Tag: arbitration


Report: Wild’s Haula files for arbitration


Minnesota Wild forward Erik Haula filed for salary arbitration on Sunday, according to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune’s Michael Russo.

In case you’re not seasoned in this phase of the offseason, here’s a reminder: the Wild and Haula could reach an agreement before a hearing takes place. In fact, it’s not that uncommon for agreements to take place mere hours before scheduled discussions.

(As you may also know, it’s generally preferred to avoid the sometimes-arduous, bridge-burning elements of arbitration, too.)

Haula’s earning power is tough to gauge. Here’s how his expiring contract broke down in both 2013-14 and 2014-15: $900K salary at the NHL level, $67,500 in the AHL, $850K performance bonus and $90K signing bonus.

The 24-year-old scored seven goals and 14 points in 72 games with the Wild last season while also generating a goal in two postseason contests. His calling card would likely be the 2014 playoffs, as he scored four goals and seven points in 13 playoff games.

We’ll see if the two sides can hash out an agreement. If not, an arbitrator might need to determine how that production would translate into a contract.

Roussel, Stars set arbitration targets

Antoine Roussel

The Dallas Stars are going to hope forward Antoine Roussel isn’t as much of an agitator in the court room as he is on the ice.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman reports Roussel has asked for $2.35 million in arbitration and the Stars have countered with $1.15 million. The 24-year-old Frenchman is coming off a two-year contract that paid him $1.225 million.

Roussel was a revelation for the Stars last season scoring 14 goals with 29 points and functioning as an instant irritant for opponents around the league. The 209 penalty minutes he racked up last season showed he’s got a bit of the Pat Verbeek-Brad Marchand kind of thing going for him. He’s also not afraid of dropping the gloves, even in the playoffs.

As with all potential arbitration cases, things can be settled before they head to court. The $1.2 million difference between the two sides indicates there’s a bit of ground to make up, but makes for a good potential spot halfway between demands for arbitrator. Regardless, Roussel is getting a raise out of it. Question is: How much?

Leafs, Franson far apart in arbitration submissions

Cody Franson

If Cody Franson is going to get a deal done with the Toronto Maple Leafs, both sides may want to avoid having an arbitrator figure it out.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman reported both sides have made their submissions for what they believe Franson should be paid next season and they’re a bit far apart. Franson asked for $4.2 million while the Leafs believe he should be paid $2 million. That difference of $2.2 million means a hearing could get ugly between both sides.

The trick with arbitration is that a judge can settle things by picking a number in the middle or set the reward for more than what Franson asked for. Since he’s a year away from becoming an unrestricted free agent, Franson can only get a one-year decision. According to CapGeek, the Maple Leafs are currently $11 million under the salary cap.

Last season, Franson had five goals and 33 points in 79 games. He had 29 points during the lockout-shortened 2013 season. The Leafs may want to settle this before it goes to court. Then again, they attempted to deal Franson to the Montreal Canadiens for Josh Gorges only to see Gorges enact his no-trade clause.

Report: Rangers’ Brassard, Zuccarello, Kreider file for arbitration

Derick Brassard, Mats Zuccarello

The New York Rangers have three key forwards as restricted free agents and all three of them want arbitration.

Larry Brooks of the New York Post reports Derick Brassard, Mats Zuccarello, and Chris Kreider have all filed for arbitration. In case you’ve forgotten, arbitration can get awkward if it reaches a hearing as the player and team make a case for what they feel they should be paid/pay out.

The upside here is this buys time to continue negotiations to get a long-term deal done. That’s just what the Rangers would like to do with these three forwards as they were instrumental in getting the team to the Stanley Cup Final last season.

Brassard is coming off a four-year, $12.8 million deal with a $3.2 million cap hit. Zuccarello is coming off a one-year, $1.15 million contract while Kreider just completed his entry-level contract that had an $800,000 cap hit.

All three players should expect raises and, according to CapGeek.com, the Rangers have just over $14 million in cap space. They have one other restricted free agent in defenseman John Moore.

Next summer shaping up to be a nightmare for Predators

Pekka Rinne

This has certainly been an interesting offseason for the Nashville Predators. They acquired the much-maligned Brett Lebda, they’ve wondered about Francis Bouillon’s concussion and availability for next season, and even unveiled new jerseys. But head and shoulders above all other stories have been the Shea Weber contract negotiations and subsequent salary arbitration hearings.

The negotiations came to a head when the independent arbitrator gave Weber the highest award in the history of NHL arbitration with a one-year deal worth $7.5 million. The deal is especially constricting for a team that already operates on a budget, but the money isn’t even the worst part of the deal for the Predators. Since Weber is set to become a restricted free agent again next season, each of the Predators “Big 3” are set to be free agents on July 1, 2012. This offseason is nothing compared to the impending fiasco for GM David Poile and the Predators next season.

Stu Hackel from Sports Illustrated knows these three impending contracts could change the way the Predators do business:

“It has not been Poile’s modus operandi with the Predators to make splashy big-name acquisitions, and the team’s fiscal restraints have played a deciding role in that. Now that they know what their salary structure looks like and can project what it might look like after re-upping Suter and Rinne, we’ll see whether it triggers a new era in Nashville or leaves them as a lower-spending team that may be forced to part with high-priced talent.”

Next season, Pekka Rinne is set to make $3.4 million in the last year of his contract before he becomes an unrestricted free agent. Likewise, defenseman Ryan Suter will make $3.5 in the last year of his deal before unrestricted free agency. Mix in Weber’s $7.5 million and the Predators have $14.4 million dedicated to three players next season. The Predators have never officially announced their payroll budget, but last season the Predators spent $50.9 against the salary cap. Barring any unforeseen changes to management or their organization strategy, it’s safe to assume they’ll be in the same ballpark for the immediate future.

The problem is that the $14.4 million for all three players is the good news. The bad news is that Weber is likely to get a similar type salary if he performs at the same level he’s established over the last two years. Pekka Rinne has been one of the best goaltenders in the NHL over the last three seasons and was finally rewarded with a Vezina nomination this year. His .930 save percentage and 2.12 goals against average put him among the league’s elite—and people are finally taking notice. With guys like Henrik Lundqvist, Cam Ward, Ryan Miller, and Niklas Backstrom all making over $6 million per season and Ilya Bryzgalov signing a 9-year deal worth $5.6 million per season, Rinne is in line for a sizeable raise.

In the same way, Ryan Suter has been outplaying his current 4-year, $14 million contract. Looking at his numbers, play on the ice, leadership, and importance to the Predators, Suter is also in for a big raise. At the 2010 Olympics, he showed the world that he was an elite player with or without his better-known defense partner. In fact, many at the games said that Suter was the best defenseman on the ice for Team USA. When he hits the unrestricted market, it wouldn’t be surprising to see him get a contract in the Andrei Markov/James Wisniewski/Duncan Keith neighborhood. For those of you keeping track at home, that means he’ll be looking at an estimated cap hit around $5.5 million.

GM David Poile spoke about Ryan Suter and Pekka Rinne:

“They’re both unrestricted this year. All of our focus has been on Shea’s situation to this point. I would much prefer to get into training camp to get everybody there, to see how good our team is, to sit down with Shea again, Sutes and Pekka at the appropriate time and see how everybody thinks.”

Poile and the Predators will have their work cut out for them over the next 11 months. Not only do they have to worry about the three big name free agents in Weber, Rinne, and Suter, but they have other pieces that are also up for new contracts at season’s end. If the team decides to move away from Pekka Rinne, they’ll have to address pending restricted free agent Andres Lindback. The next blueliner set to take the next step in the NHL from Nashville’s defenseman factory is Jonathan Blum—who is a restricted free agent next season. Up front, they’ll have to deal with restricted free agents Sergei Kostitsyn, Blake Geoffrion, Cal O’Reilly, and Colin Wilson.

And we thought this offseason was interesting.