Tag: 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame inductions

2011 Hockey Hall Of Fame Induction

Mark Howe’s fitting tribute to his father Gordie

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Mark Howe lived in the shadow of his famous father Gordie … until he turned out to be an excellent professional in his own right. His inclusion in the Hockey Hall of Fame should make that perfectly clear.

That doesn’t mean Mark didn’t appreciate the hockey legend’s presence in his life and he made that clear in his speech, as he donned Gordie’s iconic Detroit Red Wings number nine jersey. (View his full speech here.)

That was arguably the most memorable moment of the night, but you might want to check out the other three inductees’ speeches. Here they are, in alphabetical order:

Ed Belfour:

Doug Gilmour:

Joe Nieuwendyk:

2011 Hockey Hall of Famers try on their rings

2011 Hockey Hall Of Fame Induction
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Ed Belfour, Doug Gilmour, Mark Howe and Joe Nieuwendyk joined the greatest players of all-time in the Hockey Hall of Fame this afternoon. Check out video of their ring ceremony, which includes some interesting reflections from all four inductees – plus Mark’s famous dad. (My pick for the most interesting bit: Nieuwendyk’s true love was lacrosse. Hockey history would be a little different if he didn’t opt for the NHL, eh?)

Ed Belfour, Doug Gilmour, Mark Howe and Joe Nieuwendyk are 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees


The 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees have been announced. Keep in mind a few things before perusing this year’s additions.

An inductee must be on 75 percent of the voters’ ballots to be inducted. A maximum of four male players and two female players can be inducted while any combination of two builders/referees/executives can be inducted each year. The induction ceremony will take place on November 19.

The 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees (all players, no builders): Ed Belfour, Doug Gilmour, Mark Howe and Joe Nieuwendyk.

Belfour, Gilmour and Nieuwendyk were probably the most obvious inclusions while Howe’s induction has been a long time coming. While last year’s Hall of Fame class was full of surprises, this year’s edition is much more predictable (even if many will complain about the choices anyway). One can see the consensus from those picks by looking at Belfour, Gilmour and Nieuwendyk’s domination of our own informal poll of PHT staff, media experts and hockey bloggers.

Adam Oates was the only player in the top four of our poll who didn’t make it this afternoon (somewhere PHT’s own Joe Yerdon might be stewing). We’ll provide the requisite sounding board for snub talk later on, but let’s take a quick snapshot of these players’ careers first.

Ed Belfour – “Eddie the Eagle” wasn’t even drafted into the NHL, yet he ended up being a first-ballot Hall of Famer. His numbers are impeccable: one Stanley Cup, two Vezina Trophies, 484 regular season wins (third all-time) and 88 more in the playoffs. Belfour was one of the best goalies of his generation, making him a worthy addition to the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Doug Gilmour – While Belfour wasn’t even drafted, Gilmour languished until the seventh round of the 1982 NHL Entry Draft. He went on to notch almost a point per game by scoring an outstanding 1,414 points in 1,474 regular season games, but his playoff production was even more impressive. Gilmour is tied with Joe Sakic for seventh all-time in postseason scoring with a staggering 188 playoff points in 182 games. He probably would have made it into the HHOF based on his scoring prowess alone, but Gilmour also earned rave reviews for his “intangibles” and was a well-rounded player, earning the 1992-93 Selke Trophy.

Mark Howe – While the other three nominees didn’t wait long to make it to the Hall of Fame, Howe probably wondered if his day would ever come; his first year of eligibility was 1998. The wait is over for Mark to join his famous father Gordie in the Hall, though. The blueliner was a Norris Trophy runner-up three times (according to TSN) and put up some great offensive numbers for a defenseman. Howe scored 742 points in 929 regular season games and 61 in 101 postseason games in his NHL career. He also was prolific in the WHA, scoring 504 points in 426 regular season games and 92 points in 75 playoff games in that wild and woolly league.

Joe Nieuwendyk – Nieuwendyk put up some great individual numbers (1,126 points in 1,257 regular season games; 116 in 158 playoff games), but his team-based successes and “intangibles” were what helped him get into the Hall of Fame. He won three Stanley Cups: one with Calgary, one with Dallas and one with New Jersey. Nieuwendyk won the 1988-89 Conn Smythe Trophy after leading the Flames to that precious championship victory and showed the kind of intelligence and winning attitude that helped him ascend to the level of Dallas Stars general manager in little time.


Again, there will be some serious debate about who should and should not have been inducted into this year’s Hall of Fame. That being said, the hockey world should take a step back for a moment and give these four players their well-earned praise. They stand shoulder-to-shoulder with some of the greatest hockey players of all-time after today’s announcements.

Belfour, Nieuwendyk, Gilmour and Oates generate most votes in 2011 PHT Hall of Fame voting


There were plenty of interesting names (including a few outliers, such as Hakan Loob, Mike Vernon and Rogie Vachon) who received would-be votes in PHT’s 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame polls, but four players stood above the rest. Goalie Ed Belfour and forwards Joe Nieuwendyk, Doug Gilmour and Adam Oates received the most votes among PHT staffers, hockey bloggers and media experts.

Naturally, our votes won’t count toward the actual 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees, but it’s still an interesting experiment in public opinion. Here are the voting results. (Four finalists in bold.)

Ed Belfour – 9 votes
Joe Nieuwendyk – 8 votes
Doug Gilmour – 7 votes
Adam Oates – 6 votes
Pat Burns, Phil Housley, Boris Mikhailov, Pavel Bure and Dave Andreychuk – 3 votes
Eric Lindros, Sergei Makarov, Rick Middleton and Alex Mogilny – 2 votes
Hakan Loob, Mike Vernon, Rogie Vachon, Fred Shero, Pat Verbeek – 1 vote

As you can see, the top four achieved something close to consensus while there were some interesting “fringe” candidates at the bottom of the order. If you’re wondering who will actually be inducted this afternoon, stick with PHT for that update.

The PHT staff reveals their 2011 Hockey Hall of Fame choices

Joe Nieuwendyk

No one at Pro Hockey Talk has been given the honor of voting for the Hockey Hall of Fame, but with the induction announcements set for this afternoon, we decided to share the four choices we would make if we had that power. Feel free to share your own in the comments.

You can also find out who experts such as Mike Milbury and Keith Jones would pick by clicking here.

Joe Yerdon’s picks

1. Joe Nieuwendyk

2. Dave Andreychuk

3. Adam Oates

4. Doug Gilmour

With the load of sure-thing first ballot type Hall of Famers due to arrive in the coming years, this is the best chance for those who should be in the Hall of Fame to get their shot at making it in now. These four players should already be in the Hall of Fame and thanks to the foolish stipulations for how the vote has to go and the limits on the number of inductees, we’re looking at a log jam. Every one of these four have no-brainer accolades.

Joe Nieuwendyk was the perfect all-around player on numerous Stanley Cup winners. Dave Andreychuk scored 640 goals and led the Tampa Bay Lightning to a Cup. Adam Oates is the highest scoring player not in the Hall of Fame (16th all-time) and is sixth all time in assists. Doug Gilmour was a tenacious two-way player, a clutch playoff performer, and the second highest scoring player not in the Hall (17th all-time). You could nit-pick and argue about any of these guys, but they’re Hall of Famers each and every one. It’s not about arguing one guy against another as far as my ballot’s concerned, for these four it’s about getting those in who are well overdue.

James O’Brien’s picks

1. Ed Belfour – Eddie the Eagle was one of the best goalies of his generation. Belfour won two Vezina Trophies, one Stanley Cup and sits at third place all-time in wins. He also earned my personal award of “most regrettable use of a FUBU jersey.”

2. Eric Lindros – I generally value high-level impact more than impressive consistency. This isn’t the Hall of Longevity or Friendliness after all; it’s the Hall of Fame. Injuries derailed Lindros’ career but his individual numbers compare favorably to Peter Forsberg’s and he made a, well, Lindros-sized impact on the game. Put him in the “Jerks” section if you must, but he deserves to be in there.

3. Pavel BureMy old comparison still holds: Bure was the Dominique Wilkins of hockey, a human highlight reel on skates. Bure is sixth all time in goals scored per game (.62) and averaged more than a point per game but those numbers don’t do the dazzling Russian justice. Just watch his highlights.

4. Doug Gilmour – Gilmour’s 1,414 regular season points will attract a lot of voters, but I’m most impressed by his 188 points in 182 career playoff games, tying him for seventh all-time with Joe Sakic. Gilmour was also strong defensively, winning the 1992-93 Selke.

Honorable mentions: Boris Mikhailov, Sergei Makarov, Adam Oates and Joe Nieuwendyk.

Matt Reitz’s picks

1. Ed Belfour – In an era when NHL teams had to have great goaltending to be successful, he was one of the best.  He led his team to the Stanley Cup in 1999 and made it to the Finals on two other occasions.  He’s 3rd all-time in wins (484) and 9th all-time in shutouts (76).

2. Joe Nieuwendyk – The points are nice, but he was both a winner AND a leader just about everywhere he went.  He ended his career with 564 goals, a Conn Smyth Trophy, and three Stanley Cups.  The better question: Why didn’t he make it on his first ballot?

3. Adam Oates – One of the best passers in the history of the game.  Everyone assumes that Brett Hull made him look good, but I have a feeling that Hull benefited a bit from having those one-timers set on a tee from Oates.

4. Rogie Vachon – One of the best goaltenders in the 1970s, Vachon won three Cups and a Vezina with the Habs.  He’s the best goaltender in the history of the NHL who is NOT in the Hall.

Honorary mention – Doug Gilmour:  He was a gritty two-way guy who every coach would have killed for, he was a GREAT leader on the ice, AND he put up HoF type numbers.  Is there a good case AGAINST Gilmour?