Tag: 2011 Stanley Cup finals

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

Game 7 of 2011 Stanley Cup finals ties best Game 7 overnight ratings on record


With the NBA finals far enough in the sporting world’s rear view mirror, the NHL gained the opportunity to be the center of attention in Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday. That powerful position – plus the undeniable drawing impact of a huge, historic hockey market like Boston and its surrounding areas – made for some impressive ratings for NBC and the NHL.

The Boston Bruins 4-0 win drew a 5.7 overnight rating and 10 share, which ties the overnight ratings earned by a SCF Game 7 since the 2003 Stanley Cup finals between the Anaheim (Mighty?) Ducks and the New Jersey Devils. That also represents a 14 percent increase from the most recent Game 7 in the Stanley Cup finals, which took place between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Detroit Red Wings in 2009.

Yup, that means Tim Thomas & Co. beat Sidney Crosby, Nicklas Lidstrom and a bevvy of other stars from that series just two years ago.

The game earned the second-best overnight rating for a Stanley Cup finals game in the last 36 years, behind only Game 6 in last year’s series between the Chicago Blackhawks and Philadelphia Flyers, which drew a 5.8 overnight rating and 10 share (one can only imagine the ratings that would have been generated for a Game 7 between those two teams). It was also the highest overnight rating for a Stanley Cup final game involving a Canadian team in 38 years.

The ratings were especially mind-blowing in Boston:

BOSTON SETS RECORDS: The Boston market earned a 43.4 rating and a 64 share, the best overnight on record for a hockey game in Boston (dating back to 1991) and the best overnight in the Boston market featuring a Boston team in any major sports championship since Super Bowl XLII (Patriots-Giants, 55.6 on 2/3/08).

Boston’s seven-game average for the Stanley Cup Final (five games on NBC, two games on VERSUS) was a 28.1/44, 12 percent higher than ABC’s seven-game Boston average for last year’s NBA Finals (25.0/40 for Boston-LA Lakers).

Here is a list of the six best Stanley Cup final Game 7 ratings since 1995:

T1. 6/15/11, Boston-Vancouver, 5.7/10 – Last Night’s Game
T1. 6/9/03, Anaheim-New Jersey, 5.7/9
3. 6/9/01, New Jersey-Colorado, 5.5/11
4. 6/7/04, Calgary-Tampa Bay, 5.3/8
5. 6/12/09, Pittsburgh-Detroit, 5.0/10
6. 6/19/06, Edmonton-Carolina, 4.1/7

Finally, here are the top 10 U.S. markets for the game:

1. Boston, 43.4/64
2. Providence, 25.9/38
3. Buffalo, 10.6/17
T4. Detroit, 8.7/14
T4. Hartford, 8.7/13
6. Pittsburgh, 7.6/12
7. Denver, 7.2/14
T8. Minneapolis, 6.7/12
T8. Las Vegas, 6.7/11
10. St. Louis, 6.2/10

Perhaps there might have been a “novelty factor” to the Bruins winning their first Stanley Cup in 39 years, but something tells me that the NHL wouldn’t be too offended if Boston makes another trip to the championship round. (You can vote on that possibility in this poll, by the way.)

Roberto Luongo: ‘We’re devastated … but we’ll be back’

Roberto Luongo

When you look at things from the perspective of a substantial chunk of hockey fans, Roberto Luongo is a failure. They forget how strong he was in Game 7 against the Chicago Blackhawks, remembering the trouble that came before that triumph. Their memories gloss over some great performances against the Nashville Predators and San Jose Sharks while likely deleting Luongo’s two shutouts and three home wins in the Stanley Cup finals, fast-forwarding straight to his four (often ugly) losses.

To them, Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals told the whole story about Roberto Luongo.

Yet if you try to get inside of the man in Vancouver’s net, the perspective changes substantially. He came into the league with some high expectations – and according to some metrics – he’s backed up his high draft status with big league results. After being traded from the New York Islanders and toiling away with the Florida Panthers, Luongo might tell you he’s made good on the hype that followed him around once he became the Vancouver Canucks go-to goalie. (He also has that gold medal from the 2010 Olympics to soothe his soul, by the way.)

There are plenty of Canucks fans who will call for Luongo’s head (and probably the matching noggins of the Sedin twins as well) after that 4-0 embarrassment, but his expensive contract will make a trade very unlikely. Despite that brutal loss, Luongo seemed resolute when talking about the team’s future while his teammates came to his defense.

“We’re devastated, but we’re a good team and we’ll be back,” said the dejected Luongo, his voice breaking slightly as he fought back tears.


“As a team if we all could have stepped up a notch, starting with myself, we could have got the job done,” Luongo said. “We’re devastated as a team. We worked all year to get to this point and to fall short like that is a tough one to take. It’s a team game, we’re not going to point fingers at one individual.”

Luongo certainly doesn’t shoulder all the blame.

Canucks captain Henrik Sedin had one point in the Cup finals, twin brother Daniel had four, and the winners of the last two scoring titles were on the ice for all four goals in Game 7. Both came quickly to Luongo’s defense.

“We scored zero goals today,” Daniel Sedin said. “So if you want to blame guys, blame all the guys, or blame us, it’s not all up to him.”

Expect more discussion of the Canucks’ future today and as the beginning of free agency approaches on July 1. Whether Canucks fans like it or not, Luongo will almost certainly be part of that discussion for several years to come.

Poll: Can the Boston Bruins repeat as Stanley Cup champions in 2012?

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

While the Boston Bruins were far from some ragtag eighth seed going into the 2011 Stanley Cup finals, few people outside of the Massachusetts area expected them to beat the mighty Vancouver Canucks. It wasn’t really about the Bruins, either; most people gave Boston a reasonable amount of respect as they chose the Canucks based on their sterling regular season and improving play as the postseason went along.

Those expectations went out the window beginning in Game 3 at TD Banknorth Garden in Boston, though. The Bruins played the Canucks tough in the two opening games of the series, but they showed that they more than belonged on the same ice sheet once the games shifted to their home. They used top notch defense from Zdeno Chara, historically great goaltending from Tim Thomas and an underrated (and diverse) offensive attack to dominate Vancouver 23-8 overall in the series while winning in Game 7.

Of course, after seeing the Chicago Blackhawks need a Dallas Stars defeat on the last game of the season to even get into the playoffs after dominating on their way to last year’s Cup, many wonder what’s in store for the Bruins. While it is impossible to predict how much of an impact aging (and having a new bulls-eye on their backs as defending champions) will have on the team, an earlier study of their off-season questions shows that Boston is in a good position for next season.

Here is an updated version of those thoughts:

Boston will just try to make some tweaks

The Bruins roster probably won’t see too many huge changes. That’s not to say they lack a tough choice or two, though. Let’s take a look at their biggest free agent questions, keeping in mind that the Bruins will likely have about $8.3-$11.3 million to work with this summer.

Note: money amount refers to what they made in the 2010-11 season while their free agent status (restricted or unrestricted) is also listed.

Brad Marchand ($821K, restricted) – The agitating rookie was strong in the regular season (18 goals, 41 points) and nearly essential in the playoffs (19 points in 25 postseason games) as he lead all rookies in points. Despite Tyler Seguin‘s explosive two-game burst, Marchand has still been the best rookie in Boston. He scored seven points in the seven-game Stanley Cup finals, most notably two goals and one assist in a Game 7 that won’t be forgotten anytime soon … and certainly not at the negotiating table.

Michael Ryder ($4 million, unrestricted) – Ryder’s offensive production hasn’t always been reliable, but when he’s hot, he’s a dangerous forward. He produced two nice playoff runs (17 points in 2011, 13 in 08-09) that should really improve his value. That 17-point output ranked him fifth on the team. The Bruins face a much tougher call about Ryder than many thought going into the postseason, for sure.

Tomas Kaberle ($4.25 million, unrestricted) – Not only is Kaberle an unlikely returnee, he probably damaged his free agent value substantially in his belly flop in Boston.

Since we last checked, Marchand went from “in line for a nice raise” to “primed for a really nice raise.” While he can walk the line of agitation and self-destruction, the Bruins probably won’t hesitate to open up their wallets for him. Ryder has a great shot too while Kaberle is, again, a goner.

Kaberle was supposed to plug perhaps the Bruins’ biggest hole: a power play QB on defense. Boston might have the cap space to go after an unrestricted free agent, although the market for scoring defensemen is pretty weak. Claude Julien might not be crazy with error-prone journeyman James Wisniewski and the team might not have been blown away by free agent Canucks such as Christian Ehrhoff, Sami Salo and Kevin Bieksa, either.

Conclusions (plus the poll)

The most important thing is that the Bruins’ big guns are locked up. Thomas has two years left on his deal, Chara will likely retire by the time his contract expires and the team’s useful forwards have at least one more year left. Let’s not forget that Seguin could also take off in his sophomore season either with a giant step forward (like Steven Stamkos) or perhaps in a more incremental way (like John Tavares).

Since they aren’t likely to suffer many major losses in personnel, the biggest question becomes very simple: do you think they’re good enough to win it all next year? Let us know if you think the Bruins will repeat as champions next year by voting in the poll below.

Video: Star Cam and Net Cam footage from Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

(Check out an in-depth recap of the Boston Bruins’ 4-0 win against the Vancouver Canucks in Game 7 here. You can read about Tim Thomas’ Conn Smythe Trophy victory, Mark Recchi’s retirement announcement and the Bruins’ celebration of the Cup win in the corresponding posts.)

Believe it or not, the Canucks actually brought a reasonable effort to the table in tonight’s defeat. They fired 37 shots at Thomas and created a nice amount of scoring chances.

Unfortunately for Vancouver fans (who haven’t exactly taken the loss very well, sadly), the Bruins’ stars came through while theirs couldn’t get it done. Over time, people will probably forget the near-scores by the Canucks and focus on the brilliant run by Thomas and a fantastic game by Brad Marchand and Patrice Bergeron.

Check out NBC’s Star Cam footage from Game 7.

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Enjoy some of the best work from the goalies in this Net Cam montage.

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Mark Recchi announces his retirement after getting his wish: one last Stanley Cup win

Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Seven

There aren’t many professional athletes who can look back at the final game of their playing careers with the same amount of positivity as Mark Recchi will. The Boston Bruins forward confirmed the expectations of many by announcing his retirement shortly after his team won the Stanley Cup in Game 7.

He didn’t win the Cup as some lucky bystander, either; he scored seven points in the Stanley Cup finals series and 14 points in 25 playoff games overall. He earned an assist and an impressive +3 rating in Game 7 while skating alongside Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand.

Every player has his regrets, but Recchi enjoyed an outstanding 22-year career in the NHL. He won three Stanley Cups: one in his first playoff run in 1991 with the Pittsburgh Penguins, one after being traded to the Carolina Hurricanes in 2006 and this triumph with Boston. Recchi will finish his distinguished career with 1,533 points in 1,652 regular season games and 147 points in 189 career playoff contests.

Are those the numbers of a Hall of Fame player? Almost 86 percent of PHT readers think so, according to this poll.

(click to enlarge)

Whether he makes the Hockey Hall of Fame or not (I would bet that he does), Recchi produced a fantastic career. That’s something he can reflect on in retirement, though. Tonight, he’s simply going to spend one more night doing what’s likely one of his favorite things: celebrating a big win with his teammates.