Tag: Alex Semin

Edmonton Oilers v Carolina Hurricanes

Semin benched after taking unsportsmanlike penalty


Trailing 3-0 and still in search of their first win, one would think the Carolina Hurricanes would want a dangerous goal-scorer like Alex Semin on the ice.

One would be wrong.

Semin barely played at all during last night’s third period in Vancouver, his coach making the decision to bench the 30-year-old, who was sent to the box for unsportsmanlike conduct with 16 minutes left in the contest.

“He’d played enough,” coach Bill Peters said, per NHL.com. “I don’t think we need to take undisciplined penalties when we are trying to dig out of a hole, right? You’re in a hole. Quit digging.”

Not that Semin has been a dangerous scorer this season anyway. Suffice to say, no goals and just two assists in eight games is not what’s expected of a player with a $7 million cap hit. Though to be fair, last night’s penalty was his first of 2014-15. (Capitals fans will remember his many trips to the box during his time in Washington.)

The Hurricanes went on to lose, 4-1.

Related: Refs ‘have it out’ for Semin

‘Canes re-sign Olympic d-man Faulk: six years, $29 million

Justin Faulk

The under-fire Carolina Hurricanes made a big move for the future of their blueline on Monday, signing Justin Faulk to a six-year, $29 million contract extension.

Faulk, 22, was a pending RFA in the final year of his entry-level contract. The extension will see him get paid $2.5 million in 2014-15, $3.5 million in 2015-16, $5.5 million in 2016-17 and 2017-18, and $6 million in 2018-19 and 2019-20, for an average annual cap hit of $4.833 million.

“Justin has proven to be among the best young defensemen in the league as confirmed by his selection to the U.S. Olympic team,” ‘Canes GM Jim Rutherford said in a statement. “He has been and will continue to be the anchor of the Hurricanes’ defense for years to come.”

One of the few bright spots in what’s been an extremely disappointing campaign for Carolina, Faulk sits second among all ‘Canes d-men in points (24) and time on ice per game (23:22). He was, as mentioned, named to the U.S. Olympic team that finished fourth in Sochi, drawing into the lineup after Pittsburgh defenseman Paul Martin suffered a broken hand during the tournament.

The 37th overall pick at the 2010 NHL Entry Draft, Faulk has emerged as one of the best defensemen of his draft class and became a quality contributor at the NHL level faster than a number of higher drafted blueliners, including Dylan McIlrath (10th overall, Rangers), Brandon Gormely (13th overall, Coyotes) and Derek Forbort (15th overall, Kings).

As for the ‘Canes, re-upping with Faulk was a no-brainer — what will be interesting, though, is to see if the man in charge of signing players, Rutherford, is allowed to continue. There have been reports that “major changes” could be coming in Carolina and Rutherford, who committed over $130 million to Jordan Staal, Alex Semin and Jeff Skinner, could be part of the shakeup.

Frustrated Muller rips ‘Canes: ‘Losing is for losers’


The Carolina Hurricanes are primed to miss the playoffs for the fifth straight season — the second under head coach Kirk Muller — and, on Monday, Muller voiced his frustration about the lack of winning.

From the Raleigh News & Observer:

At the end of the team practice at Raleigh Center Ice, Muller gathered his players around him on the ice for a few words. He was loud and his message clear.

Muller talked of “wanting guys who want to make a difference.” He said “losing is for losers” and that too many of the players were cheating and “playing their own way.”

Too many, he said, were “playing for the scoresheet” and worried about getting theirs. Some were more worried about new contracts, he said, and others about somehow holding on and playing another year in NHL.

Carolina has been one of the NHL’s biggest disappointments over the last two seasons, especially given all the money GM Jim Rutherford has spent on talent acquisition. Nearly $130 million was committed to the Jordan Staal, Alex Semin and Jeff Skinner trio and while all three have had their moments, it hasn’t been enough to keep the ‘Canes in the playoff hunt.

Looking ahead, it’ll be interesting to see what happens with the players Muller suggested were playing for new deals.

Carolina only has 13 players under contract for next season, and has decisions to make on a number of key UFAs — including veteran defensemen Joni Pitkanen and Ron Hainsey, and veteran forwards Manny Malhotra and Radek Dvorak.

There are also a number of RFAs the team will need to decide on as well: Jiri Tlusty, Andrei Loktionov, Drayson Bowman, Nathan Gerbe, Brett Bellemore and, most importantly, Olympic defenseman Justin Faulk, who figures to be in line for a sizable raise on the $840,000 he made this season.

For all the players with uncertain futures, one thing is clear — Muller and the ‘Canes are using the final few games of this season as an audition for next year and beyond.

“We’re moving forward,” Muller said. “If you want to fit in, show it. Do it with work. I don’t want guys who don’t show up, who have bad body language. We’re going to practice hard, we’re going to play hard and we’re going to win games.”

Five theories why the Russians lost

Sochi Olympics Ice Hockey Men

1. Their best players weren’t good enough

Save for Pavel Datsyuk, who was excellent, and Ilya Kovalchuk, who ended the tournament with three goals, including the only one versus the Finns. Alex Ovechkin, Evgeni Malkin, and Alex Semin all failed to produce the type of offense that was needed, given their talent. Alexander Radulov had six points in five games, but he also took two costly penalties in the shootout loss to the United States. Russian coach Zinetula Bilyaletdinov made specific mention of Ovechkin in the post-game press conference, saying he couldn’t explain why such a great goal-scorer could only score once in five games. Speaking of the coach…

2. Bilyaletdinov coached poorly

Also during the press conference, one of the reporters chastised Bilyaletdinov for not splitting up Ovechkin and Malkin. Another questioned the way Valeri Nichushkin was deployed. And, of course, the choice of goaltender for the Finland game will be questioned. Why Semyon Varlamov and not last year’s Vezina Trophy winner, Sergei Bobrovsky? The first Finland goal that Varlamov allowed was stoppable. Not only that, it came within two minutes of Kovalchuk’s opener, making it an untimely, stoppable shot. Bilyaletdinov, by the way, said he wanted to remain coach, but admitted that the decision was not up to him.

3. The pressure was too much

Teemu Selanne said he could sense the Russians’ frustration growing as the game wore on: “We knew that they were tired.” Similarly, Sami Salo said he could “only imagine the kind of pressure” the hosts were under. Maybe it was the pressure that got to them, maybe it wasn’t. When a team presses, you often see individuals try to take over, instead of trusting that the system will pay off, and we probably saw a bit of that versus the Finns. Having said that, before the tournament started, Ken Holland had some cautionary words about assuming that pressure was a factor in a team’s performance: “Sometimes that it is the case. Sometimes…these are good teams.” Which brings us to this…

4. This may have been an upset, but Finland is no pushover

“I think the turning point for our tournament was the Canada game,” said Selanne. “In the first period, we were a little bit nervous. A lot of guys had never played against the best players in the world, but they saw and they realized they can compete against those guys. The whole body language changed. Now we believe we can beat anybody.” Finland also has Tuukka Rask, and that can’t be ignored. From Jim Craig to Dominik Hasek, we’ve seen goaltenders steal games in the Olympics before. Not to discount the timely offensive plays made by Selanne, Juhamatti Aaltonen, and Mikael Granlund, but the Russians outshot Finland, 38-22, meaning Rask was forced to make 37 saves. A good team that works hard and believes in itself can do big things with a great goalie.

5. The entire team just wasn’t good enough

Granted, most expected the Russians to get beyond the quarterfinals, but let’s not pretend they were the favorites here. We weren’t the only ones asking if expectations were too high, but for the record, we definitely did. This is a team that came into the Olympics with questionable depth and a questionable blue line. In the end, those two factors weren’t the main reasons they lost, but they didn’t help either. Just look how much Drew Doughty has boosted the Canadians’ offense from the back end. Only one Russian defenseman, Anton Belov, finished with a goal in Sochi.

OK, so that’s five theories. Feel free to add yours below, or disagree with mine. I’m off to watch the United States-Czech Republic game. Good hockey day today. (Unless you’re Russian.)

U.S.- Russia: Three things to watch

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 13: Jonathan Quick #32 of United States in action against Slovakia during the Men's Ice Hockey Preliminary Round Group A game on day six of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Shayba Arena on February 13, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

The showcase game of the Olympic preliminary round goes this evening in Sochi, as the United States meets the host Russians at the Bolshoy Ice Dome. Here are three things to watch, besides the hostile crowd.

1. Jonathan Quick: Will make his second consecutive start for the U.S. after allowing just one goal in Thursday’s 7-1 win over Slovakia. With another solid outing, the 2012 Conn Smythe Trophy winner should get the nod once the win-or-go-home games begin. But what if he isn’t so solid? Ryan Miller, the Americans’ best player in the 2010 Games, is waiting in the wings, and his NHL numbers this season are actually better than Quick’s. The U.S. plays its last game of the preliminary round tomorrow versus Slovenia. Head coach Dan Bylsma might be planning to start Miller in that one anyway, if only to avoid Quick playing three games in four nights. But — and this is pure speculation — if Quick has a rough outing versus the Russians, Miller could be auditioning for the starting job versus the Slovenians.

2. Top-end talent versus depth: The Russians have the edge in the former, with Alex Ovechkin, Evgeni Malkin, Alex Semin, Pavel Datsyuk, Ilya Kovalchuk and Alexander Radulov comprising their top six forwards. However, the Americans have the edge in the latter, at least based on what they displayed versus Slovakia. Bylsma was particularly complimentary of his fourth line, made up of Paul Stastny, T.J. Oshie and Max Pacioretty, and that trio could even see some time against the top Russians.

3. The officiating. The referees will be American Brad Meier and Swede Marcus Vinnerborg. If they call it tight, Russia’s loaded power play — which went 1-for-3 versus Slovenia — could be a big factor. Nothing against all the talented scorers on the Americans, but “blue-collar” teams who prides themselves on being “tough to play against” — Bylsma’s words — don’t typically want tightly officiated games.