Tag: Bruins-Canucks


Your requisite Vancouver Canucks playoff injuries post


With the 2011 Stanley Cup finals – and therefore, the playoffs – over, it’s time to get answers/speculate some more on the injuries that hampered both teams. We’ll address the newly crowned champion Boston Bruins later on, but let’s get to the wounded warriors on the losing end first.

(Source: The Vancouver Province.)

First, let’s get to the players who discussed their injuries a bit more openly.

  • Alex Edler said he was playing with two broken fingers.
  • As many suspected, Christian Ehrhoff was dealing shoulder issues. He needed shots before games and probably lost quite a few mph from a blazing (but often wildly inaccurate) slapper. Ehrhoff told the Vancouver Province that he’ll probably need surgery.
  • Chris Higgins said his foot never felt “quite right” but didn’t go as far as to say that it was broken. He did imply that he might need surgery, though.

Now let’s get to two players who weren’t quite confirmed.

  • Ryan Kesler was one player who wouldn’t speak on the record about injuries, preferring that people avoid using his issues as a crutch to explain the Vancouver Canucks falling just a win short from their first-ever Stanley Cup win.
  • Dan Hamhuis was rumored to miss most of the finals with a torn groin muscle, but wasn’t around to confirm or deny the reports.

Kesler wasn’t willing to lean on the injuries excuse, but teammate Jeff Tambellini knew that something wasn’t quite right.

“I think every stride hurt him,” said Tambellini. “He never showed it. He never talked about it. We never heard about it all day and this guy is at true warrior. The fact he even came back is mind-blowing. To skate with the puck as much as he did. He took his game to a different level this year and should be rewarded by the rest of the league. Everybody appreciates what he brings and playing as hurt as he was outstanding.

“He put himself on a superstar level and it’s going to be great to watch the rest of his career.”


But that didn’t make it any easier. Tambellini walked into a dressing room Wednesday that looked more like a hospital ward.

“There were probably shooting six guys up today,” said Tambellini. “We dealt with a lot of adversity this year and to do that and come up one game short is a real credit to this group.”

Obviously, every team deals with some injuries, especially this late in the game. Still, stories like these show over and over again that hockey players fight through pain (and sometimes injuries) for a chance to win the Stanley Cup. The Canucks fell one game short of that goal, but they deserve credit for their efforts in defeat.

Game 7 of 2011 Stanley Cup finals ties best Game 7 overnight ratings on record

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

With the NBA finals far enough in the sporting world’s rear view mirror, the NHL gained the opportunity to be the center of attention in Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday. That powerful position – plus the undeniable drawing impact of a huge, historic hockey market like Boston and its surrounding areas – made for some impressive ratings for NBC and the NHL.

The Boston Bruins 4-0 win drew a 5.7 overnight rating and 10 share, which ties the overnight ratings earned by a SCF Game 7 since the 2003 Stanley Cup finals between the Anaheim (Mighty?) Ducks and the New Jersey Devils. That also represents a 14 percent increase from the most recent Game 7 in the Stanley Cup finals, which took place between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Detroit Red Wings in 2009.

Yup, that means Tim Thomas & Co. beat Sidney Crosby, Nicklas Lidstrom and a bevvy of other stars from that series just two years ago.

The game earned the second-best overnight rating for a Stanley Cup finals game in the last 36 years, behind only Game 6 in last year’s series between the Chicago Blackhawks and Philadelphia Flyers, which drew a 5.8 overnight rating and 10 share (one can only imagine the ratings that would have been generated for a Game 7 between those two teams). It was also the highest overnight rating for a Stanley Cup final game involving a Canadian team in 38 years.

The ratings were especially mind-blowing in Boston:

BOSTON SETS RECORDS: The Boston market earned a 43.4 rating and a 64 share, the best overnight on record for a hockey game in Boston (dating back to 1991) and the best overnight in the Boston market featuring a Boston team in any major sports championship since Super Bowl XLII (Patriots-Giants, 55.6 on 2/3/08).

Boston’s seven-game average for the Stanley Cup Final (five games on NBC, two games on VERSUS) was a 28.1/44, 12 percent higher than ABC’s seven-game Boston average for last year’s NBA Finals (25.0/40 for Boston-LA Lakers).

Here is a list of the six best Stanley Cup final Game 7 ratings since 1995:

T1. 6/15/11, Boston-Vancouver, 5.7/10 – Last Night’s Game
T1. 6/9/03, Anaheim-New Jersey, 5.7/9
3. 6/9/01, New Jersey-Colorado, 5.5/11
4. 6/7/04, Calgary-Tampa Bay, 5.3/8
5. 6/12/09, Pittsburgh-Detroit, 5.0/10
6. 6/19/06, Edmonton-Carolina, 4.1/7

Finally, here are the top 10 U.S. markets for the game:

1. Boston, 43.4/64
2. Providence, 25.9/38
3. Buffalo, 10.6/17
T4. Detroit, 8.7/14
T4. Hartford, 8.7/13
6. Pittsburgh, 7.6/12
7. Denver, 7.2/14
T8. Minneapolis, 6.7/12
T8. Las Vegas, 6.7/11
10. St. Louis, 6.2/10

Perhaps there might have been a “novelty factor” to the Bruins winning their first Stanley Cup in 39 years, but something tells me that the NHL wouldn’t be too offended if Boston makes another trip to the championship round. (You can vote on that possibility in this poll, by the way.)

Vancouver riot reactions: Thousands volunteer to clean up mess, Henrik Sedin voices disgust

APTOPIX Stanley Cup Vancouver Scene Hockey

While it still remains unclear how much precise damage and the exact number of people who were injured in some way during last night’s riots in Vancouver, the latest numbers indicate that 130 to 140 people were admitted to local hospitals. Many of those injuries were reportedly related to the tear gas and pepper spray used at the scenes, although three people were treated for stab wounds with one person in critical condition. There haven’t been any fatalities reported at this time, though.

Whatever the final, official numbers end up being, it’s a huge black eye for the city of Vancouver (even if the spin dictates that it was a relatively small piece of the populace). The city also rioted in 1994 following the team’s Game 7 loss to the New York Rangers, leaving about 200 people injured in that incident.

While this event probably cost the city millions in damage – not to mention terrible public relations that might impact their tourism? – there have been some moments that remind us that there are good people in that well-liked city. Lesley Ciarula Taylor of the Star reports that 11,300 people volunteered to help clean up the mess that looters made in the city, although it isn’t known if that many people actually followed up on the encouraging drive.

(The Facebook group is located here while the Twitter group is @VancouverClean.)

Taylor’s story provided some reactions by local athletes and celebrities.

“World: as you can imagine Vancouver is being embarrassed by a relative few,” wrote basketball star Steve Nash of Victoria, B.C., according to The Canadian Press.

“We’re a great city and have a lot of class. Our team is great and our championship will come. Soon.”

Also on Twitter, B.C. Premier Christy Clark begged rioters: “Let’s not make things worse,” she said. “Time to go home.”

Former B.C. premier and past Liberal MP Ujjal Dosanjh tweeted: “Shame! “Not the Vancouver I know.”

Musician Johnny Reid urged the vandals to “stop the madness.”

“Trying to figure out why a few idiots can leave an entire country with a black eye?”

Henrik Sedin also expressed his disappointment about the situation.

“It’s terrible,” Canucks captain Henrik Sedin said, shaking his head. “This city and province has a lot to be proud of, the team we have and the guys we have in here. It’s too bad.”

This ugly incident makes it tough to argue that the city has progressed much since 1994. If the team makes it to a big stage like this – a likely scenario since elite players, for the most part, remain in place – let’s hope that officials are more prepared and fans are less unruly. If that takes limiting alcohol sales and gatherings around big screens altogether, then so be it.