Tag: clearing waivers

Colin White, Trent Hunter

Trent Hunter and Colin White clear waivers; How the inevitable buyouts will affect all sides

The New Jersey Devils made a brilliant move when they sent Brian Rolston’s $5.06 million salary cap hit (and a conditional draft pick) in exchange for injured New York Islanders forward Trent Hunter. At the time, the savings seemed simple: the Devils received +3.06 million in space in 2011-12 and then would take on Hunter’s $2 million in 12-13. Either way, it seemed like a great way to clear up space for Zach Parise.

While the Devils did indeed find a way to get Parise to come back for at least one more year (at $6 million), GM Lou Lamoriello decided to tidy his team’s salary structure up a bit more. As Joe speculated when the Devils placed Hunter and Colin White on waivers, the duo of players did indeed clear waivers and thus seem primed for a buyout in the near future. Lamoriello himself admitted that would be the case on Monday. (We’ll update this post once it becomes official.)

Here’s a quick review of what each buyout will cost the Devils and how much they’ll receive in savings.

White, 33, has one year left on his contract at $3 million. The buyout cap hit for White will be $1 million for each of the next two seasons.

Hunter, 31, has two years at $2 million per season remaining. The buyout cap hit for Hunter will be $666,667 for each of the next four seasons.

Robust cap space for the Devils

So White and Hunter will cost the Devils $1.67 million for the next two seasons and then Hunter’s penalty will be $667K for two more. On the other hand, New Jersey sees significant cap relief this season; they’ll save approximately $3.33 million by essentially paying White and Hunter to go away.

If that buyout takes place, the Devils would have $5.87 million in excess cap space, according to Cap Geek. With the free agent market as slim as it is right now, I imagine that cap flexibility will be more beneficial around the trade deadline than anything else.

What’s next for Hunter, White

As far as the two players being bought out, both White and Hunter told Colin Stephenson of the Newark Star-Ledger that they want to find an NHL job.

White might be the saddest of the two, considering the fact that he’s been with the Devils organization since they drafted him in 1996. White was a useful member of the 2000 and 2003 Stanley Cup winning teams and while he has his flaws and limitations, his crease-clearing ways might convince a team to add him as a depth defenseman. There might be some questions about injuries here and there, but it wouldn’t be shocking if someone decided to give the sizable 33-year-old blueliner a chance.

Trent Hunter might have a tougher go of it, although he’s only 31 years old. Injuries have been the biggest problem for Hunter, who only played in 133 out of 246 regular season games during the last three seasons, scoring 37 points in that span. Those are the numbers of a player who barely belongs at the NHL level, but Hunter does have 25 and 20 goal seasons to his name, so maybe he can convince a team to give him one last chance. (Or at least a training camp tryout?)

With those buyout amounts already going their way, Hunter and White could be willing to take bargain deals to stay in the NHL. We’ll see how that it goes, but it could be far more interesting to follow what the devious Devils have planned with their suddenly robust cap space.

Flames winger Niklas Hagman clears waivers, is Calgary ready to make a move?

NHL Heritage Classic - Montreal Canadiens v Calgary Flames

While it’s highly doubtful that this confirms some rather random Vincent Lecavalier trade talk, Bob McKenzie reports that Calgary Flames forward Niklas Hagman cleared waivers today.

Hagman’s full annual cap hit is $3 million, although the Flames’ savings will be prorated at this point. Again, it’s hard to believe that Calgary could manage a move on the Lecavalier level, but it certainly opens the door for a more reasonable swap.

Arik James of Matchsticks & Gasoline backs up the reflexive notion that Hagman was placed on waivers for salary cap flexibility, pointing out that the move would be pointless outside of that context since the team wouldn’t be likely to improve itself with a call-up.

As of right now the Calgary Flames can afford a $4.58M cap hit at the trade deadline (all salary numbers, of course, from Capgeek). That’s certainly not awful, and could lend itself to taking on salary or picking up a solid player. But say Jay Feaster wants to make a couple moves. Say he gets plenty of offers thrown at him and decides to take more than a couple (for better or worse)–we really don’t have the cap space for that. Or maybe he wants to target a super star–first, there’s the hope that Hagman’s salary is just gone straight up: someone claims him.

Here lies the problem however: if the Flames were to send Niklas Hagman down to the Heat immediately upon clearing waivers and the potential trade or trades fell through–they’d need him back, putting him on re-entry waivers.

This leaves the Flames with the very high risk of Hagman getting picked up at $1.5M per for the rest of this season and all of the next. And that’s rough–paying for a player who is no longer on your roster in any way, shape or form in both salary and cap space.

So what will the Flames do? The solution is actually quite elegant: place Niklas Hagman on waivers now, but don’t reassign him until the cap space is absolutely needed. The reassignment period lasts for a total of 30 days or 10 games, whichever comes first, enabling Jay Feaster to wait to reassign Hagman until the capspace is absolutely necessary.

With that, we’ll just have to wait and see what kind of moves Feaster makes with that extra cap space.

Petr Prucha signs with KHL while Kyle Wellwood leaves Russia for the Blues


It’s almost as if the KHL traded away walking fat joke Kyle Wellwood for middling forward Petr Prucha, even if it’s a coincidence. Puck Daddy’s Dmitry Chesnokov reports that the KHL’s SKA St. Petersburg signed Prucha after he was waived by the Phoenix Coyotes while the St. Louis Blues are hoping Wellwood will clear waivers this afternoon so he can join the team.

SKA St. Petersburg seems like a clearing house for former NHL talent. Their current roster includes Maxim Afinogenov, Evgeny Artyukhin, Sergei Brylin, Petr Cajanek, Denis Grebeshkov, Vitaly Vishnevski, Alexei Yashin and Sergei Zubov. The team also previously employed Evgeni Nabokov. (They also have a guy named Denis Denisov on their team, which is pretty funny.)

Neither Prucha nor Wellwood are impact players, but both guys have their fair share of fans. Prucha only managed one assist in 11 games so far this season while Wellwood was averaging a little under nine minutes per game with eight points in 25 games for Atlant in the KHL.

Report: Michael Leighton clears waivers, will play in AHL (for now)

Tim Brent, Darroll Powe

It’s easy to empathize with Michael Leighton.

After all, it seems like he’s a victim of bad timing – or the eternal state of upheaval that is the Philadelphia Flyers’ goalie positions – more than anything else. After securing a new two-year, $3 million contract thanks to his stunning run to the Stanley Cup finals, the former Carolina Hurricanes product required off-season surgery in September.

That injury cleared the way for the unexpected rise of rookie Sergei Bobrovsky, who just recently seems to be on his way back to Earth (not surprisingly, this began around the time Chris Pronger went on the injured reserve). With a backup who ranges from passable to brilliant in Brian Boucher, the Flyers decided to place Leighton on waivers thanks to their perilous salary cap situation.

Tim Panaccio reports that the big goalie cleared waivers today while Sam Carchidi writes that he was seen “appearing upset” as he packed his bags, being that he is primed to join the the Adirondack Phantoms once again. Many thought that the New York Islanders would decide to pick him up on waivers after Rick DiPietro left Monday’s game against the Calgary Flames with an injury, but that did not come to pass.

Travis Hughes of the Flyers blog Broadstreet Hockey fills in the details regarding Leighton’s future (and lack thereof with Philadelphia).

Leighton will still get paid his full salary, but he’s removed from the Flyers’ capped payroll. With Erik Gustafsson back on the Phantoms, and assuming Leighton is officially assigned before 5 p.m. today, the Flyers are actually just barely under the salary cap by $4,262 per day, according to our Geoff Detweiler.

Leighton cannot be called up to the Flyers without being subject to re-entry waivers, which in a nutshell means he likely won’t ever be a Flyer again (until three seasons from now when the claim him on waivers again…). The only way, it seems, for him to make it back to the Flyers would be during training camp next year when waivers do not apply. That is, if he’s not traded or claimed in re-entry or retired because the Phantoms make him miserable before then.

Predators snatch Marek Svatos from Blues via waivers

Image (1) mareksvatos-thumb-250x302-19692-thumb-250x302-19693.jpg for post 5959

When we passed along word that the St. Louis Blues signed Marek Svatos yesterday, we made sure to note that he would probably need to clear waivers before he became a member of that team. That disclaimer proved to to be a wise asterisk to note, as the Nashville Predators snatched Svatos from St. Louis before he could clear waivers, according to Darren Pang.

As noted in that previous post, Svatos isn’t an elite scorer but should give the Predators (just like he would have given the Blues) a nice asset for the power play and other goal scoring situations. It looks like his deal will be worth $800K for one season, according to Travis Hughes of SB Nation.

Again, this isn’t likely to be a move that will shift the balance of power in the Western Conference, but it’s a solid low-risk medium-reward kind of deal. The fact that the Predators also enjoyed the thrill of sticking it to their Central Division rivals probably didn’t hurt, either.