Tag: Bob Probert


“Goon” is cinema’s love letter to hockey enforcers


Hockey movies fall into two categories generally, they either go down as iconic (“Slap Shot” “Miracle”) or they go down in flames (“The Love Guru”). You can chalk up “Goon” as being an iconic film of its own.

One of the stars of the movie is Liev Schreiber, who plays the movie’s antagonist Ross “The Boss” Rhea, says it’s hard to do a hockey movie the right way and to do something no one’s seen before.

“How do you do a hockey movie fresh? How do you add anything to the anthology of hockey movies? One thing that Jay [Baruchel] really defines this movie with is the heart. That’s the one thing people don’t often talk about when they talk about hockey,” says Schreiber.

“I think it’s also something that defines hockey players. There’s a very strict code, especially among enforcers, of how you treat each other and you leave it all on the ice. Respect.”

Schreiber’s character Rhea plays the foil to Seann William Scott’s Doug Glatt and while you might be able to say that Rhea is the villain, that’s not the way Schreiber sees it.

source:  “I, personally, would disagree highly in saying Ross is a villain,” Schreiber says with a laugh.

“Guys like Probert, Georges Laraque, Donald Brashear, Dave Schultz… It was impactful to read about these guys’ lives and the misperception of them both as not hockey players and as goons. I think that’s part of what hurts for those guys.

“They give so much of their bodies and their lives to the game… I don’t know how many of them want to be remembered as purely enforcers or goons. I think a lot of those guys were great hockey players and that’s how they should be remembered.”

If it sounds like big talk for what’s a comedic movie, you’d be missing the point. “Goon” is a funny and violent film with enough bad language to make a sailor proud, but what’s hockey without all that?

“Goon” is a movie made by hockey fans (Director Michael Dowse and writer/co-star Jay Baruchel) with a metric ton of heart and it shows in how it plays out. Passing on watching this one would be a mistake.

“Goon” is currently available on Video On Demand and will hit theaters on March 30.

Family has “no plans” to donate Gordie Howe’s brain for concussion research

2012 NHL All-Star Game - NHL Fan Fair

The Canadian Press caused quite a stir when they supposedly made too-big a story out of Gordie Howe’s “mild cognitive impairment,” indicating that Mr. Hockey is fighting dementia.

With all that discussion about Howe’s cognitive functions, perhaps it only makes sense that some are asking if his family will donate the legend’s brain to concussion researchers once he dies – much like Bob Probert and other deceased players’ loved ones opted to do. Marty Howe told The Globe & Mail’s David Shoalts that the family hasn’t had that discussion, but his “opinion is it probably wouldn’t happen.”

Marty Howe didn’t really expand on that, but it’s ultimately the family’s choice. Interestingly enough, Howe did say that he believes concussions have contributed to his father’s condition – whatever you want to call it – so perhaps that stance might change with time.

Report: Derek Boogaard dealt with issues related to Alzheimer’s disease

Derek Boogaard

A sad and stunning New York Times report reveals that studies of Derek Boogaard’s brain provided evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. CTE is described as “a degenerative brain ailment related to Alzheimer’s disease that is caused by repeated blows to the head.”

One of the report’s most disturbing findings was that the disease was more pronounced in Boogaard (who died at age 28 and played in parts of six NHL seasons) than Bob Probert (who died at age 45 and played in parts of 16 NHL seasons). Dr. Ann McKee – one of the leading researchers – had this to say after studying Boogaard’s brain.

“To see this amount? That’s a ‘wow’ moment,” McKee said. “This is all going bad.”

It’s tough to argue with that point.