Tag: 24/7

Eric Staal

PHT Morning Skate: No, the Hurricanes aren’t trading Eric Staal


PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Radio man Bill Watters crafted a Eric Staal-to-Toronto trade rumor. Thankfully Bob McKenzie is here to get the real truth. (Pension Plan Puppets, @TSNBobMcKenzie)

Last night’s most awkward quote of the night belonged to Bruce Boudreau: “This was the hardest I’ve seen any team work [under me] all season.” Yes, we’re juvenile. (@AnaheimDucks)

Brendan Shanahan is going door-to-door to teach teams about player safety and was just in Nashville. I picture Jordin Tootoo trying to shoot spitballs at him from across the room. (Tennessean)

Tim Thomas wasn’t happy getting pulled against Columbus the other night. He rebounded rather nicely last night against Ottawa. (CSNNE.com)

The Ducks welcomed Lubomir Visnovsky back to action last night, but put Saku Koivu on IR. (Sportsnet)

Taylor Hall isn’t going to change his playing style for anyone now that he’s healthy. Good thing, we’d hate to see him become an enforcer. (Winnipeg Free Press)

Kurtis Foster impressed the big boss, Lou Lamoriello, in his Devils debut. (Star-Ledger)

Nikolai Khabibulin is treating this season like his own DeLorean with how he’s turning back the clock. (Edmonton Journal)

The Sharks’ inconsistencies are about the only consistent thing to their season so far. (CSNBayArea.com)

Claude Noel is showing that he can juggle about as well as he can coach in Winnipeg. (Winnipeg Sun)

Chris Conner is the little engine that could in Detroit. Get it? He’s small. (Detroit Free Press)

Finally, if you missed last night’s episode of 24/7, you missed Ilya Bryzgalov’s fascinating take on the universe. (YouTube)

Rangers prepare for their close-up on HBO’s 24/7

John Tortorella

Technically, the NHL still hasn’t officially announced this year’s Winter Classic on January 2nd between the New York Rangers and Philadelphia Flyers at Citizen’s Bank Ballpark. Yet on Wednesday, the hockey world was given even more proof that the Rangers and Flyers will be participants in the league’s mid-season showcase as HBO’s cameras invaded Rangers practice. The network behind the critically acclaimed 24/7 series was on the scene to capture promotional footage for the mini-series that will air in the weeks leading up to the Winter Classic.

After learning all about the show last year, there are two major questions surrounding the series this season. First, from a competitive standpoint, how quickly will the players be able to ignore the omnipresent cameras. Newly acquired Rangers forward Mike Rupp experienced 24/7 with the Pittsburgh Penguins:

“It takes a couple of days to get used to it. They’re good guys. My experience is that they don’t have crews who are like, ‘We need our footage,’ and will do whatever it takes to get it. They’re easy-going guys who are sensitive to some of the different things we do.”

For both the Rangers and Flyers sake, they’ll hope to acclimate themselves to the cameras as quickly as possible and avoid any long losing streaks during the filming process. All they have to do is ask the Capitals to find out how brutal it can be to struggle on the ice—only to have the cameras around off the ice.

The second question surrounding the 24/7 series is much more interesting from an entertainment standpoint: who will be the breakout star? Last season Bruce Boudreau and his charming Haagen-Dazs eating ways endeared him to hockey fans all over North America. Or maybe it was his #$@*& language in the $#@#*&in’ locker room?

So who is the odds on favorite to replace Boudreau as the most entertaining hockey personality on HBO? Rangers forward Brandon Prust shares his thoughts on the important matter:

“We all have our No. 1 pick,” [Tortorella] He’ll definitely be No. 1. The man with the beard (coach John Tortorella), that will be interesting to see.”

Suddenly I have visions of John Tortorella and Larry Brooks dancing through my head. Forget the games, televising those two in postgame interviews could be more entertaining than following the 40 players on the ice. Then again, 24/7 promises to have the likes of Sean Avery, Chris Pronger, and Scott Hartnell mic’d up during games.

Either way, this should be good. And just as a reminder—as if Avery and Pronger aren’t enough, we could be treated to four weeks of the sheer genius of Ilya Bryzgalov.

Who are you looking forward seeing on 24/7 this season? Are you looking forward to the usual suspects we mentioned or is there another player who you think will steal the show? Let us know in the comments.

A big new contract won’t hurt Brooks Laich’s world-class work ethic

Brooks Laich, Chris Drury

Aside from Matt Hendricks’ astounding battle wound, it seemed like the Pittsburgh Penguins came across as the stars during the early parts of HBO’s 24/7 special, which only makes sense since the Washington Capitals were in the middle of one of their worst slumps in years during the beginning. Yet if there was one Washington player who pretty much always came across as a class act, it was hard working center Brooks Laich. (Then again, he already earned great press for helping a troubled motorist, so he’s probably just one of those people who radiate goodness.)

Perhaps the most critical remark you can utter about Laich is that the Capitals probably overpaid him this off-season by signing him to a six-year, $27 million deal. Laich brings plenty of likeable qualities to the table, but a $4.5 million annual cap hit is simply too much for a player at his level.

That being said, if you think that he’s going to rest on his laurels/get fat and happy from his big payday, On Frozen Blog features a story that dispels that notion with aplomb. Elisabeth Meinecke reports that while the Capitals’ off-season workout regime calls for roughly nine hours per week of effort, Laich averages about 24. Laich said that the turning point happened during the versatile center’s second season in the NHL.

Laich wasn’t always this way about his offseason training. In fact, he can pinpoint his obsession with conditioning—he phrases it as “messed up mentally that way”—back to the end of his second year in the NHL. He’d scored 7 and 8 goals in his first and second seasons, respectively. After that second year, he was walking into an ice arena back home when, Laich said, he realized, “I have to do something to separate myself from being a bubble player and try and realize the potential that I believe I have.”

From then on, instead of going into the gym at 9 am, he’d start at 7 am and stay till about 11 am. He’d make sure to be in bed by 9 pm, to the chagrin of friends. The season following that summer, however, Laich scored over 20 goals, and a conditioning junkie was born.

And, in quintessential Brooks Laich fashion, he enjoys it.

“I can’t wait to get to bed at night ‘cause I’m excited to get up …  I’m out of bed at 5:30 in the morning, ready to get to the gym, because I want to push it – I’m 28 years old, I should be entering the prime of my career.  I want to push it and see how good I can get,” Laich says. “Roddie and I sort of developed  a saying over the years, ‘It hurts you so long, you’ll be addicted to pain.’”

Really, the only downside I can see to this regime is that Laich might risk injuries by working too hard. That’s a great problem to have, though, and it’s honestly quite refreshing amid the series of entitlement-soaked stories we’ve been following this week. Maybe the Capitals are overpaying Laich a bit considering his skill level, but if his determination rubs off on teammates, it might be worth the investment.