Tag: Chris Osgood

Howard Osgood

Lockout puts crimp in Howard-Osgood bromance

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Several things have been lost during the lockout thus far — jobs, games and optimism, to name a few.

But how about friendship?

That’s the case in Detroit, where Wings goalie Jimmy Howard is lamenting the loss of his good buddy Chris Osgood.

Here’s more, from the Free Press:

Since he entered the NHL, Jimmy Howard has come to rely on Chris Osgood — as a mentor, a booster, and most of all, a friend.

The lockout that’s now in its 11th day dividing team personnel from players has left Howard unable to have contact with Osgood, who retired from the Wings a year ago and transitioned to goaltending development coach.

“It’s weird,” Howard said, laughing, of their new relationship. As for play dates between his young son, James Russell IV, and Osgood’s young son Max, “only our wives can get together.”

The two have known each other since the end of the last lockout. In 2005-06, a 21-year-old Howard made his debut for the Wings while Osgood battled it out with Manny Legace for the No. 1 gig.

Since then, other Detroit netminders have come and gone — Dominik Hasek, Joey MacDonald, Ty Conklin — but Howard and Osgood (Howgood? Osward?) have remained constants.

As such, Howard has a cache of drills and practice routines learned from Osgood and Detroit goalie coach Jim Bedard. That’s how he’s keeping sharp. He’s also fortunate to have the assistance of a potential new BFF — Todd Bertuzzi.

“I know what I have to do, and I’ve worked with Jimmy for long enough that I know a lot of his drills,” Howard said. “And Bert always participates in them before practice, so we’ll be able to get things going here once we get used to skating out here by ourselves.”

Mike Modano explains retirement: ‘It’s just time’


Earlier today, we shared Mike Modano’s announcement that he will hang up his skates after 21 seasons in the NHL. It’s not exactly shocking news that the 41-year-old future Hall of Famer decided to finally end his career, but it underscores the conclusion of a great era for USA Hockey as well.

Modano’s explanation was pretty reasonable. He said that it was “just time,” explaining that he hadn’t gotten any calls from NHL teams after free agency began during July 1.

Modano figured that was it, until he received a potential training camp tryout from the Vancouver Canucks. He decided to turn the offer down for fitness reasons, although it’s acceptable to think that he said “No” because it seems wrong for the all-time leader in points and goals among American-born players to go to training camp to merely fight for a deal.

“I told him I had to pass because I hadn’t touched a weight or unzipped my bag since we lost in San Jose,” he said.

The final hockey memory of Modano might be his rough final season with the Detroit Red Wings, where he earned just 15 points in 40 games in an injury-ravaged 2010-11 campaign. He even found himself as a healthy scratch during most of the playoffs, but fellow Red Wings retiree Chris Osgood thought that Modano was about to turn the corner.

“He was on the verge of really producing for us before he got injured,” former Red Wings teammate Chris Osgood said. “By the time he was able to play, it was too late. But back in the 1990s, few guys could skate and shoot like him. I can still see him flying down the ice, cutting down the lane and snapping off a shot toward the high glove.”

In the big picture, it doesn’t really matter how his career ended. Modano made such a huge impact on the Dallas Stars franchise (where he spent 20 of his 21 seasons) and American hockey that few should remember him for his late-career swoon.

“Scores of kids grew up pretending to be Mike Modano, not only in our country, but across the world,” Dave Ogrean said. “That fact alone helps frame the enormous impact he’s had on the game. His accomplishments on the ice speak for themselves. He’s one of our greatest players ever.”


“He was invaluable in helping sell the game of hockey in Dallas,” [Stars GM and former teammate Joe] Nieuwendyk said. “Mike is the face of our franchise and I think it is safe to say that no one else will wear No. 9 for the Dallas Stars.”

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman congratulated Modano on an outstanding career.

“We thank Mike for giving National Hockey League fans 21 years of thrills with his speed, his skill, his craftsmanship and his class,” Bettman said. “Mike also excelled on the international stage, representing the NHL and USA Hockey with great distinction.”

As Modano contemplates his next step, many in the hockey world will debate where exactly he ranks among the greatest U.S.-born players to ever lace up skates. If you gauge a player based on more than just stats and skills (such as his ability to grow the sport), an argument can be made that he might be the most important American player of all-time.

Either way, Modano’s impact won’t be forgotten anytime soon, even if his playing days are finally over.

Chris Osgood adapting to a new life as a goalie coach

Chris Osgood

When Chris Osgood called it a career this summer, it set up this season to be the first since the early 90s that he wouldn’t be preparing for a NHL season in goal. With his career over and the debate over whether he’s a Hall Of Fame-caliber goalie set to rage on for the next few years, Osgood is staying in Detroit but changing things up job-wise.

Instead of being the guy leading the way in goal, he’ll be the one teaching the young goalies coming through the system how to do things better. Osgood is jumping on board with the Wings staff as an assistant goalie coach focusing on helping out Wings prospect goalies in the system. For him, this year’s training camp is going to have a decidedly different feel to it.

Gregg Krupa of The Detroit News caught up with Osgood to see how he’s adjusting to his new role and new life as a teacher on the ice.

“I’m excited about it,” he said, flashing a familiar smile.

“It’ll be fun. I’m going to enjoy it. I’m looking forward to going up to Traverse City with the young guys.”

Freshly back from his annual summer stay at his home in British Columbia, Osgood spent much of the Red Wings’ voluntary skate Wednesday talking with the Wings’ longtime goaltending coach, Jim Bedard, whom Osgood is to assist.

“I’m not doing too much, now,” Osgood said. “I’m just learning from Jimmy; just kind of riding shotgun, listening to what he says and learning how to run the drills myself, so when I’m in Toledo and Grand Rapids, I can do that.”

For Osgood, the one thing he’ll be best at teaching younger goalies is how important it is to be mentally tough. Through Osgood’s entire career he was a guy who went from being a starter to being swapped out in favor or someone else with a bigger name only to keep proving himself worthy again and again. In the mid-90s with Detroit he traded spots with Mike Vernon. In the 2000s he left Detroit because the Wings were moving on with guys like Dominik Hasek, Curtis Joseph, and even Manny Legace.

It took until 2008 for Osgood to get his redemption in Detroit when he supplanted Hasek in goal during the playoffs and led the Wings to the Stanley Cup. You don’t go through a career like that without having the thickest of skin, a trait that defined Osgood by the time he retired. If Osgood can help the Red Wings’ youth to have that same brand of mental toughness, even the worst of games will only motivate them to improve and help keep them focused on moving forward.