Andrew Cogliano

Andrew Cogliano chokes up talking about the end of his iron-man streak

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An emotional Andrew Cogliano said having his iron-man streak ended by suspension was a “tough pill to swallow.”

Speaking to Fox Sports’ Kent French prior to the Anaheim Ducks 3-1 loss against the Colorado Avalanche on Monday, Cogliano choked up when asked about how tough the past 24 hours had been like for him.

“It’s a tough pill to swallow, I’m not going to lie,” Cogliano said, fighting back tears. “I’ve played hard and I’ve battled. I’m a professional in that I’ve played a long time and I’ve now missed a game.”

Cogliano was suspended Sunday for two games following an illegal check to the head of Los Angeles Kings forward Adrian Kempe in a 4-2 Ducks win on Saturday.

The ban ended the NHL’s fourth-longest games played streak at 830 games for Cogliano, who had never missed action in his 11-year NHL career before Monday.

Cogliano was a 134 games shy of Doug Jarvis’ record of 964 consecutive games played, which the Ducks forward would have reached at the start of the 2019-2020 if he remained healthy.

“First and foremost I think, I probably initiated contact too late,” Cogliano said. “I’ve been very open about that with this process, and I made a mistake at that time.

“As I think about the hit though, I watch it and I still see that my body doesn’t change through the process of it. I think my shoulders are low, my elbows are low, my knees are bent and I’m in a pretty set position. As it evolves, he tries to make a play back across my body, which ends up maybe initiating some head contact near my upper back area. That’s what I see. I think there’s no injury, he came back and played. At the end of the day from what I’ve seen, it is a situation where we closed the gap on each other a little bit.”

Despite the hit, which clearly showed Cogliano nail Kempe in the head well after the puck had left the vicinity, Cogliano was surprised about hearing he was going to have a chat with the league.

“I was told after the game from Bob [Murray] that I was going to have a hearing or have a call,” Cogliano said. “I was surprised because no one said anything after the game to me otherwise. There was no media talking about it or nothing was brought up, so I was more surprised about that. Initially, I was thinking back on it, wondering what happened and wondering if I did anything bad.

“Obviously, you never want to injure anyone on the ice. That’s a fact. I’ve played 11 years and that’s one thing that I have stood behind and I’m glad he played the rest the game. From my end, there’s zero intent to do any sort of head contact or hit a person to injure them. I think it was a situation where I admitted to initiating contact too late and I think it was something that happened that ended up being very unfortunate for me.”

Cogliano said his teammates, and at least one Ducks legend, have offered their support.

“I’m probably being too dramatic about it. I’m sorry my emotions came out for whatever reason. I have had a lot of support.” Cogliano said. “I think there has been a lot of people that have reached out and initiated that I have done something special. The more I look back on it, it’s pretty cool. I think that playing 830 games in a row, not a lot of guys can say that and I think that’s something that I will hold to my heart.

“I appreciate all the texts. [Teemu] Selanne has been a big advocate in terms of reaching out. I may be making too big a deal of it, but I think when you go through the process and think back about coming to work and playing every single game for 11 straight years, it holds some value and holds some value to a lot of the guys in the league. Like I said, this is the last way I wanted it to go out. I’m glad he wasn’t injured and I’ll take the suspension, move on and come back and help my team.”


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Andrew Cogliano’s 830-game ironman streak ends with suspension

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The fourth-longest games played streak in NHL history has come to an end via suspension.

Andrew Cogliano of the Anaheim Ducks has been suspended two game for interfering with Adrian Kempe of the Los Angeles Kings Saturday night. Cogliano delivered a late hit that will see the end of his 830-game ironman streak.

Here’s the NHL Department of Player Safety’s reasoning:

It’s a good call by the DoPS. As the video shows, you can see just how late Cogliano delivers the hit on Kempe. So much time had passed, Kempe was not expecting to be hit like he was.

Cogliano has never missed a game in his NHL career since breaking in at the start of the 2007-08 season. Had he remained in the Ducks’ lineup for the rest of this regular season, he would have passed Steve Larmer (884) next month. Anaheim handed him a three-year extension this week, which meant Doug Jarvis’ record of 964 consecutive games played would have been threatened at the start of the 2019-20 season.

So who is the new NHL Ironman? That would be Keith Yandle of the Florida Panthers, who’s played 676 straight regular season games. Right behind him is Toronto Maple Leafs forward Patrick Marleau (669) and Phil Kessel of the Pittsburgh Penguins (655).

All good things come to an end, but it’s too bad that Cogliano’s shot at a tough-to-reach NHL record is ending due to a suspension. Not missing one of 830 regular season games is an impressive feat, and now it’ll be fun to watch Yandle, Marleau and Kessel try and stay healthy to threaten Jarvis’ record.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Andrew Cogliano’s player safety hearing could put ironman record in jeopardy

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Andrew Cogliano is 134 shy of Doug Jarvis’ ironman streak of 964 games played in a row.

And that’s as close as he might get pending the outcome of a hearing with the NHL’s player safety department on Sunday.

Yes, Cogliano’s streak of 830 games played — the longest active streak in the NHL — is in real jeopardy after an illegal check to the head of Los Angeles Kings forward Adrian Kempe in Saturday’s 4-2 win for Cogliano’s Anaheim Ducks.

Cogliano was handed a two-minute penalty for interference on the play, and his shoulder’s principal point of contact was clearly Kempe’s head. (You can watch several angles of the play if you click on the Streamable link in the tweet).

Cogliano has never missed a game in his 11-year NHL career.

On Friday, Cogliano signed a new three-year contract extension for the Ducks.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Ducks’ Andrew Cogliano set to play in 800th consecutive NHL game

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When Andrew Cogliano steps on to the SAP Center ice Saturday night he’ll hit a milestone that only three other NHL players have reached in the 100-year history of the league.

That feat will be joining Steve Larmer, Garry Unger and Doug Jarvis by playing in his 800th consecutive game.

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The 30-year-old forward isn’t one to talk about the streak much, which started when broke into the league at age 20. In today’s game, even as players take care of their bodies in ways better than before, it’s quite amazing Cogliano has avoided injury that would cause him to sit out at least one game. The other thing, as he told the Orange County Register’s Eric Stephens, is that no coach in his 11-season career has decided he needed to spend a night as a healthy scratch.

“I think as I keep playing I hope that continues,” he said. “I just wanted to be someone who is a guy that the coaches want in because they think you’re helping the team.”

The way Cogliano takes care of his body has always amazed teammates. It helped that growing up his mother was a fitness instructor, emphasizing being active and eating healthy. When he reached the NHL, he began training with Matt Nichol, the creator of BioSteel and trainer of numerous athletes. These days he works with Andy O’Brien, Director of Sport Science and Performance for the Pittsburgh Penguins.

“You can really look at a guy like him and learn a lot in terms of how he prepares for games, how he prepares for the summer, what he puts into his body, the rest that he gets,” said former teammate Sam Gagner. “I don’t think there’s anybody that’s a better pro in the league. You look up to Cogs for what he’s been able to accomplish and hopefully he keeps going on for a long, long time.”

As Cogliano told me last year, it was those early days with the Edmonton Oilers, being around veterans like Shawn Horcoff, Steve Staios, Jarret Stoll and Ethan Moreau, that opened his eyes to just what it takes to last in this league. That early education could pay off with a remarkable record.

If Cogliano, an unrestricted free agent this summer, continues his streak, he’ll pass Jarvis during game No. 15 of the 2019-20 NHL season.

“I think if it wasn’t for me being in Edmonton maybe I wouldn’t be how I am now,” he said.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

Ducks continue to load up with one-year deal for Santorelli

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The team that made the 2015 Stanley Cup champions sweat the most just keeps getting better.

The Anaheim Ducks added another piece to their war chest on Monday, signing Mike Santorelli to a one-year contract. Anaheim didn’t provide financial details, but ESPN’s Craig Custance reports that it’s worth $875K.

Jonathan Toews said the Ducks were the toughest team his champion Chicago Blackhawks faced during the 2015 postseason, and it seems like the Ducks are trying to cover every conceivable reason why they fell short of beating the ‘Hawks.

By adding Carl Hagelin and now Santorelli, 29, to the mix, Anaheim is a much faster team; they also boast a fleet-footed defense and fellow speedster Andrew Cogliano.

The Ducks’ mix now boasts a little extra beef and experience in bringing in Chris Stewart, Kevin Bieksa and Shawn Horcoff.

Remarkably, the franchise still boasts a ton of cap space, so they can make a splash at the trade deadline next season if they identify a missing piece.

Speaking of trade deadline pickups, Santorelli was part of a deal that didn’t really work out for his most recent team. The Nashville Predators gave up a boatload of assets for Santorelli and current UFA Cody Franson, yet neither really fit the bill.

Getting acquainted with linemates during training camp could be a big difference-maker for a quality depth forward like Santorelli, however, and it’s a pretty low-risk move for the Ducks.

Many are quite excited about the work GM Bob Murray has done this summer, by the way:

Indeed, it’s a pretty intriguing mix in Anaheim:

Would you pencil the Ducks in as the Cup favorites at this point? If not, where would they belong?