Tag: Bobby Clarke

Ron Hextall

Report: Flyers promote Ron Hextall as GM, Holmgren to president


The Philadelphia Flyers front office will have a new look to it very soon.

The Flyers have called a press conference at 11:30 a.m. ET to announce front office promotions. According to Tim Panaccio of CSNPhilly.com, the announcement will be to promote Paul Holmgren as the team president and Ron Hextall as the new general manager.

This news comes as a bit of a surprise as it was less than a week ago it was announced Holmgren was staying on as the GM. Instead now he’s moving on up and Hextall takes over. Perhaps the rash of GM openings around the league pressed the Flyers into action if they wanted to retain Hextall.

Hextall has been an assistant GM since 2006. After seven years with the Los Angeles Kings in that role, Hextall became Holmgren’s assistant GM with the Flyers in July 2013. He’s been preparing and ready for a job like this for some time now.

Holmgren has been the Flyers GM since 2006-07 when he took over for Bobby Clarke. He’s been in the Flyers organization since 1995-96 when he was the head of pro scouting and then moved up to assistant GM in 1997-98.

Video: Ilya Bryzgalov’s Winter Classic mask is the most Philly thing ever

Bryzgalov Winter Classic mask

Ilya Bryzgalov has already endeared himself to all of us thanks to 24/7, but now he’s giving it up for the fans in Philly with the mask he’ll be wearing for the 2012 Winter Classic.

Instead of opting for Rocky Balboa and Benjamin Franklin, he’s running with Philly sports icons Reggie White, Mike Schmidt, “Dr. J” Julius Erving, Bobby Clarke, and Joe Frazier. If this mask was any more Philly it’d have a crazed Danny DeVito eating a sandwich from Geno’s/Pat’s/Tony Luke’s while playing flip cup. This is pretty cool just the same.

PHT Morning Skate: Turris excited to go to Canadian market

Phoenix Coyotes v Detroit Red Wings
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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Kyle Turris talks about his excitement to play with the Ottawa Senators—and a Canadian market. He better produce quickly or all of that added exposure could turn into a heavy burden. (Senators Official)

Now that the Senators hope they’ve landed their No. 2 center with Turris, the Derick Brassard trade rumors to Ottawa should be a thing of the past. (QMI Agency)

Pat Hickey returns! This time, he’s telling us that Jacques Martin was just a scapegoat for the troubles in Montreal. (Montreal Gazette)

Unfortunately, it looks like the hockey world has yet another racial controversy on its hands. This time, we look to the OHL for the alleged insults. (Buzzing the Net)

Bobby Clarke has plenty of ideas when it comes to the concussions around the NHL. You know, because he was so anti-violence when he was a player. S/T to Kukla’s Korner. (PhillyBurbs.com)

Speaking of Flyers captains of the past, are Eric Lindros and the Flyers organization ready to bury the hatchet once and for all? (Philadelphia Inquirer)

Adrian Dater doesn’t care about scoring. He says the NHL game is better than ever. (Denver Post)

Here’s what Evgeni Malkin had to say after his hat trick against the Sabres: “My first shot, I scored. Second shot, I score again. It’s a lucky day for me.” Yeah, it’s all luck Geno. (Post-Gazette)

The GM is getting booed at Nationwide Arena and beat-writers are calling the playoffs a “pipe dream.” Needless to say, things could be better in Columbus (Puck-Rakers)

Bad news for the San Jose Sharks. Martin Havlat had some issues trying to make a line change on Saturday night and was seen leaving the arena with a cane. Here’s why: (CSN Bay Area)

Clarke willing to shake Lindros’ hand at Winter Classic


Bobby Clarke versus Eric Lindros is one of the most infamous and heated feuds in hockey history. But could it be coming to an end this December?

Clarke seems to think so.

Prior to the Flyers hosting the Rangers at the 2012 Bridgestone Winter Classic on Jan. 2, there’ll be an alumni game on Dec. 31 in which both Clarke and Lindros will play as teammates. The two haven’t spoken since Clarke acrimoniously sent Lindros to the Rangers back in 2001, but the former Philly GM seems ready to let bygones be bygones.

“As far as I’m concerned, (the feud) is over,” Clarke told the Burlington County Times. “I couldn’t be bothered one way or the other. He helped the Flyers, why shouldn’t he be with the Flyers? I’m not mad at him. I’ll shake hands with him. It’s not going to affect my life one way or the other if he doesn’t (reciprocate).”

Yep, sounds like he’s totally over it. No hard feelings there.

To be fair, Clarke v. Lindros was one of the ugliest, nastiest personal feuds in NHL history. The fact that was played out in the media only made it worse, and probably played a large role in why it still resonates today.

If you’re unfamiliar with the gory details, here’s a fairly concise recap from CBC:

Eric Lindros won an NHL MVP award in 1995 and led the Philadelphia Flyers to the Stanley Cup final in 1997, but he quicky fell out of favour with Flyers GM Bob Clarke, who publicly questioned the towering forward’s toughness as he missed time with concussion problems.

The feud boiled over in 1999 when Lindros suffered a collapsed lung during a game in Nashville. Flyers trainers failed to diagnose the injury and were ordered to put Lindros on a plane back to Philadelphia. Lindros got to hospital only at the insistence of his hotel roommate, Keith Jones, leading Lindros’ father to write the team a letter saying his son would be dead had he listened to the Flyers’ medical staff.

After being stripped of his captaincy the following year, Lindros refused to re-sign with Philadelphia in the summer of 2000 and demanded that Clarke trade his rights to Toronto. The GM refused and Lindros sat out the following season, during which a defiant Clarke said, “I don’t give a s— if [Lindros] plays another game.” Eventually, though, Clarke gave in and shipped Lindros to the New York Rangers.

Clarke has maintained it was Lindros and his family that had a problem with the Flyers, not the other way around.

“I haven’t spoken to him,’’ Clarke said. “When he first went to the Rangers, he wouldn’t speak to me. But no big deal. The Lindros family caused the Flyers a lot of grief. (Eric) was bitter at us. They were the ones who were resentful, not me.’’

For the record, Lindros has stated he’s ready to bury the hatchet.

“I can’t wait to get back there, see them and play for the fans again. Looks to be a great event,” The Big E said in an email to ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun. “It was very nice of Bob to say some of the things he has said, and I too look forward to catching up with him.”

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: Philadelphia Flyers

Bobby Clarke

You don’t mess with the best, and the Flyers have one of the best and most iconic logos in all of sports. Putting that on a sweater that looks good is something the Flyers have excelled at throughout their history. Considering that orange is their primary color, they deserve some kind of award for helping make that look good.

Best: The Flyers are tough for fans to love outside of Philly. Their style of play rubs people the wrong way and then they go on and wear orange and black to look like a Halloween gang. There is one look that remains iconic for them: Their road orange sweater from 1972-1977. I specify those because that was the height of the “Broad Street Bullies” days and when they came to your arena, there were no names on the back of the sweater, just numbers. If you had a bone to pick with any of the players, you had to know what number they were rolling with. Chances are good you knew what that was too.

Worst: Oddly enough, orange is at the heart of their worst sweater. For a spell in the 1990s and early 2000s the Flyers ditched the orange sweater opting for a black sweater that worked as their third jersey from 1997-2001 and then as their road sweater from 2001-2007. From 2002-2007, their orange alternate was added as some fans were upset about losing an orange sweater to their repertoire. What they got instead was a jersey that made it look as if the iconic Flyers logo and numbers were raised up in a almost 3-D look. When you go from a look that was one of the best in the NHL already to something that deviated just enough to be off-putting, you did something wrong. The Flyers realized the error of their ways and ditched it in favor of sticking with black alone for a few more seasons.

Sweaters and pants don’t mix: While the Flyers look through the 80s is one that became more than well known to fans all over, there was the Cooperalls era. If you don’t know what those are, you’re better off, but the Flyers (and Whalers) for a time wore pants instead of breezers on the ice. Think of them as hockey playing warmup pants. Not good. The Flyers wore Cooperalls for two seasons before ditching them and let’s just say there’s a reason why you don’t see NHL fans wear warmup pants to games and it’s got nothing to do with not being a member of the Sopranos.

Assessment: The Flyers current set of sweaters are perfect. The off-colored name plate on the back takes a minute to get used to, but with the garish orange and white sweater at home and the white with orange trim sweater on the road, the Flyers give off the air of being like the Broad Street Bullies but with a modern twist, something Chris Pronger would be more than proud of.