Tag: Adam Deadmarsh

Nashville Predators v Colorado Avalanche

Concussions cut Adam Deadmarsh’s coaching career short


Los Angeles Kings fans are probably in a great state of mind right now, but there’s often the stray memory of lesser times. Take Adam Deadmarsh, for example, who went from Colorado Cup-winner to Kings injury casualty because of an array of issues, most notably concussion problems. Deadmarsh eventually settled into an assistant coaching gig with the Avalanche, but Adrian Dater passes along profoundly sad news: concussions cut his coaching career short, too.

The slightly bright side is that Deadmarsh will remain with the team in a front office role, just not on the bench where a variety of elements would likely exacerbate those problems.

Dater passes along a message from Deadmarsh’s wife Christa:

“Adam was hurt (concussion issues) this season and decided that health/family and safety are his priority … Adam enjoyed coaching, but this was the right decision … We are back in Idaho and will love being close to our family again:) Hello Idaho friends … we are home:)”

Sad stuff.

PHT Morning Skate: Where the Kings aren’t quite a machine

Jonathan Quick

PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

The Kings lost a game and that’s been pretty rare in the playoffs. Mark Whicker helps point out how human they are. (OC Register)

I can tell you haven’t had enough Loony Toons in your life. Jesse Spector of The Sporting News gives you all the Wile E. Coyote magic from Mike Smith that you can handle. (The Sporting News)

Know how the Devils shuffled their lines in practice yesterday? It’s OK, they said they’re not doing it as a panic move. (Fire & Ice)

Ever wonder what Stephane Matteau is up to? Wonder no more. Devils fans may not want to check it out. (New York Times)

Looks like Sylvain Lefebvre and Adam Deadmarsh will be back as assistants in Colorado. (All Things Avs)

The Wild have until June 1 to get Finnish phenom Mikael Granlund signed. That isn’t looking like a problem. (Russo’s Rants)

Ethan Moreau looks back at his time with Oilers, hopes to play until he’s 40

Ethan Moreau

When word surfaced that the Los Angeles Kings were on the verge of signing banged-up winger Ethan Moreau to a one-year, $600K contract, the reactions ranged from mildly supportive to a shoulder shrug to stunned criticism.

Aside from the most blindly supportive members of the Kings’ front office and equally optimistic fans, it’s likely that Moreau is the only person who expects the move to be a slam dunk. Jonathan Willis points out the most obvious problem – though not necessarily the only issue – that comes with signing the soon-to-be 36 year old winger: his lack of health. He missed huge chunks of three of the last five seasons with wear-and-tear related injuries, with 186 games lost to various ailments during that five-year span.

It’s tough not to think of the Kings’ run of bad luck with injuries in the previous decade or so as a caveat while discussing their seemingly bright future. You may remember that semi-solid Los Angeles teams were derailed by injuries in many cases as the team saw players such as Pavol Demitra, Ziggy Palffy, Adam Deadmarsh and Jason Allison fall apart due to health issues.

The current Los Angeles roster features some obvious injury risks with Moreau, Simon Gagne and Justin Williams in the mix – especially since the latter two could play very important roles as scoring wingers. Even Anze Kopitar went down with a nasty ankle injury last season.

Many of us cannot help but second-guess the Kings’ decision to sign Moreau, but the team brought in the rugged former captain of the Edmonton Oilers with the hopes that he’ll provide veteran leadership. (It’s also likely that they’ll ask him to do the hockey equivalent of “Charlie work” such as spending time on the penalty kill and grinding out fourth line minutes.)

The biggest line on his resume is almost certainly his connection to the Oilers’ Cinderella run to just one win short of a Stanley Cup in 2006 (which happened to be the last time Moreau made a postseason appearance). He reflected on that run with Mayor’s Manor, calling it both the highest and lowest point of his career.

“Going to the Finals was probably the high and the low point,” he said, when speaking of his time playing in Edmonton. “We were one game away from winning a Stanley Cup. Then, losing was probably the low point because you come so close to realizing a dream that doesn’t happen – you’re left with a very, very empty feeling – which is motivation to get back there with this team and to win it. That’s the only thing that will kind of make that feeling go away.”

One cannot help but wonder if Moreau wonders if his career will go away before that feeling will dissipate. He told Mayor’s Manor that he hopes to play until he’s 40, but to do so, he’ll need to surprise onlookers who are far from convinced that he can turn around his health and all-around play. Willis points out some discouraging defensive numbers that indicate that Moreau’s time in the NHL is about to run out, but we’ll have to wait and see if this low-risk move by the Kings turns out to be an irritating (if small) waste of money or a nice bargain.

Colorado Avalanche promote Adam Deadmarsh to assistant coach

Joe Sacco

There are plenty of teams who reward former stars (and beloved role players) from former eras with the chance to work their way into the front office. The Carolina Hurricanes already have Ron Francis and Rod Brind’Amour wearing suits for them just a few years removed from their impressive playing days.

The Colorado Avalanche seem like they’re following that trend as well. They attempted to bring in Patrick Roy as their head coach before Joe Sacco (featured in this post’s main photo) eventually got the job. Joe Sakic is already a member of their front office, while they promoted another memorable piece of their glory days today. The team announced that former player Adam Deadmarsh has been promoted to assistant coach. One cannot help but wonder if recently retired defenseman Adam Foote might be next in line.

Deadmarsh spent two seasons as a video/development coach for Colorado, so it’s not like he was rushed to the top ranks on name recognition alone. Perhaps the most stunning thing – something that underscores a career cut short by injuries – is the fact that Deadmarsh is only 36 years old.

Deadmarsh, 36, joined the Avalanche coaching staff in the summer of 2009 and has spent the last two seasons as Colorado’s Video/Development Coach.  The Trail, B.C., native enjoyed a nine-year stint as a player in the NHL, appearing in 567 career games with the Quebec Nordiques/Colorado Avalanche and Los Angeles Kings.  He totaled 184 goals and 373 points with 819 penalty minutes.  Deadmarsh was part of the Avalanche’s first Stanley Cup championship team in 1996.

“Adam certainly deserves this opportunity,” said Avalanche Head Coach Joe Sacco.  “With his background, we feel he will be successful in his new role.”

The team also announced that Tim Army was named the new assistant coach (focusing on video analysis).

Army, 48, has spent the last six seasons as the head coach of his alma mater, Providence College (Hockey East).  Prior to joining the Friars, Army served as head coach of the Portland Pirates of the American Hockey League for three years from 2002-03 to 2004-05.  Army was an assistant coach in the NHL for nine seasons, spending four years with the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (1993-94 to 1996-97) and five years with the Washington Capitals (1997-98 to 2001-02).

The Providence, R.I., native was drafted by the Colorado Rockies in the ninth round (171st overall) of the 1981 NHL Entry Draft.  He played three seasons at Providence College and then two years of pro hockey before returning to the Friars as an assistant coach in 1988.

“Tim has coached at all levels of hockey,” said Sacco.  “His experience and passion will complete our staff very well.”

One other interesting bit: Steve Konowalchuk – another familiar name to hockey fans from the ’90s – will leave the Avalanche coaching staff to become the head coach for the Seattle Thunderbirds in the WHL. There is no word on whether or not he will receive a Ford Thunderbird for his troubles.

Marco Sturm trade to L.A. is now complete

Image (1) Sturm-thumb-250x172-10667-thumb-250x172-10668.jpg for post 1684

Good news for the Los Angeles Kings’ thin forward corps and the Boston Bruins’ shaky salary cap situation: the once-dead Marco Sturm trade is now officially done. Fluto Shinzawa of the Boston Globe reports that Sturm passed his physical and can now play for the second California NHL team of his career.

(He originally played for the San Jose Sharks when Dean Lombardi was part of that organization. You might remember Sturm as arguably the biggest piece that went to Boston in the lopsided Joe Thornton trade.)

Sturm is in the final year of a four-year deal that pays him $3.5 million per year (in both salary and salary cap hit), so while there is some cost to bringing him in, it’s not a huge gamble.

Considering his speed and injury-prone nature, it’s not that different from my summer time suggestions that the Kings trade for Simon Gagne. He doesn’t have the same high-scoring ceiling, but Sturm crossed the 20-goal mark seven times during his injury-ravaged 12 years in the league.

Of course, it’s hard not to look at some of the Kings’ recent history with injury prone players and wonder if they’re playing with fire. From Adam Deadmarsh to Jason Allison to Ziggy Palffy and Pavol Demitra, the Kings could have changed their team logo to Wile E. Coyote in the ’90s and early ’00s if it weren’t for Phoenix.

Still, they aren’t giving up much for a player who can provide scoring depth to a team that is a little too dependent on Anze Kopitar for goals. It seems like both the Bruins and Kings “won” from this deal, even if the gains are pretty modest.