Tag: Cam Janssen

NEWARK, NJ - NOVEMBER 15: Damien Brunner #12 of the New Jersey Devils skates in an NHL hockey game against the Los Angeles Kings at Prudential Center on November 15, 2013 in Newark, New Jersey. (Photo by Paul Bereswill/Getty Images)

Brunner: I’m ready to return


The New Jersey Devils are one of five teams that are no more than a point behind in the race for the second Wild Card spot in the Eastern Conference.

These next few games could break that logjam for better or worse as they face tough St. Louis Blues tonight and follow it up with key contests against the Washington Capitals and New York Rangers.

At least they should be some extra help as Damien Brunner (knee) was very upbeat after Monday’s practice.

“I feel 100 percent and I’m ready to go,” Brunner declared, according to the Bergen Record.

He conceded that whether or not he’s good to return isn’t his call, but Devils coach Pete DeBoer said there was a “good chance” that he’d play tonight. On top of that, the Devils placed Cam Janssen on waivers in a move that was likely designed to clear a spot for Brunner.

Brunner hasn’t lived up to expectations this season, but he turned a corner right before he was hurt. The Devils will just have to hope that missing a month hasn’t permanently killed his comeback.

PHT’s top 13 of ’13: Anti-fighting movement gains momentum


Hockey is a sport that fosters passionate debate, but few topics have as entrenched supporters and dissenters as much as fighting.

To some, fighting is at the core of the game and an integral part of the NHL; others see it as barbaric, outdated, and, in the age of increasing awareness of concussions, downright irresponsible.

This year saw an increase in the debate and new momentum for those that oppose sparring matches. With head injuries becoming an increasing concern, the fear that fights might lead to concussions is a key argument against it. One of the better recent examples of that is George Parros, who has dealt with two fight-related concussions this season.

The first one you could write off as an unfortunate accident, but the second is harder to dismiss:

Even before Parros’ second head injury of 2013, Tampa Bay Lightning GM Steve Yzerman wondered why the league was handing out suspensions for head hits courtesy of checks, but fighting was still penalized by a mere five-minute penalty.

“We’re stuck in the middle and need to decide what kind of sport do we want to be,” Yzerman argued. “Either anything goes and we accept the consequences, or take the next step and eliminate fighting.”

Yzerman was joined by Pittsburgh Penguins GM Ray Shero, Carolina Hurricanes GM Jim Rutherford, and legendary coach Scotty Bowman in his call for change.

At the same time, there’s clearly a fair amount of fan support for fighting, at least among PHT readers that overwhelmingly voted it belongs in the NHL. The players have continually, and overwhelmingly, supported its role in the game, too. Ditto for general managers like Calgary’s Brian Burke.

Why the support for fighting? Depends who you ask. Some advocates support dropping the gloves as a form of entertainment and an expression of the ferocity of the sport; others argue it actually prevents injuries by allowing players to police themselves. Still others feel fights can stop a bad situation from getting worse.

The latter is certainly the belief of New Jersey Devils enforcer Cam Janssen, who suggested that Boston’s Shawn Thornton’s recent attack on Penguins defenseman Brooks Orpik wouldn’t have happened if Orpik had agreed to fight after delivering a hard hit to forward Loui Eriksson.

Other players, like Detroit’s Daniel Alfredsson, feel that’s an old-school view that shouldn’t be followed any more. Instead, Alfredsson thinks that hits should be ruled on by the referees and left at that.

Finally, it’s worth noting that not all fights are created equal. When Philadelphia goaltender Ray Emery skated the length of the ice to force Capitals netminder Braden Holtby to fight him, there was widespread condemnation.

NHL disciplinarian Brendan Shanahan “hated it” and commissioner Gary Bettman also voiced his displeasure.

But while this year’s incidents may have helped fuel the debate over fighting, it doesn’t sound like any major rule changes are on the near horizon for the NHL, which has repeatedly maintained “there is not an appetite to change the rules with respect to fighting.”

Alfredsson: Players shouldn’t need to fight after dishing big hits

Daniel Alfredsson

New Jersey Devils enforcer Cam Janssen recently suggested that the Shawn Thornton-Brooks Orpik incident could have been avoided had Orpik brawled with Thornton after his big hit on Loui Eriksson. The Boston Bruins star forward suffered his second concussion of the season as a result of the blow.

With the Detroit Red Wings getting ready to play the Pittsburgh Penguins tonight and the decision on Thornton looming after his in-person hearing yesterday, 41-year-old forward Daniel Alfredsson was asked if players should fight after delivering a big hit.

“Not at all,” he told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review’s Josh Yohe. “That’s the old school. Let ref decide if it was illegal.”

Orpik didn’t receive a penalty on the play, but because of Thornton’s actions, Orpik is also dealing with a concussion. To be clear, Janssen doesn’t think that what Thornton did was “correct,” even if he feels that a fight would have prevented things from escalating further.

The NHL is expected to announce Thornton’s punishment around 4:00 p.m. ET, according to Sportsnet’s John Shannon.

Janssen: Orpik should’ve fought Thornton, then ‘everything would have quieted down’

Cam Janssen

Devils tough guy Cam Janssen says the Shawn Thornton-Brooks Orpik incident could’ve been avoided had Orpik engaged Thornton when prompted to fight.

Here’s the excerpt, from a lengthy Q&A with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

“Thornton calls you out, he’s calling you out in front of everybody, and you don’t fight, then it’s not over. Then we’ve got to get our justice. We’ve got to get our justice and then something happens and boom that happens. All of a sudden he’s hurt. If Orpik would, once in a while … Once in a while … you don’t have to trade punches, you don’t have to stand in there and go toe to toe.

“If Orpik just would have dropped his gloves and grabbed on – he’s a strong guy – grabbed on, held off Thornton, maybe took a couple [punches], and threw him down or whatever the case it, then it’s over. Then it’s over. Then it’s done. You fought. You stuck up for yourself. If you don’t do that, somebody else on Orpik’s team, somebody on Pittsburgh has to do it for you because of what you did.

“If Orpik would have just stepped up – all he had to do was grab and hold on, hold on to him – then everything would have quieted down. You stuck up for yourself. You knocked [Bruins forward Loui Eriksson] out. You stuck up for yourself. All of sudden it’s over. You fought. Boom.”

Janssen, one of the NHL’s most active fighters over the last seven seasons, said Thornton had to “step up and do something” in the wake of Eriksson getting hit — but specified that the way Thornton went about it (slew footing Orpik, then punching him while on the ice) was wrong.

“Not saying what he did was correct,” Janssen explained. “[Thornton] should have spun him around, challenged him again, see what happened and go from there.

“He shouldn’t have done what he did. Stuff happens in the heat of the moment.”

Related: Orpik (concussion) skates; Thornton hearing set for today

Video: Brandon Prust drops huge uppercut on Cam Janssen


Montreal Canadiens enforcer Brandon Prust took exception to a hit New Jersey Devils tough guy Cam Janssen delivered on Wednesday, then the hockey world took exception to the uppercut Prust landed on Janssen.

Habs Eyes on the Prize passes along slow motion video of the blow:

Goodness. The fact that Janssen stayed on his feet is Example 2,050 of why hockey players are tougher than the rest of us.

Full video of the fight will be posted if it becomes available, but if not, that clip should mesmerize on its own. (In fact, let’s keep that slow-mo blow, either way … OK?)

Janssen and Prust are no strangers; this was the fifth fight the two engaged according to Hockey Fights, which makes sense as Prust also played for the New York Rangers.