Tag: BWI

Dustin Byfuglien

Report: Dustin Byfuglien will face drunken boating charges

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Dustin Byfuglien’s run-in with the law while boating on Lake Minnetonka in Minnesota nearly two weeks ago will apparently result in further legal problems for the Winnipeg Jets defenseman.

In case you’d forgotten, Byfuglien was arrested for suspicion of BWI (boating while intoxicated) after refusing to take a blood or urine test last week. According to a report out of the Winnipeg Sun, Byfuglien will face charges surrounding his arrest.

“A complaint has been approved but it’s not been filed yet to our knowledge,” said Steve Tallen, a Lake Minnetonka Conservation District attorney.

As for the kind of trouble Byfuglien could face if he’s convicted, the Minnesota boating laws show that a BWI conviction means he could face a $1,000 fine, possible jail time, or lose his boating privileges for 90 days (PDF Link here). If he’s convicted, he could also run into problems being able to go to and from Canada and the United States. Given that he’s from Roseau, Minnesota and will be playing in Winnipeg, Manitoba that development would be a worst-case scenario for both him and the Jets.

We suspect that things won’t go that far in his case, but then again, you never know how things will play out in court either. Let’s hope Byfuglien has learned his lesson.

Dustin Byfuglien waits to find out if he’ll be charged for BWI, might have visa troubles in Canada

Jets Byfuglien Arrest Hockey
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For many in the hockey world, Dustin Byfuglien’s legal troubles were shocking in more ways than one. Joe couldn’t help but poke fun at Byfuglien’s stunning weight of 286 lbs., calling him “The Jumbo Jet.” (May I also submit a far less creative nickname of “really Big Byuglien”?) Others might be surprised that there’s such thing as a boating while intoxicated (BWI) charge.

All snarkiness aside, the situation might provide some legitimate problems beyond possibly embarrassing Byfuglien into consulting Gary Roberts for dieting tips. The most recent reports indicate that it’s still unclear if Byuglien will actually be charged with a BWI; Labor Day will complicate matters and reportedly delay that decision until at least Tuesday, according to the Winnipeg Free Press.

There’s also the chance that the U.S.-born hybrid defenseman might have trouble crossing the Canadian border (and no, that’s not a joke about his weight) in the future. The Winnipeg Free Press details that while he isn’t currently under any type of bail restriction, that situation could get a little bit murky.

Lucy Perillo, who operates Canada Border Crossing Services in Winnipeg — a company that works with offenders on both sides of the border to assist in travel — said it’s possible Byfuglien could be refused entry into Canada based simply on pending criminal charges such as third-degree boating while intoxicated and the refusal of a blood or urine test. He would also be obligated to disclose the fact he’d been arrested and fingerprinted.

“He’s technically not inadmissible into Canada, because he hasn’t been found guilty of anything. But they do have the right to refuse. Typically, though, Canadian officials at the Emerson border are very fair, as are those at the Winnipeg airport,” Perillo told The Winnipeg Free Press.

Perillo said Byfuglien’s life would become much more complicated if he was ultimately convicted. In Minnesota, he could face up to 90 days in jail, a $1,000 fine and a yearlong driving suspension. He would then have to apply in writing to the Canadian government for a temporary resident permit to enter the country. If granted, the order would expire after one year.

Byfuglien would have to apply for five consecutive years before he could attempt to obtain a lifetime pass, said Perillo.

It doesn’t necessarily stop there, either, because Perillo said that there’s “never a guarantee” that Byfuglien would get a lifetime pass. The report also reveals that Manitoba upholds any driver’s license suspensions that happen in the United States, so if Byfuglien is found guilty, he’d have to find someone to drive him to games (and hopefully not to buffets).

Depending upon how the results shake out, NHL might also determine that he’ll need to seek help with the NHLPA’s Substance Abuse and Behavioural Health Program. The Winnipeg Jets have said that they’re “still gathering information at this time” so we’ll have to wait and see if Byfuglien faces any consequences beyond the courtroom.

All joking aside, this is a serious headache for Byfuglien and potentially his team as well. Deadspin’s Barry Petchesky opines that the incident shouldn’t be a laughing matter in light of recent player deaths. The hope is that Byfuglien learns from this embarrassing incident and becomes much more careful, whether he deals with some legal headaches or just gets a slap on the wrist.

Dustin Byfuglien’s arrest for BWI not most shocking part of arrest report

Dustin Byfuglien

Players running afoul of the law is never a good thing to hear about. That’s why when Minnesota radio contributor Darren Wolfson tweeted details about how Winnipeg Jets defenseman Dustin Byfuglien was arrested in Minnesota’s Hennepin County last night it came as a shock.

Byfuglien was brought in after being booked on a charge of boating while intoxicated and, according to Wolfson, refused to take a sobriety test. Doing that is a quick way to getting booked and that’s just what happened to Byfuglien as he was arrested and released later in the night.

Even more stunning to read was Wolfson’s report on what Byfuglien weighed in at when he was brought in. Let’s just say that if Byfuglien plays at the weight he checked into Hennepin County Sheriff’s with, opposing forwards should remember to get the number of the Mack truck that hit them.


At 6’5″ having Byfuglien weighing in at 286 is remarkable if that’s indeed the case. Considering that hockey players are always a bit leaner than your regular athlete makes this revelation all the more stunning. It’s not as if Byfuglien has ever been a small guy, just ask Roberto Luongo about that when it came to seeing around him in the playoffs back in 2010.

You wonder if perhaps the weight he was listed at as playing was one of those cases where things are downplayed in the game program to keep up appearances. Of course, bending the numbers by 40 pounds would be a pretty gross downplaying of the truth. Here’s to hoping the folks in Winnipeg don’t mind their newest semi-local star coming into camp being known as the “Jumbo Jet.”

I’ll see myself out.

(Thanks to Hockey Wilderness for the tip)