Tag: Chris Terreri

Adam Oates

Adam Oates’ five greatest accomplishments

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In anticipation of Monday’s Hockey Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, PHT is taking an in-depth look at each of the four main entrants. 

While he never won a Stanley Cup, Adam Oates has been at the heart of many great moments in hockey history. Being an Oates fan since I was a kid I can’t list them all off, but here’s five of them that will have you wondering what took the Hall of Fame voters so long to put him in.

1. He helped Brett Hull score 86 goals

Rewind it back to 1990-91 during Oates’ short time with the St. Louis Blues and look at what he did while lined up with the “Golden Brett.” Oates finished the year with 90 assists and 115 points while Hull poured in a career-high 86 goals. During the two and a half seasons he played for the Blues, Hull had the three greatest goal scoring seasons of his career (72, 86, 70). Coincidence?

2. He was the set-up man for three 50 in 50 seasons

Twice in Hull’s career he scored 50 in 50 (or less). In his 86-goal season, he scored 50 in 49 with Oates’ help. The following year, Hull potted 50 in 50 on the nose and did it before Oates was shipped off to Boston.

With the Bruins, Oates would help Cam Neely reach legendary status scoring 50 in 49 games in the 93-94 season. Of course, Neely did it while playing on bad knees that kept him out of action for half the year.

50 in 50 (or less) has only been done officially eight times and unofficially four other times (Neely’s being one of them). Factoring in on three of them is astounding.

3. In case you didn’t guess, he’s an all-time great assist man

Think of the all-time greatest set-up men in NHL history. Obviously there’s Wayne Gretzky. Even Mark Messier is up there too. So what about Oates? He’s sixth all-time in assists.

For a guy who was never really regarded as a superstar talent, Oates just kept quietly doing his thing until he finished with 1,079 helpers. That’s more than Mario Lemieux, Steve Yzerman, Gordie Howe, Marcel Dionne, Joe Sakic, or Doug Gilmour — all fellow Hall of Famers.

Not only that, he was in one of the most awkward commercials in NHL history.

4. He was once traded for a future Hall of Famer

Oates started his career with the Detroit Red Wings playing alongside Steve Yzerman. How did he not stay there and wind up winning his elusive Stanley Cup? Because he, along with current Senators coach Paul MacLean, were traded to the Blues for Bernie Federko and Tony McKegney.

Federko played one season with the Red Wings before retiring and was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2002. Meanwhile McKegney was traded to Quebec after 31 games. How about a do-over Detroit?

5. The championship he did win

While he never won a Stanley Cup (he appeared in two finals: 1998 with Washington, 2003 with Anaheim), he did win an NCAA national championship with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY in 1985. That year, he merely scored 31 goals and added 60 assists (91 points) in the Engineers’ 38 games. His assist and points marks are still school records today.

Don’t worry, Martin Brodeur has plenty of hate for the Rangers

Martin Brodeur

The Devils don’t know if they’re facing the Capitals or Rangers in the Eastern Conference finals yet, which means story lines have yet to be drawn up. One thing to keep in mind though, if you’re worried about Martin Brodeur having focus against their rivals from New York, think again.

Tom Gulitti of Fire & Ice spoke with Brodeur about the Rangers and finds out that his dislike of the team dates back to the 1992 playoffs when he played backup to current Devils goalie coach Chris Terreri.

“I was part of the whole seven games,” Brodeur said. “I was on the bench. I was in the locker room. I got to hate the Rangers early on, got the taste of it. And all (this) year with what happened and all the new faces, we’ve got a little bit of that feeling.”

If a potential Rangers-Devils series happens this year and takes on any of the feelings of that 1992 series, we”ll get to see Brodeur throw down with a Blueshirts forward the way he did with Joey Kocur back in the day. It’s almost too bad Sean Avery isn’t around anymore, that’s a match-up made in Hollywood just with more fat jokes.

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: New Jersey Devils

Ilya Kovalchuk

The Devils haven’t always been the entertaining team on the ice, but they’ve been winners. That sort of attitude applies to their sweaters over the years, as they haven’t always been entertaining or controversial but they’ve always been great. From guys like Pat Verbeek and Chris Terreri to Scott Stevens, Scott Niedermayer, Martin Brodeur, and Ilya Kovalchuk they’ve had the names but the same look on the ice. But what about those sweaters?

Best: Well, there’s not a lot of room for error here when examining the Devils’ sweaters of the past. They’ve had two different types of sweaters and, depending on your preference in colors that determines which way things fall here. Given that I’m just north of 30 years-old and spent my formative years watching hockey in the 80s and early 90s… I’m a big fan of the “Christmas” color jerseys the team adopted from the moment they arrived in New Jersey in 1982 that lasted until black replaced green in 1992.

Worst: The Devils haven’t done anything egregious at all in their history and I’m not about to call anything they’ve done to be the “worst” of anything. Some of you might take issue with the old days wearing green and red, but those sweaters still looked nice. Switching to black, while predictable in the early 90’s, made a ton of sense considering they’re named the Devils. After all, what colors do you see devils wearing in artistic representations most often? Yup.

Old-timey favorite: The Devils weren’t always in New Jersey. They were born originally in Kansas City as the Scouts and moved to Denver to become the Rockies. Of those previous iterations, the Kansas City Scouts sweater from 1974 is iconic for its wild striping, funky colors, and logo that paid homage to a Kansas City landmark and history as a western outpost.

Assessment: The Devils are about as boring with their sweaters as they were back in the mid-90s under Jacques Lemaire and the neutral zone trap.  The difference here is that people reflect upon the Devils sweaters and its interlocking “NJ” with love and admiration. After all, it was featured prominently in the film “Clerks” and if you don’t love “Clerks” you’re either not a child of the 90s or Kevin Smith himself. The Devils have avoided the third jersey plague and they’ve even brought back the green and red jerseys once a year for St. Patrick’s Day. What’s not to appreciate about that?