Tag: Adrian Dater

Kipper Phaneuf

Here’s your annotated history of smoking in the NHL


Sports Illustrated’s Adrian Dater has compiled a great collection of hockey’s best smoking anecdotes.

Titled “When the NHL lit lamps and smokes“, Dater’s piece looks back at the laundry list of legends that routinely hacked darts — Stan Mikita, Guy Lafleur, Mario Lemieux, Mike Bossy and Denis Savard, to name a few.

Here’s a great bit from the article:

One of the most openly notorious NHL smokers of all was Al “Planet” Iafrate, a defenseman known for his big slap shot and bigger appetite for nicotine.

“I remember my first NHL exhibition game as an assistant with Philly (in 1990),” says Ken Hitchcock, who now coaches the St. Louis Blues. “We were in Washington, and I went to give the lineup to the referees and you had to walk by the Washington dressing room. And Al Iafrate was lighting up with a blowtorch for bending sticks. Coming from junior hockey, I found that rather unique.”

Anyone who covered the NHL when Iafrate played from 1984 until his retirement in 1998 as a San Jose Shark probably saw him sitting on a chair outside the dressing room with his shirt (and sometimes pants) off, puffing away. Legend has it that Iafrate once bummed a cigarette off an Ottawa reporter between periods, lighting it up in his customary blowtorch blaze of glory.

While the number of smokers in today’s NHL has dwindled, you still hear/see evidence of it from time to time. Montreal goalie Carey Price has been spotted burning coffin nails (see here and here), Dion Phaneuf and Miikka Kiprusoff were caught while teammates in Calgary (pictured above) and Alex Semin was busted at the 2010 World Championships (see here).

In a similar vein, there are plenty of players that use chewing tobacco. Todd Bertuzzi seemingly can’t go anywhere without his chaw, but the most dip-friendly team might be the Toronto Maple Leafs (Jonas Gustavsson, Tyler Bozak and yes, even GM Brian Burke.)

Finally, there are the cigar aficionados. Former Tampa Bay Lightning teammates Stan Neckar and Dave Anderychuk have taken their love of stogies to the next level, co-founding a line of mobile cigar lounges.

“Me and Dave would always smoke cigars,” Neckar said of his playing days. “The day we won a Cup, we smoked lots of them.”

Bold ideas for next Winter Classic include Colorado, Florida

Winter Classic Hockey

The Winter Classic is morphing into a prestige and money-laden event that represents hockey’s best answer to the Super Bowl. In its first five years, the event has bounced around Northeastern cities, but the calls for more exotic locales have been picking up with each passing year.

Here are two especially interesting ideas from today’s round of stories.

Taking the Winter Classic out West

Avalanche beat writer Adrian Dater paints an intriguing picture of a Winter Classic game in Colorado for Sports Illustrated:

Can you picture this?

It’s 25 degrees outside on an early January night and the Detroit Red Wings are taking to the ice against the Colorado Avalanche under the silhouette of the Rocky Mountains. More than 76,000 fans are packed inside Sports Authority Field in Denver, including — brace yourselves — TIM TEBOW.

One of the greatest rivalries in sports history — not just the NHL — is revived for one day at least. And in case the current Avs and Wings wouldn’t be enough of an attraction, there is the alumni game to consider.

I’m not quite sure the NHL should base its Winter Classic planning on the drawing power of a quarterback who might be old news by next year (Tebow), but the overall idea has some appeal. The alumni game would indeed be a beauty since many of those greats just recently retired. (Mike Keane was playing until 2010.)

Florida + retractable roof = gold?

The Miami Marlins have made a lot of noise during their transformation in the MLB’s off-season, so attempting to attract a Winter Classic to their new ballpark seems in character. It almost doesn’t sound completely ridiculous thanks to the building’s retractable roof, either.

Here are some interesting details about the bold idea via a great blog post by George Richards of the Miami Herald.

First, the ballpark would have toclose its retractable roof for about two weeks with the air conditioning running – and humidity lowered – while the ice sheet is built and maintained.

On game day, the roof would open for the outdoor affect.

One can only imagine the scenery an outdoor hockey game in the tropics would produce for a worldwide television audience. That imagery is what the Panthers would sell to the league. It’s a hook no other market has. Sure, Los Angeles has sun and palm trees; it doesn’t have the retractable roof.

Sure, the retractable roof seems kind of like cheating, but Richards writes that it would afford an opportunity to have NHL-quality ice. (That’s not necessarily a claim that could always be made during some of the rougher stretches of some Winter Classic games.) Beyond that, the lure of going to Miami for a combination of a New Year’s celebration and outdoor hockey is so stunning that my liver hurts just thinking about it.


As Richards wrote later on in that piece, a Winter Classic in Florida remains highly unlikely. That being said, the fact that the technology is in place to make that even feasible is exciting enough.

Moving on, tell us: where would you like to see the next Winter Classic? Feel free to base your choice(s) on whatever standards you’d like, from best overall experience to highest degree of difficulty and anything in between.

A “terrible hockey game” occurred last night in Colorado

Avs vs Stars

The Denver Post’s Adrian Dater is getting a tad frustrated covering the struggling Colorado Avalanche. For proof, here’s the first paragraph of his game story from last night:

Well, that was three hours you and I will never get back. What a terrible hockey game tonight at the Pepsi Center, in front of the lowest crowd of the season (12,015). Just awful.

The Avs lost the game, 3-1, to the Dallas Stars. No surprise there. After a surprising 6-2-0 start to the season, Colorado has gone 4-11-1.

We’ve highlighted Dater’s work before on PHT. On Nov. 18, he ripped pretty much everything about the languishing franchise. But last night’s bluster took it to a whole new level. It’s really worth the read. Here’s another taste:

Now let’s talk about Paul Stastny. He was terrible tonight. One shot on net, no points, 43-percent on faceoffs. He was slow all night, got outworked on loose pucks along the boards and generally as noticeable as a scoop of vanilla ice cream in a 10-foot snowbank. There is probably a reason why the Avalanche didn’t give him the captaincy, despite being the team’s highest-paid player and one of its more tenured players. Because he’s not leading by example. Period, end of story.


Columnist rips Avs’ home record, front office, identity…pretty much everything

Joe Sacco
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Longtime Colorado Avalanche reporter Adrian Dater took the club to task today in a scathing piece entitled “Avalanche lost in a haunted house.”

Dater aggressively questioned the direction of a team that, after starting the season 6-2-0, has lost nine of its last 11. Five of those losses have come at the Pepsi Center, where only 14,882 are showing up per night. (That’s 24th in NHL attendance.)

Three major issues with the Avs arise in the piece: 1) an inability to win at home, 2) the team’s lack of identity and 3) a muddled front office.

Dater, on Colorado’s home woes: “Trouble, like charity, begins at home. That has certainly been true for Denver’s once-proud NHL franchise, which was slated to start a record eight-game run there on Friday night against the Dallas Stars. Like the weather in Honolulu, such a favorable schedule would ordinarily be cause for some easy forecasting. Avs teams of yore would be expected to win a minimum of six and most likely did. But this most recent edition carried a 2-6-1 home mark into its game against Dallas, and was 5-19-2 overall in its previous 26 home outings.”

Dater, on the lack of identity: “Tuesday night in Pittsburgh, the Avs played a free-wheeling, fun, skilled game against the Penguins, taking a 3-1 lead and nearly building a bigger one if not for the stout defensive efforts of a couple of goalposts. In the third period, the Avs tried to slow things down and preserve their advantage. They played too much in their own end and left the arena on the nasty end of the 6-3 final score.

Then on Thursday night in St. Paul, the Avs took on the plodding, defense-minded Wild. Instead of skating like they did in Pittsburgh, they looked like they were trying to match each dump-and-change shift with Minnesota. The result? A competitive game, but a 1-0 loss.

Bottom line: the Avs play too much like the team they’re skating against and often abandon their own distinctive brand of hockey.”

Dater, on the front office: “The team’s ownership group, led by E. Stanley Kroenke and his son, Josh, are rarely seen at home games and they almost never talk publicly about the Avs (though Josh, an executive with the NBA’s Denver Nuggets, is often front and center at that team’s press conferences). Below the Kroenkes, former maestro GM Pierre Lacroix retains the title of team president, but he’s rarely around the building anymore too. His son, Eric, is the assistant GM to Greg Sherman. The great and popular [Joe] Sakic has the title of ‘executive adviser.’ Confused yet about really runs the show? The question of who’s in charge has been leveled at the guys upstairs as well as at the guys down on the ice.”

Dater also ripped Sherman’s highly-questionable trades (Craig Anderson-for-Brian Elliott, Chris Stewart/Kevin Shattenkirk-for-Erik Johnson/Jay McClement, Semyon Varlamov-for-1st/2nd round picks), the dragging of feet on naming Milan Hejduk captain (which had been vacant since Adam Foote retired) and the struggling young centerpieces of the team — Paul Stastny and and Matt Duchene.

This is uncharted territory for a team with such rich winning history. The Avs have won two Cups and made the playoffs 12 out of 15 seasons since moving to Colorado. Sure, the Avs have had down years before, but they always seemed to have strong leadership and a sense of direction — something that can’t be said for the current lot.

When looking at the Avalanche of today, one has to wonder what’s the end game.