Tag: Brian Campbell

Boston Bruins v Florida Panthers

Panthers’ biggest question: Can the old guys hang on while the young guys get better?


The Florida Panthers are a bit of an odd team, in terms of their mix.

They have Jaromir Jagr, who at 43 is the oldest player in the NHL by a considerable margin. They also have a couple of 38-year-olds in Willie Mitchell and Shawn Thornton, plus a couple of 36-year-olds in Roberto Luongo and Brian Campbell.

Yet you can’t call the Panthers an old team. These aren’t the New Jersey Devils we’re talking about here.

Not with 19-year-old Aaron Ekblad, the league’s reigning rookie of the year, and 22-year-old Jonathan Huberdeau, who received the same honor in 2013.

Also, Nick Bjugstad, Aleksander Barkov, Brandon Pirri, Reilly Smith, Vincent Trocheck, Dmitry Kulikov, Erik Gudbranson, Alex Petrovic, and Dylan Olsen. All of them under 25 years of age.

Oh, and don’t forget Lawson Crouse, the 18-year-old winger that could make the team. And Rocco Grimaldi, the 22-year-old forward who had 42 points 64 AHL games last season.

You get the point.

“We’ve got young players that are very capable of playing for us next year,” said GM Dale Tallon. “We don’t want to shut the door on that. We want those guys to get every opportunity to be on our team. I want to be the youngest team in the league and the best team in the league at the same time.”

The key next season will be for the old guys to hang on while the young guys get better. If that happens, the Panthers have a legitimate shot at making the playoffs, and even making some noise once they get there.

On the other hand, if key veterans like Jagr, Campbell and Luongo start showing their age and/or the youngsters experience too many growing pains, they could stumble.

Related: Roberto Luongo is under pressure

It’s Florida Panthers day at PHT

Roberto Luongo

Throughout the month of August, PHT will be dedicating a day to all 30 NHL clubs. Today’s team? The Florida Panthers.

For the third season in a row, the Florida Panthers fell short of the playoffs.

This time around, there were signs of moderate progress, as they finished 10th overall in the East with a 38-28-15 record (91 points). Final wild card team Pittsburgh finished seven points ahead of them, so there’s still work to do.

For especially jaded fans, this may sound like a broken record, yet the team’s extreme mix of potential and experience could make for intriguing results.

At one end, you have veteran star power with Jaromir Jagr and Roberto Luongo. They even have Brian Campbell for one more year, as his oft-cited $7.14 million cap hit will expire after 2015-16.

On the other end, a bountiful crop of young players earned from all these years of underwhelming play.

Aaron Ekblad won the 2015 Calder Trophy, while this year’s first-rounder Lawson Crouse may also make an immediate impact. Nick Bjugstad, Aleksander Barkov and Jonathan Huberdeau are all showing varying degrees of promise. Bjugstad’s the oldest of these young players, and he’s just 23.

Expectations should climb in Gerard Gallant’s second season as head coach, at least from those who are paying attention to a team that frequently slips under the radar.

Off-season recap

For the most part, the Panthers stayed idle in free agency, either letting veterans walk (Tomas Kopecky) or shoving them out the door (Brad Boyes). Perhaps re-signing Jagr constitutes their “big splash,” then?

They did make one eyebrow-raising move in adding Marc Savard’s contract in a deal that sent Jimmy Hayes to the Boston Bruins for Reilly Smith.

Florida seems content with letting its young players continue to grow alongside Jagr and Luongo.

Hudler edges out Datsyuk to win Lady Byng Trophy

2015 NHL Awards - Show

Jiri Hudler had a career season with 31 goals and 76 points in 78 contests. Along the way he only accumulated 14 penalty minutes and that helped him secure this year’s Lady Byng Trophy.

Among the top-20 scorers, he had the fewest PIM. Pavel Datsyuk, who has won this award four times, was a close second though with 648 votes to Hudler’s 700. There was a big drop off after that as Anze Kopitar just got 379 points. Hudler’s teammate, Sean Monahan, was the only player outside of the top three with at least 10 first-place votes (13).

Here are the voting results for the award, cutting off at the top 10:

Pts. (1st-2nd-3rd-4th-5th)
1. Jiri Hudler, CGY 700 (52-13-12-8-5)
2. Pavel Datsyuk, DET 648 (29-28-24-10-12)
3. Anze Kopitar, LAK 379 (11-18-20-13-4)
4. Daniel Sedin, VAN 267 (6-10-15-18-8)
5. Sean Monahan, CGY 232 (13-5-8-7-6)
6. Jason Pominville, MIN 205 (8-10-7-5-5)
7. Matt Moulson, BUF 150 (4-8-6-6-6)
8. Logan Couture, SJS 148 (3-6-2-16-18)
9. Ryan O’Reilly, COL 139 (2-8-7-6-10)
10. Patrick Kane, CHI 130 (3-4-8-8-8)

Here’s a list of the Lady Byng Trophy winners and second-place finishers since 1990:

Year Winner Runner-up

2015 Jiri Hudler, Cgy. Pavel Datsyuk, Det.
2014 Ryan O’Reilly, Col. Martin St. Louis, NYR
2013 Martin St. Louis, T.B. Patrick Kane, Chi.
2012 Brian Campbell, Fla. Jordan Eberle, Edm.
2011 Martin St. Louis, T.B. Nicklas Lidstrom, Det.
2010 Martin St. Louis, T.B. Brad Richards, Dal.
2009 Pavel Datsyuk, Det. Martin St. Louis, T.B.
2008 Pavel Datsyuk, Det. Martin St. Louis, T.B.
2007 Pavel Datsyuk, Det. Martin St. Louis, T.B.
2006 Pavel Datsyuk, Det. Brad Richards, T.B.
2004 Brad Richards, T.B. Daniel Alfredsson, Ott.
2003 Alex. Mogilny, Tor. Nicklas Lidstrom, Det.
2002 Ron Francis, Car. Joe Sakic, Col.
2001 Joe Sakic, Col. Nicklas Lidstrom, Det.
2000 Pavol Demitra, St.L Nicklas Lidstrom, Det.
1999 Wayne Gretzky, NYR Nicklas Lidstrom, Det.
1998 Ron Francis, Pit. Teemu Selanne, Ana.
1997 Paul Kariya, Ana. Teemu Selanne, Ana.
1996 Paul Kariya, Ana. Adam Oates, Bos.
1995 Ron Francis, Pit. Adam Oates, Bos.
1994 Wayne Gretzky, L.A. Adam Oates, Bos.
1993 Pierre Turgeon, NYI Adam Oates, Bos.
1992 Wayne Gretzky, L.A. Joe Sakic, Que.
1991 Wayne Gretzky, L.A. Brett Hull, St.L
1990 Brett Hull, St.L Wayne Gretzky, L.A.

With three Stanley Cups in six years, let the ‘dynasty’ debate begin


CHICAGO — It’s hard to believe now, but in 2007, when John McDonough was named president of the Blackhawks, the franchise had devolved into an afterthought in the Windy City.

Monday at the United Center, right before Jonathan Toews hoisted the Stanley Cup for the third time in the last six years, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman proclaimed to the fans, “I’d say you have a dynasty.”

Funny what assembling a core of four future Hall of Famers — Toews, Patrick Kane, Duncan Keith, and Marian Hossa — can do for a franchise’s fortunes.

Add secondary stars like Patrick Sharp, Brent Seabrook, and Niklas Hjalmarsson, get a good coach, a smart general manager, draft well, develop well, throw in a little luck, and the result is the first team worthy of the “dynasty” label in the salary-cap era.

“We’ve had to fight through some things, but it was worth every second of it,” said McDonough, speaking to reporters at center ice while the players and their young families celebrated around him.

source: Getty Images
Getty Images

“To see these guys mature into young adults, into grown men. Most of our guys when I started here were single. Now there’s babies all over the place.”

There will be those who question whether these Blackhawks are truly a dynasty. They haven’t won four straight Cups, like the Montreal Canadiens did from 1975-79, or the New York Islanders from 1980-83. They haven’t won five in seven years like the 1980s Oilers. Twice in the past six years Chicago has been eliminated in the first round.

When asked to weigh in on the dynasty debate, Kane replied, “I don’t know what that means. We’ve got three in six years. I know that’s pretty good.”

Similarly, general manager Stan Bowman deferred to others.

“I don’t think that’s really for me to say,” he said. “That’s really for other people to make those proclamations. All I know is that we’ve got an amazing group here, they’ve accomplished a lot together, and I’m really proud of the effort they’ve given year after year. It doesn’t always go your way, but they’ve accomplished quite a bit and we’re not finished.”

Bowman has another tough summer ahead. The Blackhawks won’t be back in their entirety next season. Some will be forced out due to the salary cap. That’s the “reality” of the situation, as Johnny Oduya put it. That reality is why the likes of Andrew Ladd, Dustin Byfuglien, Brian Campbell, Dave Bolland, Troy Brouwer, and Antti Niemi are playing elsewhere now.

“I think we’re going to enjoy this one for a bit,” said Bowman. “I’ve been thinking of that stuff for a long time. It’s not like it’s going to surprise me. We’ll make it work. We’ve got a plan in place. That’s really for another day. Right now we’re pretty thrilled with this whole scene in here.”

Fair enough.

A decade ago, the Blackhawks were playing games before a half-empty arena, an Original Six franchise ignored.

Monday, they kicked off one of the great sports celebrations in this city’s history.

They deserve to enjoy it.

So far, contract talk is all about term for Panthers, Huberdeau

Boston Bruins v Florida Panthers

Despite missing the playoffs, the Florida Panthers made some nice strides in 2014-15, and Jonathan Huberdeau was a big part of that climb. Now the two sides need to determine how his next contract will go.

At 22, Huberdeau is a restricted free agent. The leverage is largely on Florida’s side, even considering the fact that the young forward led the team in scoring by ten points with a career-high 54.

As the third pick of the 2011 NHL Draft, the belief is that Huberdeau will only get better from here. So what kind of price is right?

It turns out that the biggest issue is actually term, or at least that contract talks won’t really kick off until the two sides agree on that direction. Panthers GM Dale Tallon told the Miami Herald that the team is pretty open-minded when it comes to the length of a deal.

“The biggest thing is agreeing on terms, and once we figure that out we’ll start talking numbers,” Tallon said. “We’re looking at a bridge [contract] or something a little longer or a long-term contract. We’re open to anything. We’ll get something done that’s best for both of us.”

His RFA status limits his leverage, yet at just 22, there are quite a few ways things can go. (A longer deal might not be so bad since he’s so far from unrestricted status.)

Aside from Brian Campbell’s notorious (and soon to expire) $7.14 million cap hit, the Panthers don’t boast a ton of big-money contracts (unless you count Roberto Luongo’s deal, which is more about term). That situation can change as Florida’s young players mature, so Huberdeau’s next contract could very well be the benchmark for other important pieces of the Panthers’ future.