Tag: coach hirings

Randy Carlyle

Randy Carlyle is the new Toronto Maple Leafs head coach


Call it another example of loyalty or merely familiarity, but definitely call it official: Brian Burke has made Randy Carlyle the new coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs. Carlyle will replace Ron Wilson, who was relieved of his duties Friday evening.

Carlyle and Burke were together in Anaheim, where they won the franchise’s only Stanley Cup in 2006-07 before Burke pursued his dream gig in Toronto.

Carlyle’s time with Anaheim

Carlyle will bring a different voice to the Toronto locker room because he’s more of a “taskmaster” type — an act that some would say eventually wore thin with the Ducks. Still, it’s tough to argue with his results as he compiled a 273-182-61 record (the most wins in franchise history) during his seven seasons as Anaheim’s head coach.

Burke’s big gamble

This is a bold move to a) help Burke protect his own job and b) stop the bleeding and make good on the franchise’s best chance to break its post-lockout playoff hex.


The irony of this situation is that Carlyle and the man he’s replacing, Wilson, were turfed a short while after signing extensions. Carlyle re-upped with the Ducks this past summer but was canned on Nov. 30; Wilson was extended earlier this season (though he infamously announced the news on Christmas Day) but was fired with 18 games left in the regular season.

— Six degrees of separation: Wilson, Carlyle and Bruce Boudreau (who replaced Carlyle in Anaheim) all played together on the 1977-78 Maple Leafs. Carlyle becomes the 16th man to have both played for the Maple Leafs and then taken on the reins as the team’s coach.

— This move reunites Carlyle with All-Star Joffrey Lupul, who’s enjoying a fantastic season in Toronto. Lupul was traded away twice during Carlyle’s tenure in Anaheim and their relationship wasn’t great:

“You want to prove people wrong,” he said. “(Carlyle) didn’t give me any opportunity on left wing. His words to me were, ‘You’re not able to play left wing in this league.’ It’s something I’ve worked on since I got to Toronto, and now I feel more comfortable on left than I ever was on right.”

Told of Lupul’s post-trade sentiments, Carlyle smiled: “Players make comments. It’s not up to management or coaches to throw any dirt one way or the other.

— Burke and Carlyle will address the media on Saturday at 10am ET.

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Ducks fire Randy Carlyle, hire Bruce Boudreau

Bruce Boudreau

Anaheim Ducks fans clamoring for a big change got their wish, but that huge alteration won’t come in the form of a Bobby Ryan trade – at least not yet. Instead, the team made a stunning decision by replacing Randy Carlyle with Bruce Boudreau. (Oddly enough, the Ducks front page currently has a photo of an angry Boudreau, which is probably the opposite of how he’s feeling right now..)

Here’s what Ducks GM Bob Murray said about the move:

“This was an extremely difficult decision,” Murray said. “Randy is a terrific head coach, and did a tremendous job for us for six-plus seasons. We thank him greatly for his hard work and dedication to our franchise, not the least of which was a Stanley Cup championship. At this time, we simply felt a new voice was needed. Bruce is a proven winner with a great track record, and we are optimistic we can turn this season around under his leadership.”

A quick look at Boudreau in Anaheim

Talk about a speedy turnaround. Boudreau was fired by the Washington Capitals on Monday and didn’t even go a full week without getting another NHL head coaching gig. Then again, speed is the name of the game with Boudreau; the Caps’ best moments came when they attacked with reckless velocity and the expressive head coach recently became the fastest to 200 wins. (Boudreau’s overall record is 201-88-40.)

From a personnel standpoint, this decision makes a ton of sense. If it’s safe to assume that Boudreau might go back to a wide-open style, then he will get the chance to deploy an arsenal of dangerous offensive weapons. Ryan Getzlaf, Corey Perry and (hopefully) Ryan form a core of prodigious scoring talents while Teemu Selanne should pump in his typically staggering amount of goals. The team also features a few nice scoring options from the blueline, so maybe Boudreau could help Lubomir Visnovsky and Cam Fowler produce some serious magic. (Kurtis Foster’s booming shot might be useful, as well.)

The Ducks have traditionally hung Jonas Hiller out to dry and it’s unlikely that Boudreau will do what a former Norris Trophy winner couldn’t completely manage, but the potential bump in goal support might make a big difference anyway.

A glance at Carlyle

Much like Paul Maurice, Carlyle was saddled with a top-heavy roster and usually made the most of it. Carlyle has one serious trump card over Maurice, though: that 2007 Stanley Cup ring. With that in mind, it wouldn’t be shocking if he lands on his feet … although one would imagine he’ll take a little longer than Boudreau.


So what do you think? Is this a smart hire by the Ducks or a step in the wrong direction? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Need a new head coach? Root against Bruce Boudreau’s Washington Capitals

2011 NHL Winter Classic Practice

At this very moment in time, Bruce Boudreau’s hold over the Washington Capitals head coaching job might be the safest it has been all season long. Yet if you’ve paid even a faint amount of attention to the NHL playoffs – even just the Capitals’ series during the Alex Ovechkin era – you know that a team’s fortunes can turn on a dime.

After all, the Caps held a 3-1 lead over the Montreal Canadiens in their 2010 first round series before Jaroslav Halak switched bodies with ’90s Dominik Hasek for about a month. For all the justifiable talk about the changes Washington made during their transition from a runaway offensive train to a standard issue defensive team, their margin of error has been paper thin. Besides, if any goalie can duplicate Halak’s magical run, it’s all-world New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist.

Although I think the Capitals would likely make an error if they booted bellicose Bruce Boudreau out the door if the team fails in the playoffs, that doesn’t mean it cannot happen. That would be a sad day for many (not just for DC-area Baskin Robbins shops), but one team’s firing is another team’s potential genius hire.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at how Boudreau would fit in with the NHL teams currently looking to fill some coaching vacancies (in alphabetical order).

Dallas – Sure, the Stars have ownership issues and probably won’t have Brad Richards next season. Even so, the team has some building blocks in place for Boudreau to institute an attacking offense, especially if Jamie Benn continues his ascent as the next big thing at the power forward position.

From a selfish perspective, it would also be hilarious to watch Boudreau gain approximately 3,000 lbs. after gorging on BBQ and Tex-Mex food.

Florida – Boudreau isn’t that far removed from his days as an AHL coach; the Panthers aren’t that far removed from being an AHL team. All kidding aside, this team needs a new identity, so why not bring in a style that might actually appeal to casual sports fans?

Boudreau might have to pretend he has a deep connection to the Chicago Blackhawks franchise to get on GM Dale Tallon’s good side, though.

Minnesota – If the Wild really want to shed the label of being a yawn-inducing, trapping team, then hiring Boudreau would be the best way to accomplish that task. They already have a ringer for Mike Green in Brent Burns, although the team might need to convince Burns to get a bad hair cut to drive the point home.

New Jersey – On first impact, one might ask: “Aren’t the Devils a defense first, second and third team?”

It seems that way, but one cannot help but wonder if such a paradigm only works with a mastermind like Jacques Lemaire. After all, looking at their roster, it’s not like they have a bunch of Scott Stevens-types on their blueline.

If the Devils can retain Zach Parise, it might be time to re-cast the squad as a more offensively dangerous group. Besides, Boudreau connected with a defensively indifferent, frequently shooting Russian left wing in Washington … why couldn’t he do it with Ilya Kovalchuk in Newark?

Ottawa – “Cloudy” Cory Clouston* was fired for two main reasons: 1) he missed the playoffs and 2) he rubbed many players the wrong way.

If Eugene Melnyk and Bryan Murray believe that they should go with a polar opposite to Clouston, why not try go with a lovable, profane type in Boudreau? Something tells me Jason Spezza and Sergei Gonchar would be happy campers, if nothing else.

* – I made this nickname up on the spot. Could you tell?


Anyway, it’s obvious that Boudreau’s job is safe, at the moment. Yet if Boudreau stumbles and the Capitals decide to can him, the above teams should seriously consider giving him a shot.

If nothing else, he wouldn’t be boring.