Tag: Bruins-Canucks

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

Video: Star Cam and Net Cam footage from Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals

(Check out an in-depth recap of the Boston Bruins’ 4-0 win against the Vancouver Canucks in Game 7 here. You can read about Tim Thomas’ Conn Smythe Trophy victory, Mark Recchi’s retirement announcement and the Bruins’ celebration of the Cup win in the corresponding posts.)

Believe it or not, the Canucks actually brought a reasonable effort to the table in tonight’s defeat. They fired 37 shots at Thomas and created a nice amount of scoring chances.

Unfortunately for Vancouver fans (who haven’t exactly taken the loss very well, sadly), the Bruins’ stars came through while theirs couldn’t get it done. Over time, people will probably forget the near-scores by the Canucks and focus on the brilliant run by Thomas and a fantastic game by Brad Marchand and Patrice Bergeron.

Check out NBC’s Star Cam footage from Game 7.

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Enjoy some of the best work from the goalies in this Net Cam montage.

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Vancouver Canucks fans riot after Game 7 loss; Mayor calls it ‘extremely disappointing’

Stanley Cup Fans

Unfortunately, the parallels between today’s Vancouver Canucks and the 1994 edition extend beyond a Game 7 defeat all the way toward a violent reaction.

Vancouver authorities were optimistic that Canucks fans wouldn’t riot whether the team won or lost in Game 7 tonight, but it doesn’t look like they got their wish. While it’s unclear how severe the rioting was at this time, it seems like some Canucks fans reacted to their team’s 4-0 loss in a way that continues a sad pattern from 1994. Seventeen years later, they expressed their anger regarding tonight’s defeat by rioting.

The Associated Press captured a scene in which “parked cars were set on fire, others were tipped over and people threw beer bottles at giant television screens.” (You can view some “raw video” of the scene in this YouTube clip. CTV also has a dispiriting feed of the violence.)

Again, it’s unclear at this time how bad the damage was and how many people were injured. The New York Times archives reveals that 200 people were injured during the 1994 riots, but hopefully that situation was more severe than tonight’s ugly incidents. Hopefully no one was seriously hurt during this extremely negative reaction, but it’s a sad moment whenever such a thing happens.

We’ll keep an eye out for updates regarding these regrettable riot-like acts with the hope that we’ve already seen the worst. Perhaps some day fans can find a better way to release their (likely alcohol-fueled) emotions, whether their teams win or lose.

Update: Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson released this statement.

“It is extremely disappointing to see the situation in downtown Vancouver turn violent after tonight’s Stanley Cup game. Vancouver is a world-class city and it is embarrassing and shameful to see the type of violence and disorder we’ve seen tonight.

The vast majority of people who were in the downtown tonight were there to enjoy the game in a peaceful and respectful manner. It is unfortunate that a small number of people intent on criminal activity have turned pockets of the downtown into areas involving destruction of property and confrontations with police.

The Vancouver Police and Vancouver Fire Department are doing an exceptional job under challenging circumstances to maintain control of the situation and keep people safe, and emergency crews are working tirelessly to assist those who were injured.

The priority is public safety and ensuring that people can leave the downtown area to make their way home without further incident. Transit is operating at full capacity.

I urge the public to remain calm and to stay away from central downtown in order to assist police in restoring safety to our streets.”

Mark Recchi announces his retirement after getting his wish: one last Stanley Cup win

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

There aren’t many professional athletes who can look back at the final game of their playing careers with the same amount of positivity as Mark Recchi will. The Boston Bruins forward confirmed the expectations of many by announcing his retirement shortly after his team won the Stanley Cup in Game 7.

He didn’t win the Cup as some lucky bystander, either; he scored seven points in the Stanley Cup finals series and 14 points in 25 playoff games overall. He earned an assist and an impressive +3 rating in Game 7 while skating alongside Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand.

Every player has his regrets, but Recchi enjoyed an outstanding 22-year career in the NHL. He won three Stanley Cups: one in his first playoff run in 1991 with the Pittsburgh Penguins, one after being traded to the Carolina Hurricanes in 2006 and this triumph with Boston. Recchi will finish his distinguished career with 1,533 points in 1,652 regular season games and 147 points in 189 career playoff contests.

Are those the numbers of a Hall of Fame player? Almost 86 percent of PHT readers think so, according to this poll.

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Whether he makes the Hockey Hall of Fame or not (I would bet that he does), Recchi produced a fantastic career. That’s something he can reflect on in retirement, though. Tonight, he’s simply going to spend one more night doing what’s likely one of his favorite things: celebrating a big win with his teammates.