Tag: Brad Marchand

Screenshot from Sportsnet telecast

Not good: Brad Marchand suffered a concussion


Tough news for a Boston Bruins team dealing with a tough start: Brad Marchand has a concussion.

That’s the word from head coach Claude Julien, so it’s a sure thing.

Now, there was no word about how severe the issue may be, but it’s officially a concussion. It’s not the ideal scenario even if it’s a “minor concussion,” which feels like a contradictory idea in itself.

Here’s the Dale Weise hit from last night’s eventual 4-2 win by the Montreal Canadiens:

It’s not official like Marchand’s concussion, but there may be a bit of good news. Maybe.

Matt Irwin was placed on waivers Sunday, which may indicate that Zdeno Chara is ready to play again.

That would be a much-needed boost.

CSNNE.com has more.

Marchand rehabbing from offseason elbow surgery

Brad Marchand

Brad Marchand won’t be playing through an elbow injury in 2015-16 like he was last season, but before he can move past it he needs to complete his rehab process. Fortunately he’s upbeat about his recovery from his offseason surgery.

“It just started feeling better around the start of August,” Marchand told NHL.com. “So it was tough. I couldn’t do a whole lot of upper-body workouts for the first three months off. The last month has been good though. It’s come around and it’s feeling pretty good. But I’m still in the rehab process. So I’m trying to get my strength back up.”

He believes he’ll complete that process in time for the start of training camp.

This recovery has impacted his summer workout schedule as he was confined to a cast for six weeks and then spent an additional three or four weeks in a splint. Over that stretch he wasn’t able to engage in any weight training.

The trade off though is that, ideally, he’ll be pain free this season, which is in stark contrast to the 2014-15 campaign. There were times last season where he wasn’t able to hold a stick and the injury impacted his ability to shoot the puck. He was originally hurt during the 2014 playoffs so while there were days that were better than others, it meant that he spent the whole campaign playing injured.

Despite that, Marchand participated in 77 contests, chipping in 24 goals and 42 points. Excluding his 20-game stint in 2009-10 though, his 13.3 shooting percentage last season was the worst of his career.

Under Pressure: Claude Julien

Claude Julien

Unlike Peter Chiarelli, head coach Claude Julien got to keep his job after the Boston Bruins missed the playoffs in 2014-15.

But retaining Julien was no slam-dunk decision for new GM Don Sweeney. First, the two men had to make sure they were on the same page, philosophically speaking.

Turns out, both were.

“Don and I have had talks and have a very, very similar outlook on what’s needed and what we want to do,” Julien said, per the Boston Herald. “There was never an issue there at all. That’s why it’s worked out. We seemed to be seeing the same things. Personality-wise, we’ve known each other for a long time. It wasn’t as tough a process as far as evaluating as people might think, but it was more about the time that was needed for him to feel comfortable with everything.”

All that being said, it’s hard to imagine Julien keeping his job if the Bruins fall flat again. Ownership still has high expectations for this team; that much was made crystal clear last season.

The challenge for Julien is that Boston is a team in transition. While core players like Zdeno Chara, Patrice Bergeron, Tuukka Rask, and Brad Marchand remain, their success will depend greatly on the success of their youngsters.

“I came up coaching junior hockey, and I know how those young players are,” Julien said in June, per NESN. “I’ve had a lot of patience with those guys. Sometimes, you have to take a hard stance, but it doesn’t mean you’re not patient with them, and that you’re not trying to make those guys better.”

Though his reputation may say otherwise, Julien has had success with youth in the lineup. When the Bruins won the Stanley Cup in 2011, Marchard and Adam McQuaid were rookies, and Milan Lucic was younger than both of them.

The difference then, however, was that the youngsters were significantly outnumbered by players with experience.

As Julien was quick to point out, “there’s a lot of veteran players on that Chicago team, and that’s why they’ve been there three years in a row.”

Related: Julien ‘pretty impressed’ with Sweeney’s moves

Sweeney vows to return ‘aggressiveness’ to Bruins

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

Cam Neely spoke last month about the big, bad “identity” of the Boston Bruins, and how getting away from that identity had made them not as “tough to play against as we’d like to be.”

And so it was no surprise when new general manager Don Sweeney, flanked by Neely, spoke today about getting back to that identity, in hopes of returning to the playoffs and competing for a Stanley Cup.

“We’re not as far away as people may think,” Sweeney said. “We have to get back, a little bit, the aggressiveness that was lost in our group.”

Sweeney suggested that the Bruins, having won the Stanley Cup in 2011 and gone to the finals in 2013, had grown “stagnant” or overly “comfortable” with their mix.

Not anymore, he promised.

“There will be some changes going forward,” he said. “There will be personnel changes. There will be staff member changes.”

On that note, Sweeney did not commit to keeping head coach Claude Julien.

“I have some things that I want to sit down with Claude and go through in a very orderly fashion, as to where I think things need to change, and what direction we need to change as a group,” said Sweeney.

“So it’s just about lining up philosophical approaches that I believe in, that he believes in, and that we can move the group forward.”

Sweeney, the longtime Bruins defenseman who’s been in the front office since 2006, was asked about the importance of returning to the “style” that people have come to expect from the organization.

“I think it’s incredibly important,” he said. “It’s one thing to throw the words ‘culture’ and ‘identity’ around, it’s another to live it, breathe it, and teach it.”

Of course, it’s still another thing to assemble the players to be successful with that style.

Or any style, really.

Because the Bruins did not win the Stanley Cup in 2011 by aggression alone. To suggest they did would be to ignore the actual hockey-playing performances they received from the likes of Tim Thomas, Zdeno Chara, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron, Milan Lucic, Brad Marchand, Dennis Seidenberg, Johnny Boychuk, Nathan Horton, Mark Recchi, and the list goes on.

That team, big and bad as it was, had a lot more than toughness going for it. An elite goalie. An elite defenseman, still in his prime. An elite two-way center. A scoring center. Depth on defense. Four lines that all contributed. Energetic youngsters. Veteran leaders. And on top of all that, the Bruins stayed relatively healthy through 25 hard-fought playoff games.

The 2014-15 roster still had some of those things. But it did not have all of those things.

Conceded Sweeney: “I think it would’ve taken a lot of things to fall our way for us to be in a position to challenge this year.”

So…a lot of things on Sweeney’s plate.

That includes throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at tonight’s Boston Red Sox game.

Welcome to the spotlight.

Related: Bruins fire Chiarelli after missing playoffs

Rangers haven’t granted B’s permission to interview assistant GM Gorton

2014 NHL Stanley Cup Final - Practice Sessions

Expanding on earlier reports that Boston has reached out to Rangers assistant GM Jeff Gorton about it’s vacant gig, Blueshirts boss Glen Sather told the New York Post that he hasn’t permitted the B’s to interview his right-hand man.

“I haven’t given permission to anybody to speak to anyone and I won’t as long as we’re playing,” Sather explained. “And there’s a question whether I would, anyway, after it’s over.”

It’s understandable that Boston is interested in Gorton given his ties to the organization. He was the club’s assistant GM when it drafted the likes of Patrice Bergeron, David Krejci, Milan Lucic and Brad Marchand and, in 2006, briefly served as interim GM prior to Peter Chiarelli coming aboard.

According to ESPN, the Bruins have narrowed their GM search down to four candidates, though it’s unclear if Gorton is on that list. Other names tied to the gig include ex-Pens GM Ray Shero and current assistant GM Don Sweeney.

Per the Post, Gorton has one year remaining on his deal with New York and is widely expected to inherit the GM gig when Sather, who turns 72 this year, steps aside.