Tag: Chris Clark

Olaf Kolzig

Kolzig looking forward to new role with Capitals


After spending the 2013-14 season as the team’s goaltending coach, Olaf Kolzig is looking forward to his new role in Washington as the club’s professional development coach.

Kolzig, 44, asked for a reassignment during the offseason in order to be closer to his his three kids.

The former Capitals first-round pick (19th overall in 1989) is hoping to use his new role as a stepping stone to bigger front office responsibilities.

“I’ve always thought about trying to get into the management side of things,” Kolzig told the Monumental Network. “This is a great way to start. You’re developing players, you’re watching them and nurturing them. And at some point, when my kids get older and I feel that I can spend more time up here, then maybe that’s something that I’d like to pursue. But for now, I was very appreciative that the organization accepted my new role and the proposal that I sent to them. I’m really looking forward to it. It’s great because it does allow me to get back and be with the kids, and at the same time have that chance to get my name on the [Stanley] Cup.”

Kolzig, who spent parts of 16 seasons in Washington, ranks 22nd among goaltender in games played (706) and 26th in wins (303). He’s trying to learn from former teammates Craig Billington and Chris Clark, who have also transitioned from their playing days to front office jobs with NHL clubs.

“When Biller first went to Colorado, he introduced this proposal to them, and I think it’s a vital thing in the game today, developing these kids,” said Kolzig, who will also be a fill-in goaltending coach. “And not just from how they are on the ice and their skills set but their transition from junior hockey or college or European hockey to all of a sudden pro hockey.”

Kolzig knows what that development process is like first hand. After being drafted in ’89, he didn’t become a full-time NHLer until the 1996-97 season. His development took him through a number of stops in both the American Hockey League and East Coast Hockey League.

“It takes some time to develop a routine and to develop something that works for you,” says Kolzig. “It’s a huge transition. I don’t think people understand how big it is. What you try to do is to keep them busy so they’re not constantly thinking about the game. You need a break. There is a lot of pressure in pro hockey. If you’re in a bit of a slump, your tendency is just to go home and dwell on it and at the end of the day, it will probably snowball and you’ll put yourself in more of a funk. It’s better to leave whatever it is at the rink and then go home and do whatever else it is. Maybe you have a dog, or a girlfriend, or you’re learning a language or an instrument. Just something to be productive.

“I know we all like to live and breathe hockey, but at the same time you also need something away from the rink. When I was younger, I played golf. It was a different time back when I came in; you had a lot of veterans and you did a lot of team bonding stuff away from the rink. And that’s not the case nearly as much now. If I can get the guys to be a lot more comfortable and keep the mountains low and the valleys high, and just keep them at a consistent level, then I think I’ve done my job.”

Kolzig begins his new role with the club this weekend.

PHT’s Morning Skate: Dan Carcillo used to be an altar boy

Left Wing Dan Carcillo
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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

You know what they say about those kids who went to parochial school, they either turn out to be hockey bloggers (like yours truly) or hockey tough guys like Dan Carcillo. (CSNChicago.com)

Speaking of Carcillo, he and Patrick Kane are having a mustache battle for Movember. Methinks this won’t bode well for baby face Kane. Call us when the mullet battle goes down. (ESPN Chicago)

Teemu Selanne tore his team a new one after their OT loss to Washington. When Teemu roars, you’d better listen. (OC Register)

Dominik Hasek is 46 years-old and he still wants to keep playing hockey. Who does he think he is, Chris Chelios? (NHL.com)

Mike Fisher has been cleared to play for Nashville after getting rung up by Francois Beauchemin. Resume your duties Nashville paparazzi. (Tennessean)

The Ilya Kovalchuk at right wing experiment lasted less than one game. Maybe they could’ve told him it was like left wing, just in reverse? (Fire & Ice)

Corey Perry is getting his number retired… By his junior team the London Knights. (Ducks)

Nathan Horton says he doesn’t feel like himself. He also says it’s not concussion-related. Hmm… (CSNNE.com)

Evander Kane is playing great in Winnipeg and silencing the critics. Wait, there are critics in Winnipeg? (Winnipeg Sun)

Chris Clark is getting a tryout with the AHL Bruins after missing out with Boston in training camp. (CSNNE.com)

Andy Sutton says it’ll take more than a suspension to change how he plays the game. He would know, he’s an expert in suspensions by now. (Edmonton Journal)

Peter Regin is finally seeing a finish line in his injury recover for Ottawa. Sadly, it’s about six weeks away. (Senators Extra)

College hockey: If you thought the battle over the North Dakota Fighting Sioux nickname was over, you were sorely mistaken and haven’t been paying attention to this saga. (USCHO)

Finally, Lauri Korpikoski proves that you don’t need balance at all to be able to score a goal. (NHL)

Is Chris Clark the guy to fill Mark Recchi’s veteran role in Boston?

Chris Clark

When Mark Recchi retired this summer after helping the Boston Bruins win the Stanley Cup, it ended a stellar career for the 43 year-old veteran. Recchi’s departure also left the Bruins lacking a bit on their forward lines. While Recchi’s knack for the net and veteran savvy won’t be around in Boston this year, there’s another older player who’s looking to impress coach Claude Julien and GM Peter Chiarelli in camp this year.

Former Capitals captain Chris Clark is joining the Bruins in camp on a tryout basis looking to find a way onto the Boston roster this season. Clark is coming off a season in Columbus that saw him hit the ice for just 53 games scoring five goals and adding 10 assists. Since being traded from Washington two years ago, Clark’s career has quieted down a bit in Columbus scoring just eight goals in a season and a half in Ohio.

Clark was never really the goal scoring, point production kind of player as he’s a prototypical grinder, but that sort of player in Boston can become a folk hero if they play well enough. CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty caught up with Clark as he tunes up for training camp and finds out that he knows just what his role will be if he can crack Boston’s lineup.

“I’m always excited for camp, but I’d rather be two weeks into camp,” said Clark. “I know who everybody is from playing against them, but I’m looking forward to getting to know them on a personal level. I had a couple of camp offers, but nothing great.

“I talked to Peter [Chiarelli] and they were looking for somebody like me. Whether it becomes me or not remains to be seen. It’s up to me, but we’ll see what happens. The off-the-ice stuff was definitely important [for a potential role with the Bruins], but the on-ice stuff is pretty important too.”

You’d have to think that “somebody like him” would mean a guy who can play a solid 12-13 minutes a game in a defensive forward role. Expecting Clark to come in and do the things that Recchi would do is asking him to go outside his realm of abilities. If the Bruins are in need of a third or fourth line grinder, however, Clark is the guy that could fill that role admirably. After a miserable go of it in Columbus and looking to win a Stanley Cup, going to Boston could be the exact opportunity he’s been waiting for.