Tag: Alexander Frolov

Sean Avery

Sean Avery will not be charged for allegedly shoving a police officer


It looks as if Sean Avery won’t have to worry about any further legal issues in California stemming from his August 5 arrest for allegedly shoving a police officer.

TMZ reports that Avery won’t be charged for allegedly shoving a police officer after police responded to his Hollywood home for a noise complaint. If what TMZ reports about the situation is also true, this was much ado about nothing.

But according to law enforcement sources, a further investigation revealed that no officer was ever actually pushed.

We’re told the officer who made the battery report did so after his foot was caught in Avery’s front door — and multiple witnesses have corroborated the story.

Well if that’s the case this really is much ado about nothing. That’s not say that Avery was acting the right way in trying to close the door on the police, but still, charging a guy with battery for that comes off as outrageous.

For Avery, barring any further raucous partying in New York or Los Angeles, this should clear the way for him to prepare for the upcoming season. With the Rangers having more than a full boat of forwards at training camp in September and the Rangers with a pressing situation near the salary cap, there’s talk that Avery could be a candidate to be buried in the AHL if things don’t shape up right.  Of course, he could also wind up on the first line with Brad Richards and Marian Gaborik too.

You can never say Avery is a boring guy, however. This summer was especially busy for him as he spent part of the offseason fighting for marriage equality in New York and the other part dealing with these allegations as well as former teammate Alexander Frolov telling a Russian newspaper that Avery used racial slurs on the ice to provoke them, an allegation Frolov later denied making.

Alex Frolov tells Russian media that Sean Avery used racist remarks to agitate opponents

Sean Avery

It’s a fact that whenever Sean Avery is made a part of a story the story takes on a life of its own. That’s part of the price when you’re a player as widely disliked as Avery is. When Alexander Frolov, a former teammate of Avery’s in Los Angeles and New York with the Rangers, had a chance to speak with Russian website sports.ru about him, one of his stories is a bit startling.

Frolov, who will be playing in the KHL next season, was asked by sports.ru about what it was like to play alongside Avery. With Avery being such a polarizing and controversial figure in the NHL, it only makes sense to ask what it’s like to play with someone like that.

Slava Malmud of sport-express.ru translates the Q&A portion of the interview with Frolov to give us his startling words.

Q: You have played with Avery for the Kings and Rangers and once called him your friend.
AF: Yes, we are friends and we still communicate. Just not as often, since we live on different continents now.

Q: Why does everyone hate him?
AF: It’s not hate, it’s… He has a specific role, he is a pretty unique man and he likes to do, let’s say, extravagant things. Sometimes they’d be bordering on the forbidden. He isn’t a fool. Lately he has become calmer, smarter. Before he’d get swept away with emotions and do something stupid. To mention each and every one of his stunts… Something always happens around him, it’s a part of his job. He needs to be talked about. He loves it, he feels at home in the spotlight. Sometimes he called opponents “black monkeys.” He did a lot of things, I can’t remember all of them.

All right, that’s a huge bomb to drop after you’ve left town, but Frolov is speaking frankly about a guy who is his friend and a guy who he’s seen go from being a wild hellion on the ice in Los Angeles to a (slightly) more reserved and peaceable activist and fashion conscious guy in New York. We’re almost positive that everyone will blow these quotes out of proportion, but there is a point in history where an allegation was made against Avery for saying as much to a player.

Back in 2005 when Avery was with the Kings, then Edmonton Oilers enforcer Georges Laraque accused Avery of calling him a “monkey” to incite him into action. Avery, in true style for how he was in his more out of control days, said that Laraque made the whole thing up.

“(He) fabricated the whole thing,” Avery said in Friday’s edition of the Los Angeles Times.

“I have no idea why he would do that,” he added. “I heard about it after the game and was surprised.”

Laraque, who is black, alleged Avery made a racial remark during Edmonton’s 3-1 loss. Laraque said that when he went to challenge Avery to a fight after the Kings agitator got tangled up with Oilers finesse player Ales Hemsky, Avery declined to fight and called Laraque “a monkey.”

Since Avery’s days in Los Angeles that saw him get so out of control he racked up north of 250 penalty minutes in back-to-back seasons, he’s gotten counseling for his temper and his attitude to make him be a better person both on and off the ice. Avery’s work in New York State to help get marriage equality passed has earned him kudos from a wide range of fans both hockey and in life. This story and these quotes from Frolov won’t do him any favors, but we’d have to hope that this sort of hateful nonsense is all in his past.

The role of a pest on the ice is always to push the boundaries of good taste and even ethics in order to goad your opponents into taking a bad penalty that could hurt their team. In Avery’s past, he may or may not have done things that would make anyone in their right mind think poorly of him. He may still do it now. Who knows?

The fact is, we haven’t heard of anything from Avery relating to such hateful things in years and Frolov sharing his story so flippantly means that it’s all in the past. That’s not to excuse him for doing these things back then, but before you form the line to protest the man, just know that everyone changes and sometimes it’s for the better.

Avery is a different guy now. He’s just as good at getting under an opponent’s skin as he ever has been, but there’s a difference in how he goes about it now as opposed to six or seven years ago when there was more malice to his work. It’s not to say that he’s a Zen master now, but his speckled past coming back to bite him now seems a bit much.

Alex Frolov not happy with ice time; wants to be traded?

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To say that Alex Frolov has had a disappointing season so far for the New York Rangers would be entirely too accurate. Frolov to this point has five goals and six assists. Coming off of a frustrating final season in Los Angeles, Frolov was hoping to go to New York and regain his old 30-plus goal scoring form. For a guy that’s 28 years-old it wasn’t unreasonable to take a chance on him, especially after butting heads with Kings coach Terry Murray.

Today, an interview with Frolov came out courtesy of Russian newspaper Sport-Express (link is Russian) and from what Frolov apparently had to say with them, he’s less than pleased with how things are going in Manhattan. Frolov apparently has issues with how he’s being used, how much playing time he gets and how Rangers head coach John Tortorella wants him to play. Sounds like fun. Beyond the Blueshirts has the translated excerpts for us to gawk at. The juiciest bit of the bunch is this question after sounding off about everything that’s troubling him.

– But you haven’t thought about a trade?

– Not yet. I really hope that after my conversation with Tortorella something changes. But if everything stays the same, then I’ll start to think [about it]…

Well then. A guy with 11 points thinking about demanding a trade after having issues fitting in with the Kings and, so far, the Rangers as well doesn’t provide much in the way of leverage. Of course, it would also help if Frolov had actually said those things too. Andrew Gross of Ranger Rants clears things up with Frolov and finds out that things are not as they might appear.

“It was a Russian guy and he asked me if I had some kind of fight with Torts, if there was some conflict going on,” Frolov said. “I said, ‘No.’”

“I had a conversation with Tortos but there’s no fighting, no conflict going on,” Frolov added. “Obviously, when you’re not playing enough, you want to play more, like any player.

“It was a good conversation,” Frolov said, adding he hasn’t seen the Russian article or the English translation. “I’m trying to work as hard as I can. I’ve improved in some areas. It’s a long season, there are lots of situations that can happen.”

I asked Frolov if he was happy in New York.

“Yeah, I am,” Frolov said. “He asked me about a trade. I said I never think about it. I’ve never asked for a trade. I didn’t discuss it with Torts. I guess he was trying to make up a story or to find something.”

Controversy averted for sure. Of course, having a meeting with Tortorella to discuss thing can be an uncomfortable situation. Torts is one intimidating human to talk to, something I’m happy/scarred to vouch for personally. Of course, if Frolov wants to avoid chatter like this, putting the puck in the net often is a good way to make sure people start talking about you in more positive ways. Five goals through nearly 30 games played is miserable for a guy who makes his living scoring.

A change has to happen or else living on the fourth line or in the press box will be more common than not.