Tag: bloggers

Jay Feaster

Jay Feaster made a “blogger in the basement in his underwear” crack


Kudos to Calgary Flames GM Jay Feaster for staying hip with the times. Responding to the latest round of Jarome Iginla trade rumors, Feaster busted out a fresh new take on people that write web logs, commonly known as ‘bloggers.’

“One of the questions I have is, where do these things start?” Feaster asked. “Are they legitimate sources or is it a blogger in the basement in his underwear that says, ‘This is the rumour du jour’ and you guys feel the need to track it down?”

Feaster then broke into his routine about airline food and how rap music “sounds more like crap music.”

In addition to these comedic stylings, Feaster appeared confused as to the origin of all the Iginla trade rumors.

For a reply, I shall quote the Internet.


Iginla rumors are out there, man. Newspaper. TV. Radio. Internet. Telegraph. They’ve been discussed on every imaginable medium for the past two years — and now they’re everywhere. I’m pretty sure I heard an Iginla trade reference on last night’s episode of The Office, one of the many fine sitcoms on NBC’s award-winning Thursday night lineup.

Look, I get Feaster might’ve been pissed about the latest rumor (that a deal to Montreal was imminent). But I fail to see why this would spark more pointed questioning than Iginla to Los Angeles or Iginla to Dallas, both of which got a ton of play. Maybe Feaster’s just tired of answering the rumors. Maybe he’s upset about losing Mark Giordano. Maybe he’s choked his team is dead last in the Northwest Division and 13th in the West. I dunno.

Whatever the case, he shouldn’t blame the Internet. The Internet is good. It gave us Lolcats.

The NHL Network’s offseason programming: What’s your solution?


It’s no secret that the NHL Network’s offseason programming is weak at best. Aside from about an hour of various reruns each weekday afternoon, the network is stocked with wall-to-wall rebroadcasts of the 2011 Stanley Cup playoffs. For diehard Boston Bruins fans, there are probably about 23 games that will be interesting. But for the rest of NHL fans that saw their favorite team make the playoffs, the rebroadcasts just re-open wounds that have only started to heal. And the 14 teams that didn’t make the playoffs at all? Chances are those markets are clamoring for replays of their rivals vying for Lord Stanley’s Cup.

Bottom line: the rebroadcasts are stale.

Jeremy K. Gover wrote an excellent article outlining a few suggestions for the NHL Network and their executives to help breathe life into TV schedule. For anyone who is even remotely interested, it’s definitely worthwhile to read Gover’s article in its entirety; he has more than a few ideas and strategies towards implementing the vision. One idea he has is to have something like a “Director’s Cut” you may see on a DVD or Blu-Ray for the rebroadcasts aired in the offseason. It’s a great way to help liven up any replays the network chooses to run:

“Take Game 5 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Quarterfinal between the Blackhawks and Nashville Predators for example. Instead of just showing the moment when Martin Erat centers the puck instead of tying it up to preserve the one goal lead in the dying seconds of regulation, why not put a picture-in-picture box with Head Coach Barry Trotz sharing his post-game comments? Heck, why not the post-game comments from Erat himself? Who wouldn’t want to hear what those guys thought just moments after that monumental collapse happened?”

For those who need a reminder, here’s a refresher. Predators fans: watch at your own risk.

Another idea Gover presents is incorporating local reporters, columnists, and bloggers into the mix. Bringing in the locals would help take a look at a lot of the games that we’re already familiar with from a different perspective.

“Bloggers are the wave of the future. And newspapers are struggling. And both are looking for publicity (a/k/a free advertising). Why not bring them together and ask accredited media members from each team to do an on-camera commentary of the games they covered? How amazing would it be to watch the final moments of Game 4 of the Detroit Red Wings sweep of the Phoenix Coyotes while Carl Putnam of the Coyotes blog Five for Howling talks about what it was like being in that arena thinking ‘this could be the last time I watch a hockey game in Arizona?’ Whether you think Glendale deserves a hockey team of not, that’s just great TV right there.”

While all of Gover’s ideas have potential, this is where he strikes gold. Pulling in beat writers and bloggers that follow the team for 82 games every season would bring new life to old games. Assuming there’s positive feedback –let’s face it, more voices and perspectives are good for a network filling 24 hours of programming everyday – this is something that could spill into the regular season. If there’s a story about the Wild, then get Michael Russo’s take from the Star Tribune in Minnesota. If the Ducks make news, find out where the team was coming from with an interview with Eric Stephens from the OC Register. Mix in bloggers who have their finger on the collective pulse of their team’s fanbase. It would help give fans a more complete picture of any story making news throughout the season.

What do the readers think? Do you have ideas how the NHL Network could improve their offseason programming? Fans all over North America surely have ideas—we’d love to hear what you have in the comments.

Predators roundtable: Which one of Shea Weber, Ryan Suter and Pekka Rinne is most expendable?

St. Louis Blues v Nashville Predators

As we discussed earlier, the Predators are struggling to re-sign Shea Weber. Elliotte Friedman also points out that the team might have a hard time retaining the “Big 3” of Weber, Ryan Suter and Pekka Rinne, a subject many people tackled already. It’s no guarantee that the Predators will need to part ways with one of those players (nor is it a guarantee that they will retain any of them), but in the spirit of discussion, we thought we’d ask four of our favorite Predators bloggers a simple yet challenging question:

If you had to let one of Weber, Suter or Rinne go, which one would it be?

Here are their answers.

Buddy Oakes from Preds on the Glass:

I think Friedman’s numbers are a bit high for Suter and Rinne and I’m still thinking that Weber will come in about $7 million since he has told me specifically that he wants to leave money for others to keep the team together.

It’s probably an extreme minority view, but I would let Weber go if I had a choice. He would be the most marketable for a trade and would result in the greatest return. Suter is a better pure defenseman and would have an offensive upside if not paired with Weber. We have seen that Suter plays better without Weber than Weber does without Suter.

Also, the Preds have a good stockpile of young D-men to filter into the system. In spite of having other young goalies, Rinne should have several more years as one of the league’s best and is the true MVP of the team.

Amanda DiPaolo from Inside Smashville:

I fall in the camp of doing whatever it takes, including dumping salary, to keep Rinne, Suter and Weber, but I’d let go of Suter if one was going to leave.

While Suter is a great defenseman, Weber is the face of the franchise and better all around. People like to say that Weber is so good because he has a Suter playing with him – you need the stay at home d-man to allow for the power d-man like Weber to play his game – but it’s a role Blum could play, making Suter more replaceable.

Keeping Weber is also important to the franchise from an outside perspective since the Predators have a reputation for developing solid players and then losing them to free agency. Rinne has continued to improve every season in net. I’m just not ready to hand over the reins to Lindback (or anyone else for that matter).

Dirk Hoag, managing editor of On The Forecheck:

If forced to let one of the Big 3 go, my choice would easily be Pekka Rinne. As beloved as he is here in Nashville, he has a shorter history of elite performance than Weber or Suter, and when you look at the evolution of the goaltending market over the last few years, tying up something like $6 million annually seems like a poor long-term decision.

Besides, the real MVP of the Preds is goaltending coach Mitch Korn; the team has enjoyed superior play in net pretty much every season despite rotating through a number of players after Tomas Vokoun left in 2007. Whether it’s through the maturation of Anders Lindback, or the budget-friendly acquisition of a proven veteran, it would appear that if you need to make a financially-driven decision that least affects the overall quality of the team, Pekka has to go.

Jeremy K. Gover, managing editor of Section 303.

Let’s make one thing perfectly clear: Pekka Rinne is an all-world, elite goaltender (and those don’t just grow on trees). We know this not because he was runner-up for the Vezina, not because he should’ve won the Calder over Steve Mason in 2009 and not because he took fourth in the Hart voting either. We know this because he’s been giving the offensively-challenged Predators a chance to win every single game for the past three years. So Rinne’s out.

Shea Weber is the team captain. He’s the leader on and off the ice. He may not be the best quote in the locker room but he’s the closest thing the Preds have to a face of the league. So he’s out.

That leaves Ryan Suter. As much as he’s the first lieutenant in Weber’s army, he is the most expendable of the three. Nashville has other defensemen in the system who could eventually fill his role. So, while it would hurt (a lot!), the lesser of three evils is Suter.


So that’s two votes for Suter and one vote for Weber and Rinne. Personally, I’d lean toward replacing Rinne since the team has such a strong track record when it comes to generating quality goalies (and supporting them with great defense). As you can see from this study, it wouldn’t be an easy choice either way.