Tag: 2011 Stanley Cup finals

APTOPIX Stanley Cup Vancouver Scene Hockey

Canucks discuss how they’ll help Vancouver deal with big events, learn from riots

Considering how tragic this summer has been for individuals in the hockey worldparticularly enforcers – some might forget that the season ended with an entire city getting a black eye. That ugly night of rioting in Vancouver was especially unfortunate considering the fact that the city dealt with similar issues 17 years earlier, when the Canucks also lost a Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals.

The hope is that even though history repeated itself in a way, the city, team (and even to some extent the NHL) will learn from those awful times. Winnipeg’s CTV took a look at two reviews of the June 15 riots – one was an independent review by retired law enforcement representatives, the other was an internal review by the city of Vancouver – to see how responsible the NHL and its teams should be for managing large crowds that gather for games in places that aren’t considered their designated buildings.

Various sides argued the cases for and against the league and its team taking a larger role in policing large crowds that aren’t at their buildings. Some (including Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson) believe that teams should work along side cities during major events while others believed that the Canucks and other teams would be out of their element.

“I’m very hopeful we see a positive response from the NHL and the Canucks in the event we are in this situation maybe next year,” Robertson said. “I’m hopeful we have a real pro-active role coming from the league and the Canucks so that we don’t see this kind of situation again.”

But business professor Richard Powers questioned why the league or Canucks have any responsibility for what happens outside the arena.

“The club and league, they provide a source of entertainment,” Powers, a professor of business law and ethics at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, said Friday.

“It’s sports. It’s not policing, it’s not crowd control. It’s not their expertise.”

The Canucks responded to the reviews by saying that they will encourage “responsible, fun celebrations” and that they hope to work with the city and province to help them out if they plan on arranging similar events in the future. Here are few excerpts from  Canucks COO Victor de Bonis, via the Vancouver Sun.

“Obviously, the first thing is that we’re committed to working with the city and province in the future to try to help and support them if they plan to do public-viewing parties of our games.”

De Bonis said he was uncertain what the level of support might be, whether it would involve funding for security and police, as well as education and awareness programs.

The latter initiatives, he noted, are a certainty.

“We’re really looking forward to trying to support the recommendations in the report and build programs that would drive success for these kinds of events in the future,” de Bonis said.

When asked about the possibility of shutting down those big, public events altogether – an extreme but understandable notion considering how hard it is to control crowds of “too many people” who get “too drunk” – de Bonis acknowledged that possibility but said that he hopes “it never gets to that.”

It’s great to hear that the Canucks are pledging heightened responsibility when it comes to helping the city deal with big events, although the details seem a bit vague right now. It would be a shame if the sports world needs to cringe every time the Canucks reach such a high level because of worries about riots, especially since Vancouver as a whole responded admirably to that ugly situation.

Click here for a gallery of the riot and some information about the arrests. Hopefully those sights will remain rare for Vancouver and other NHL markets.

Comparing PHT editor and reader predictions in the 2011 playoffs

Adam McQuaid; Raffi Torres
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Over the long haul, we all did pretty well with our predictions for the 2011 playoffs. There wasn’t a Cinderella team anywhere near the shocking level of the 2009 Montreal Canadiens or 2006 Edmonton Oilers to make everyone look silly. Instead, this year’s playoffs were like a class everyone did pretty well in all along … until final exams handed us C’s and F’s (except for one handsome/beautiful group of students). Hopefully that final test doesn’t wreck our overall grades, though.

Let’s take a look at how everyone did in the 2011 Stanley Cup finals and the 2011 playoffs overall.

2011 Stanley Cup finals

Boston Bruins (third seed in the East) vs. Vancouver Canucks (first seed in West)

Actual result: Bruins beat the Canucks 4-3
PHT readers pick: Bruins beat the Canucks 4-3 (22.83 percent)
Joe’s pick: Canucks beat the Bruins 4-2
Matt’s pick: Canucks beat the Bruins 4-2
James’ pick: Canucks beat the Bruins 4-1

First round records:

PHT readers: 5-3 (with two exactly correct)
Joe: 6-2 (with three exactly correct)
James: 8-0 (with two exactly correct)

Second round records

PHT readers: 1-3 (with one exactly correct)
Joe: 1-3 (with one exactly correct)
James: 2-2 (with none exactly correct)

Third round records

PHT readers: 1-1 (zero exactly correct)
Joe: 2-0 (with one exactly correct)
James: 2-0 (with none exactly correct)

Final round records

PHT readers: 1-0 (one exactly correct)
Joe: 0-1
Matt: 0-1
James: 0-1

Overall record

PHT readers: 8-7 (with four exactly correct)
Joe: 9-6 (with five exactly correct)
James: 12-3 (with two exactly correct)
Matt: 6-3 (with three exactly correct)

Game 7 of 2011 Stanley Cup finals ties best Game 7 overnight ratings on record

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

With the NBA finals far enough in the sporting world’s rear view mirror, the NHL gained the opportunity to be the center of attention in Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday. That powerful position – plus the undeniable drawing impact of a huge, historic hockey market like Boston and its surrounding areas – made for some impressive ratings for NBC and the NHL.

The Boston Bruins 4-0 win drew a 5.7 overnight rating and 10 share, which ties the overnight ratings earned by a SCF Game 7 since the 2003 Stanley Cup finals between the Anaheim (Mighty?) Ducks and the New Jersey Devils. That also represents a 14 percent increase from the most recent Game 7 in the Stanley Cup finals, which took place between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Detroit Red Wings in 2009.

Yup, that means Tim Thomas & Co. beat Sidney Crosby, Nicklas Lidstrom and a bevvy of other stars from that series just two years ago.

The game earned the second-best overnight rating for a Stanley Cup finals game in the last 36 years, behind only Game 6 in last year’s series between the Chicago Blackhawks and Philadelphia Flyers, which drew a 5.8 overnight rating and 10 share (one can only imagine the ratings that would have been generated for a Game 7 between those two teams). It was also the highest overnight rating for a Stanley Cup final game involving a Canadian team in 38 years.

The ratings were especially mind-blowing in Boston:

BOSTON SETS RECORDS: The Boston market earned a 43.4 rating and a 64 share, the best overnight on record for a hockey game in Boston (dating back to 1991) and the best overnight in the Boston market featuring a Boston team in any major sports championship since Super Bowl XLII (Patriots-Giants, 55.6 on 2/3/08).

Boston’s seven-game average for the Stanley Cup Final (five games on NBC, two games on VERSUS) was a 28.1/44, 12 percent higher than ABC’s seven-game Boston average for last year’s NBA Finals (25.0/40 for Boston-LA Lakers).

Here is a list of the six best Stanley Cup final Game 7 ratings since 1995:

T1. 6/15/11, Boston-Vancouver, 5.7/10 – Last Night’s Game
T1. 6/9/03, Anaheim-New Jersey, 5.7/9
3. 6/9/01, New Jersey-Colorado, 5.5/11
4. 6/7/04, Calgary-Tampa Bay, 5.3/8
5. 6/12/09, Pittsburgh-Detroit, 5.0/10
6. 6/19/06, Edmonton-Carolina, 4.1/7

Finally, here are the top 10 U.S. markets for the game:

1. Boston, 43.4/64
2. Providence, 25.9/38
3. Buffalo, 10.6/17
T4. Detroit, 8.7/14
T4. Hartford, 8.7/13
6. Pittsburgh, 7.6/12
7. Denver, 7.2/14
T8. Minneapolis, 6.7/12
T8. Las Vegas, 6.7/11
10. St. Louis, 6.2/10

Perhaps there might have been a “novelty factor” to the Bruins winning their first Stanley Cup in 39 years, but something tells me that the NHL wouldn’t be too offended if Boston makes another trip to the championship round. (You can vote on that possibility in this poll, by the way.)