bargain contracts

Washington Capitals v Florida Panthers

The NHL’s best bargain contracts: Southeast Division

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The hockey world tends to focus on the most regrettable contracts rather than the best ones because let’s face it: it’s more enjoyable to make fun of Brian Campbell‘s deal than to linger on Dustin Brown‘s bargain contract. That being said, clever GMs deserve credit for either finding the right timing to sign a player, judging their value better than most or simply fostering a climate in which a player will take a pay cut. This series of posts will take a look at every team to see which (if any) players deserve to be called bargains.

Notes: entry-level deals don’t count because they have built-in maximum levels. “Loophole” contracts will be considered, but they won’t receive as much consideration because of their inherent salary cap dishonesty. Bought out players will be considered for their current cap hits. I also think $6 million is a reasonable – if arbitrary – cutoff point for a true bargain player.

Carolina Hurricanes – The Canes could have made the playoffs last year but got smeared by the Lightning in that deciding game.

Jussi Jokinen ($3M) – Jokinen was once a glorified shootout genius, but he’s been a valuable contributor for Carolina lately. His new contract seems like a solid deal for the Canes.

Alexei Ponikarovsky ($1.5M) – I’m not very high on Ponikarovsky, to be honest. That being said, he’s a four-time 20+ goal scorer entering an attacking system that could play to his strengths. It’s a low-risk, medium-reward deal.

source: Getty ImagesFlorida Panthers – Their hearts were in the right place, but the Panthers gave out funny money to a lot of unproven players this off-season.

Stephen Weiss ($3.1M) – Naturally, the best deal – and maybe Florida’s best player – involves a guy who’s been there for a long time.

Mike Santorelli ($1.6M) – He scored 20 goals last season, so his contract could be nice. Of course, it all depends on how he fits in with the many new pieces, though.

Honorable mention: If Jose Theodore proves me wrong and ends up being an above average NHL starter, then the Panthers found one at a cheap rate.

Tampa Bay Lightning – The Bolts lost a couple of players who helped them during their playoff run, but kept many of the big ones, so it’s reasonable to expect another nice season.

Martin St. Louis ($5.63M) – While the Lightning’s fortunes have resembled a roller coaster ride since they won a Stanley Cup, St. Louis steadily puts together great work year after year. He also does it at a great price.

Steve Downie ($1.85M) – Sure, his penchant for bad hits makes him a polarizing figure, but few players as violent as Downie also have as much offensive upside.

Dominic Moore ($1.1M) – A nice defensive player with a touch of offensive ability, Moore brings enough to the table that his contract is a solid steal.

source: Getty ImagesWashington Capitals – Could this be the year for the Caps? Bruce Boudreau certainly hopes so.

Mike Knuble ($2M) – Knuble plays a responsible game and scores dirty goals in bunches; he just finished his eighth consecutive season with at least 20 tallies.

Karl Alzner ($1.3M) – Alzner took an absurdly cheap deal and ranks as one half of the team’s promising young shutdown line. What’s not to like?

Tomas Vokoun ($1.5M) – It’s embarrassing that only two GMs were reportedly in the running for one of the league’s most consistently statistically excellent goalies. The best part for the Capitals is that they have at least one other netminder who can carry the load if Vokoun doesn’t work out for whatever reason. Either way, Vokoun is easily the bargain of 2011 free agency.

Honorable mention: Nicklas Backstrom is getting paid too much to be a true bargain, but if he bounces back with Alex Ovechkin as expected, he’ll go back to being a great bang for the buck center.

source: APWinnipeg Jets – The remodeled Thrashers won’t spend a whole lot of money next season, so do they have some bargains on their roster?

Bryan Little ($2.38) – He probably won’t score 31 goals again, but hitting the 20-goal plateau isn’t out of the question.

Eric Fehr ($2.2M) – Health is a concern with the large winger, but he could be the next Andrew Ladd.

Tobias Enstrom ($3.75M) – Enstrom quietly produces a lot of points; he passed the 50-point mark in two straight seasons.

Ondrej Pavelec ($1.15M) – Pavelec bounced back in an impressive way after his scary fainting spell and then tapered off toward the end of the season. Still, he put up a .914 save percentage overall, which is pretty good for a starter getting paid such a small amount. This season might determine if he’s the goalie of the future for the Jets.

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Feel free to point out any glaring omissions or faulty inclusions. Again, remember: players on their entry-level deals don’t count, so that’s why you won’t see the Jeff Skinners of the world.

Click here for the Atlantic Division version.

Click here for the Central Division version.

Click here for the Northeast Division version.

Click here for the Northwest Division version.

Click here for the Pacific Division version.

The NHL’s best bargain contracts: Northwest Division

Corey Crawford

The hockey world tends to focus on the most regrettable contracts rather than the best ones because let’s face it: it’s more enjoyable to make fun of Brian Campbell‘s deal than to linger on Dustin Brown‘s bargain contract. That being said, clever GMs deserve credit for either finding the right timing to sign a player, judging their value better than most or simply fostering a climate in which a player will take a pay cut. This series of posts will take a look at every team to see which (if any) players deserve to be called bargains.

Notes: entry-level deals don’t count because they have built-in maximum levels. “Loophole” contracts will be considered, but they won’t receive as much consideration because of their inherent salary cap dishonesty. Bought out players will be considered for their current cap hits. I also think $6 million is a reasonable – if arbitrary – cutoff point for a true bargain player.

Calgary Flames – Jay Feaster has some work to do to clean up all the messes that Darryl Sutter left behind. So far … eh.

Scott Hannan ($1M) – It’s really convenient that the Flames signed Hannan yesterday, because he’s the only true bargain on the roster now that Alex Tanguay got paid. I’m not Hannan’s biggest fan, but that’s a nice price for a guy who can absorb tough minutes and dish out some punishment.

Honorable mention: Anton Babchuk – he generates a nice amount of points, but he’s not very strong in his own end.

source: Getty ImagesColorado Avalanche – After a Cinderella 2009-10 season, the Avs fell apart in an ugly manner in 2010-11. The Washington Capitals hope that happens again, so they can get a high-end draft pick from the much-criticized Semyon Varlamov trade.

David Jones ($2.5M) – The Avs don’t have a lot of steals that aren’t entry-level deals, but Jones scored 27 goals last season so he might qualify. He’ll need to prove that last season wasn’t a fluke to do so, though.

Erik Johnson ($2.6M) – He gains this rank mainly because of his pedigree (No. 1 pick of a 2006 draft that was strong at the top) and because he’s set to play a top role. It’s unclear if he will live up to either billing, though.

Edmonton Oilers – Are there any steals on a team whose greatest hopes probably lie in the development of their prospects?

Ales Hemsky ($4.1M) – Hemsky hasn’t been much of a bargain because he’s been injured too often to show off his considerable skills. If there’s ever been a time in which he might actually earn that title, it’s next season because he’s in a contract year. If he plays anywhere close to 82 games, he’s probably worth more than $4.1 million.

Eric Belanger ($1.75M) – A solid deal for a defensive-minded center who might help the Oilers clean up some of their spills. He’s not a miracle worker, though.

source: APMinnesota Wild – The Wild experienced some drastic changes during this off-season, so does their roster look a little better than it did during the last few bleak seasons?

Cal Clutterbuck ($1.4M) – Clutterbuck was worth the money for the mere comic relief of his last name and the fact that he’s basically a homing missile on skates. He’s become even more valuable offensively each year, though; in the last three seasons he went from 11 (2008-09) to 13 (09-10) to 19 goals. Only departed winger Martin Havlat had more goals (22) in 2010-11.

Kyle Brodziak ($1.1M) – He’s not a crazy value, but Brodziak crossed the 30+ point barrier in three of his last four seasons. That’s not bad at his price, although he might see fewer opportunities to score next season.

source: Getty ImagesVancouver Canucks – The team that fell one win short of the 2011 Stanley Cup hasn’t changed much, which means they will still enjoy some nice bargains.

Ryan Kesler ($5M) – The runaway Selke Trophy winner enjoyed a strong enough campaign that some thought he was the Canucks’ true MVP.

Alex Burrows ($2M) – With Zach Parise’s $3.1 million cap hit a thing of the past, Burrows is a serious contender for the NHL’s biggest bargain. He might not be the most popular guy on the ice, but his combination of grit and goal-scoring ability make him a major asset. Perhaps the most insane part is that his contract won’t expire until July 2013.

Alex Edler ($3.25M) – Edler scored at an outstanding .65 point per game rate last season, the only problem was that his 33 points came in just 51 games. If he could stay healthy in 11-12, he might not be underrated much longer.

Honorable mentions: One of the trends with many of the NHL’s best teams is that their best players are paid below market value. That’s true with the Sedin twins and Roberto Luongo (especially with the twins). Critique those three all you want, but most teams would gladly accept the trio for the approximate annual cap hit of $17.5 million.

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Feel free to point out any glaring omissions or faulty inclusions. Again, remember: players on their entry-level deals don’t count, so that’s why you won’t see the Taylor Halls of the world.

Click here for the Atlantic Division version.

Click here for the Central Division version.

Click here for the Northeast Division version.

The NHL’s best bargain contracts: Northeast Division

Vancouver Canucks v Boston Bruins - Game Three
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The hockey world tends to focus on the most regrettable contracts rather than the best ones because let’s face it: it’s more enjoyable to make fun of Brian Campbell‘s deal than to linger on Dustin Brown‘s bargain contract. That being said, clever GMs deserve credit for either finding the right timing to sign a player, judging their value better than most or simply fostering a climate in which a player will take a pay cut. This series of posts will take a look at every team to see which (if any) players deserve to be called bargains.

Notes: entry-level deals don’t count because they have built-in maximum levels. “Loophole” contracts will be considered, but they won’t receive as much consideration because of their inherent salary cap dishonesty. Bought out players will be considered for their current cap hits. I also think $6 million is a reasonable – if arbitrary – cutoff point for a true bargain player.

Boston Bruins – The defending Stanley Cup champions are, for the most part, quite nicely constructed.

David Krejci ($3.75M) – I keep beating on this drum, but not enough has been made about Krejci being the leading scorer of the 2011 playoffs. In fact, let me ask: did you know that he was the top scorer of the postseason? (Be honest.)

source: Getty ImagesRich Peverley ($1.33M) – He looked pretty fantastic in the playoffs and should score around 20 goals next season.

David Seidenberg ($3.25M) – “The Pain Sponge” seemed overpaid until the playoffs, when he rarely looked out of place alongside Zdeno Chara on Boston’s top pairing.

Tim Thomas ($5M) – I won’t call many – if any – other goalies in Thomas’ price range a steal, but he was the best goalie in the world last season and one could make a reasonable argument that he had the best season of any NHLer, period.

Tuukka Rask ($1.25M) – Then again, if Thomas falters, his backup carried the load in 2009-10. Rask is expensive for a backup but could also have some great trade value if Boston goes that route (I wouldn’t, though).

Honorable mention: Patrice Bergeron is really good, but $5 million actually seems about right for him.

Buffalo Sabres – Are there any reasonable contracts left after Pegulamania ran wild during the off-season?

Derek Roy ($4M) – If Roy is over his injuries, he’ll go back to what he was before: a fantastic bargain for a point-per-game player.

Honorable mentions: Christian Ehrhoff’s cap hit is actually pretty cheap while Robyn Regehr could be a nice value as a shutdown defenseman, too.

source: APMontreal Canadiens – Don’t forget, Montreal didn’t sign Scott Gomez to his ludicrous contract. They actually traded for it years later, which is actually way worse.

Josh Gorges ($2.5M) – Gorges has been a surprisingly effective defensive player since going from San Jose to Montreal.

Carey Price ($2.75M) – I must admit, I didn’t expect Price to actually back up all of the hype last season. He was impressive and has the motivation of a contract year next season, which makes me think that Montreal will get a lot of value out of his two-year deal. Things might get fishy if he gets a big raise afterward, though.

Honorable mention: Max Pacioretty had 24 points in 37 games, which is a promising pace for a player as cheap as he is. He might be a steal if he can bounce back from THE HIT.

Ottawa Senators – Could this oddball team actually have some bargain deals?

Bobby Butler ($1.05M) – He has the potential to be a respectable scorer for the Senators and he’s really cheap. Plus there weren’t a whole lot of other options beyond Nick Foligno and … yeah that’s about it.

Honorable mentions: Daniel Alfredsson could be a bargain if he’s healthy and has enough left in the tank. I really like Craig Anderson, but I’m not crazy about his contract.

source: APToronto Maple Leafs – It seems like Brian Burke is starting to resemble the old Burkie again – before he seemed like Glen Sather in Burke’s clothing.

Mikhail Grabovski ($2.9M) and Nikolai Kulemin ($2.35M) – I’m skeptical that the Grabovski-Kulemin-Clarke MacArthur line will match their 2010-11 outputs, but the Maple Leafs would get a lot of value out of Grabovski and Kulemin if they did.

James Reimer ($1.8M) – Speaking of skepticism about repeated success, I have some concern that Reimer might be a one-hit wonder. Still, that one-hit was quite the top-tapper; he managed an impressive .920 save percentage in 37 games, which is enough of a sample to at least make the Leafs’ hopes reasonable. If he maintains something close to that level, then Toronto has a huge bargain contract for three seasons.

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Feel free to point out any glaring omissions or faulty inclusions. Again, remember: players on their entry-level deals don’t count, so that’s why you won’t see the P.K. Subbans of the world.

Click here for the Atlantic Division version.

Click here for the Central Division version.

The NHL’s best bargain contracts: Central Division

Ryan Suter, Pekka Rinne

The hockey world tends to focus on the most regrettable contracts rather than the best ones because let’s face it: it’s more enjoyable to make fun of Brian Campbell‘s deal than to linger on Dustin Brown‘s bargain contract. That being said, clever GMs deserve credit for either finding the right timing to sign a player, judging their value better than most or simply fostering a climate in which a player will take a pay cut. This series of posts will take a look at every team to see which (if any) players deserve to be called bargains.

Notes: entry-level deals don’t count because they have built-in maximum levels. “Loophole” contracts will be considered, but they won’t receive as much consideration because of their inherent salary cap dishonesty. Bought out players will be considered for their current cap hits. I also think $6 million is a reasonable – if arbitrary – cutoff point for a true bargain player.

Chicago Blackhawks – Sure, they lost a lot of talent because of cap moves, but how are they looking after getting rid of Soupy and stashing Cristobal Huet in Europe?

Marian Hossa ($5.25M) – This deal would be even better if it wasn’t a cheater contract, but how many teams are jealous that Chicago signed him to this deal? 28 or 29?

Patrick Sharp ($3.9M) – His cap hit will jump to what might still be a a bargain level of $5.9 million after next season, but he remains at his highway source: Getty Imagesrobbery rate for one more season.

Andrew Brunette ($2M) – I get the feeling he’s going to be a nice fit in the Windy City.

Bryan Bickell ($541K) – Could be useful, but it’s all about his sheer cheapness.

Duncan Keith ($5.54M) – Something tells me that Don Meehan won’t mention Keith’s name during Shea Weber’s next contract discussions. This is another cheater deal, but can you blame the Blackhawks?

Sean O’Donnell ($800K) – The Blackhawks made a handful of low-risk, medium-reward signings during this off-season and O’Donnell is one of them.

Honorable mentions: Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane – two great players, but it just feels weird to call them full-on bargains at $6.3 million per year … so they’re honorable mentions.

Columbus Blue Jackets – They wildly overpaid in some areas this summer, but where do they stand on pure cap hits?

Jeff Carter ($5.27M) – I agree that he’s one-dimensional, but the guy can score goals. Lots of them. So paying him this much isn’t outrageous.

Honorable mentions: Sammy Pahlsson (because Earl Sleek has brainwashed me into thinking he’s a force) and Derick Brassard (he seems talented enough to take advantage of the team’s offensive improvements if he can stay healthy).

source: APDetroit Red Wings – This team is like a steady stream of steals, right?

Johan Franzen ($3.95M) – Franzen is extremely injury-prone, but a terrifying offensive force when healthy.

Daniel Cleary ($2.8M) – Is Cleary the most underrated forward in Detroit?

Tomas Holmstrom ($1.88M) – If the league kept better track of how many goals are scored because of his obstructive butt, his impact would receive its proper due. I was surprised that some other team didn’t at least try to drive up his price during his last free agent window.

Darren Helm ($912K) – He has some flaws, but his speed and versatility are an asset at this bargain basement price.

Niklas Kronwall ($3M) – Injuries have been a worry here and there, but his scary hits and strong offense make him a steal at this price.

Jimmy Howard ($2.25M) – Another enviable steal by the Red Wings; his stats might be hit-or-miss sometimes, but he’s proven himself to be at least the team’s short-term future in net.

source: APHonorable mentions: Pavel Datsyuk, Henrik Zetterberg and Nicklas Lidstrom – Again, I’m just trying to keep things reasonable by excluding guys above $6 million. Every team in the NHL would trip over their own feet to pay any one of these three their current salaries, so they absolutely deserve to be mentioned.

Nashville Predators – A salary cap storm is coming to Tennessee, but next season still includes some bargains.

Ryan Suter ($3.5M) – He doesn’t get half the publicity that Shea Weber receives, but he’s either equally important or just a few strides behind his hard-shooting partner in crime.

Pekka Rinne ($3.4M) – In his short time behind the wheel in Nashville, he’s been legitimately elite. Maybe he benefits from the defense in front of him, but he deserves credit for putting together a great run so far.

Honorable mentions: Sergei Kostitsyn and Patric Hornqvist – they aren’t perfect players, but the Predators need them to score on a level that far exceeds their paychecks.

source: APSt. Louis Blues – How many steals can this “sleeper team” produce?

Chris Stewart ($2.88M) – Stewart is a big, reliable goal scorer at a dirt cheap price. He could score even more regularly this season since it will be a contract year.

T.J. Oshie ($2.35M) – His current rate almost seems like a slap on the wrist for his lower moments last season. I expect a very nice year from Oshie in 2011-12.

Patrik Berglund ($2.25M) – Berglund is quietly becoming a consistent 20-goal scorer in the NHL.

Honorable mention: If David Perron is healthy, he could be another nice steal on a team that doesn’t have many bad contracts. It would be sad (but not surprising) if his concussion issues continue, though.

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Feel free to point out any glaring omissions or faulty inclusions. Again, remember: players on their entry-level deals don’t count, so that’s why you won’t see the Alex Pietrangelos of the world.

Click here for the Atlantic Division version.

The NHL’s best bargain contracts: Atlantic Division

Claude Giroux
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The hockey world tends to focus on the most regrettable contracts rather than the best ones because let’s face it: it’s more enjoyable to make fun of Brian Campbell’s deal than to linger on Dustin Brown’s bargain contract. That being said, clever GMs deserve credit for either finding the right timing to sign a player, judging their value better than most or simply fostering a climate in which a player will take a pay cut. This series of posts will take a look at every team to see which (if any) players deserve to be called bargains.

Notes: entry-level deals don’t count because they have built-in maximum levels. “Loophole” contracts will be considered, but they won’t receive as much consideration because of their inherent salary cap dishonesty. Bought out players will be considered for their current cap hits.

New Jersey Devils – Zach Parise’s previous cap hit ($3.1M) was a true stroke of genius, but their current roster lacks many smart contracts. There was a point in which Martin Brodeur’s $5.2 million cap hit was a minor bargain considering his prestige, but it’s been a while since he’s been worth anywhere near that much.

Travis Zajac ($3.88M) – Could put up bonkers numbers on the Devils’ top line.

source: Getty ImagesNew York Islanders – A young team with some nice steals and a few embarrassing albatrosses.

Matt Moulson ($3.13M) – Moulson’s deal is a borderline bargain, but he has two straight 30+ goal seasons to his credit. There’s a good chance he’ll maintain that pace, so that’s a solid value for the Isles.

Frans Nielsen ($525K) – Nielsen generated some dark horse buzz for the Selke Trophy, yet he’s basically a minimum wage player. His bargain deal will run out after next season, so it will be interesting to see how long he’ll be underpaid. He’s one of the league’s biggest steals right now, though.

Evgeni Nabokov ($570K) – I’ve gone on record of saying that the Isles would get the most out of him if they simply let him be their top goalie, but even if they only get a little bit of a return via the trade route, he’s still a steal. Sure, his contract is funky because it was only originally meant to cover a few months, but it still counts.

Rick DiPietro ($4.5M) – Just kidding.

Honorable mentions: Michael Grabner (we’ll see if he’s a one-hit wonder), Mark Streit (big steal if health permits) and Al Montoya ($600K would be cheap if he is their full-time starter).

source: Getty ImagesNew York Rangers – Glen Sather’s been embarrassing himself with far less regularity lately.

Ryan Callahan ($4.27M) and Brandon Dubinsky ($4.2M) – They’re not the bargains they once were, but could be well-worth the money if their scoring numbers match their intensity for the length of their new contracts.

Marc Staal ($3.98M) – Not a bad price at all considering his importance to the Rangers’ defense.

Honorable mentions: Sean Avery (could actually be worth the trouble if he lines up with Brad Richards and Marian Gaborik) and Brian Boyle (a nice bargain if his 21-goal year wasn’t a fluke).

Philadelphia Flyers – They basically got rid of some of their best bargains during the off-season, but do they still have a few steals on their roster?

Claude Giroux ($3.75M) – Even if Giroux might get exposed now that they’re counting on him a lot more than before, he’s still a big-time bargain at this price. The best part is that his outstanding value won’t run out until after the 2014-15 season.

Braydon Coburn ($3.2M) – Not a bad deal for a pretty talented (if easily forgotten) defenseman. The Flyers pay a lot for their defensive corps overall, though.

Honorable mention: Jakub Voracek (could be the next Ville Leino) and Wayne Simmonds (might not score much, but could play the role that Dan Carcillo was too much of a knucklehead to ever pull off).

source: Getty ImagesPittsburgh Penguins – A well-run organization that might kick themselves for signing most of their deals before all the loophole contracts started filtering through.

James Neal ($2.88M) – This choice is a leap of faith based on the kind of numbers he could put up skating alongside Sidney Crosby or Evgeni Malkin.

Kris Letang ($3.5M) – His numbers plummeted after Crosby and Malkin were out, but he’s a high-scoring blueliner when those two are healthy. It’s tough to argue with Letang at $2 million less than what Sergei Gonchar is making.

Honorable mentions: Jordan Staal (it’s tough to believe that his cap hit is evolving into a small bargain) and Brent Johnson (a cheap, dependable backup).

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Feel free to point out any glaring omissions or faulty inclusions. Again, remember: players on their entry-level deals don’t count so that’s why you won’t see the James van Riemsdyks of the world.