hockey where he was the owner and head coach of the OHL’s London Knights. Much like Brent Sutter in Calgary, Hunter will put aside his ownership duties to coach in the NHL. Sutter is owner of the Red Deer Rebels in the WHL.

This time, however, Hunter comes into a situation where the Capitals absolutely have to get things turned around. Alex Ovechkin has slumped all season long and his scoring numbers have fallen off hard, Alex Semin leads the team in penalties rather than being anywhere near the top in goals, and the defense and goaltending have been sub-par to put it nicely. Hunter comes in with one designation from his playing days: He’s the one captain of the Capitals that led the team to a Stanley Cup finals appearance.

Adding to all that, the team just appeared to not enjoy playing hockey anymore. If Hunter coaches at all the same way as he played, business is about to pick up in a big way in D.C. One thing is for sure, Hunter’s got a lot of work to do get these Capitals back to normal. If a change at the top is all that they needed to make it happen, GM George McPhee will be the smartest guy in the world.

Babcock excited for protégé Paul MacLean’s opportunity

Paul MacLean

Tonight’s opening night game between the Detroit Red Wings and the Ottawa Senators was more than just a game between a Stanley Cup contender and a contender for the #1 overall pick in the 2012 Draft. For the men behind the bench, it was an opportunity for Paul MacLean to show what he could do in his first head coaching gig. Behind the Red Wings’ bench, it was a chance to see one of their own trying to make the most of the biggest break of his career.

The bad news is that MacLean had to face his former team in his first game as the Senators’ new head coach. After falling behind 5-0, the overmatched Sens managed to make the final score a much more respectable 5-3 final score. The good news is that MacLean and the rest of the boys in Ottawa won’t have to face Detroit again until next season.

For MacLean, the first game as head coach was the culmination of a long road in the coaching world. After a successful coaching with Mike Babcock in Detroit, he was only a matter of time before he got his opportunity. MacLean explains:

“It’s pretty satisfying to get the opportunity to be a head coach in the National Hockey League. A lot of it has to do with being on a successful team and knowing what it takes to be successful in this League. Todd has done a great job in San Jose getting his team further and making it better and that’s the challenge for me — to do that here in Ottawa, as well.”

When listing people to thank, Babcock should be at the top of the pile. Not only had Babcock given him jobs in both Anaheim and Detroit, but he’s groomed the new Sens bench boss to be a head coach himself one day. There’s a key advantage when a head coach prepares his assistants to move onto better things one day. Just ask Todd McLellan for the Sharks.

Red Wings’ coach Mike Babcock holds no ill-will for MacLean moving onto Ottawa. In fact, quite the opposite. Babcock explains that when assistant coaches get promotions around the league, it’s a source of pride for himself and the organization:

“I’m a big believer that the best CEOs in the country… their people move on and do things. Some people stifle people and don’t let them grow and there’s no succession plan. I don’t believe in that. I believe that not just for players, but for coaches, it speaks highly of your organization if people are growing and developing and moving on. I’m proud of it. I’ve got lots of guys who I’ve coached with who are coaches now. I’m proud of that fact. To me, that’s what it’s all about.”

MacLean is certainly walking into a difficult situation this season. The Sens are trying to mix in prospects with potential, strong AHL players, and aging NHL stars. Last season they were one of the worst teams in the Eastern Conference and most people have them picked to finish at the bottom of the Northeast Division this season. MacLean will have his work cut out for him if he wants to follow in Mike Babcock and Todd McLellan’s successful footsteps.

For now, he’s just excited for his opportunity. So is his former boss.