Tag: 2010 free agency

Dallas Stars v Chicago Blackhawks

No news is good news? Dallas Stars decide to keep Brad Richards

After all that conjecture, Brad Richards will remain a member of the Dallas Stars. Well, he’ll be part of the team during the rest of the 2010-11 season, at least.

Obviously, this non-move unleashes a host of questions from both long-term and short-term perspectives. Will Richards be able to return from his concussion issues to help the Stars make sure they make the playoffs? Can the team make a legitimate playoff run and find a new owner to entice him to stay? Or will he bolt for New York, Toronto or some other sexy location?

While many have been negative regarding the lack of a trade, there are two things that must be noted. One is fairly obvious: it’s not outrageous to suggest that the Stars might be able to figure things out by July and retain Richards. If not, there’s one possibility that people overlook: what if the Stars did a sign-and-trade deal? Sure, they probably wouldn’t get the same kind of haul that they would during the deadline, but that option would allow the team to make a crucial playoff run to draw back fans and then get at least something back. After all, a team like the Rangers or Maple Leafs might pay a moderate premium to avoid an auction for Richards.

In an ideal world, the Stars would find new owners and Richards would play without a concussive fog, leaving everyone in a position of strength going into the summer. Reality is likely to complicate matters, so we’ll be there to highlight the bumps in the road and the silver linings alike.

Alex Tanguay, Clarke MacArthur rank among biggest steals from the 2010 free agent crop so far

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After Evgeni Nabokov left for the big bucks in the KHL and potential big-ticket players such as Patrick Marleau re-signed before July 1, last summer’s free agent group seemed like it would begin and end with the Ilya Kovalchuk sweepstakes. Sure, there were some impact defenseman here and there such as Sergei Gonchar and Dan Hamhuis, but for the most part it looked like the season of Kovalchuk.

Of course, you’re probably aware that the Kovalchuk investment has gone more than a little sour. He’s been a bust from an individual standpoint (only 5 goals and 11 points in 26 games with a pitiful -17 rating) while the New Jersey Devils are experiencing a nightmare season as the second worst team in the NHL.

As sports fans, we dream of our teams making splashy signings to reach a whole other level. The fact of the matter is, though, that big free agent acquisitions tend to flame out more often than they succeed. Maybe it’s the change of environment or the increased pressure that comes with those gigantic paychecks, but free agency is just a another type of personnel gambling along with similarly unstable endeavors such as making trades and drafting.

So when we look back to see which teams made the shrewdest moves, it turns out that under-the-radar signings yielded some of the best results. TSN’s Jamie Bell discusses some of the best deals in free agency, which all seem to the similar trait of being less ballyhooed moves. I thought I’d focus on a few of those moves here in this post.

Alex Tanguay

Contract: one-year, $1.7 million cap hit

While Jokinen has just two goals in 25 games so far at the steep price of $3 million per season, Tanguay has been the Flames most consistent forward thus far with 23 points in 28 games, trailing only Jarome Iginla for the team lead. What makes the production all the more valuable is that it comes at the $1.7 million price tag attached to him this year.  Compared to the $6.9 million that the San Jose Sharks are paying Patrick Marleau (a player they paid a premium for before the free agent market opened) to post similar numbers (22 points in 26 games) it appears that the Flames got themselves quite the steal.

Our take: Honestly, I thought the Tampa Bay Lightning would reap big rewards for signing Tanguay to a bargain deal for the 2009-10 season. Instead, such a result took an extra season to come to fruition as the playmaking forward is doing well during his second run with the Calgary Flames.

Clarke MacArthur

Contract: one-year, $1.1 million cap hit.

After sending a third and fourth round draft to the Buffalo Sabres at the trade deadline to acquire Clarke MacArthur, the Atlanta Thrashers decided that $2.4 million was too high a price to pay to retain him. They chose to walk away from an arbitrator’s decision on his salary, making him an unrestricted free agent. Burke happily swooped in and signed the Alberta native to a one-year, $1.1 million contract and has been reaping the rewards ever since.

Heading in to action Wednesday night, MacArthur leads the Maple Leafs in scoring with 21 points in 26 games and is second only to Kessel in goals. He’s been the club’s most consistent forward so far and has injected a nice mixture of skill and grit playing alongside the likes of Nikolai Kulemin and Mikhail Grabovski.

Our take: While Tanguay’s nice season has been better than expected yet reasonably foreseeable, I didn’t see MacArthur’s resurgence coming. It seems like his offense has been coming in uneven patches, but at $1.1 million, you cannot complain with 21 points in 26 games.

Other mentions: Manny Malhotra and Raffi Torres by the Vancouver Canucks, Colby Armstrong with the Maple Leafs and the Buffalo Sabres’ signing of Jordan Leopold.

Our take: Malhotra’s price tag ($2.5 million) seems a bit steep for a faceoff specialist, although he is bringing a little offense and some solid D to Vancouver. Torres was a big bust in Buffalo but has sporadically sparked the Canucks’ scoring. Armstrong is also a bit pricey ($3 million) but sometimes helps Toronto win games in ways that don’t always show up on the box score.

At least at this point in the season, the big names aren’t producing big results while subtle moves are providing great value. Maybe it’s depressing to consider the fact that the splashy moves can be big mistakes, but it also gives you reason to believe.

Next summer we might just ask this question without a trace of sarcasm: who’s going to sign the next … Clarke MacArthur?

Tales of what could have been: Ilya Kovalchuk plays in Los Angeles… Against the Kings


The 2010 summer of free agency wasn’t very kind to the Los Angeles Kings. The Kings were poised to become the next team to make a big run and were viewed to be one major acquisition away from becoming a favorite for the Stanley Cup in 2011. The Kings and their general manager Dean Lombardi were one of the major pursuers for Ilya Kovalchuk over the summer, along with the New Jersey Devils, and ultimately came up well short of their goal of landing the superstar forward.

Being out of the salary range of the Kings has left many Kings fans upset that Kovalchuk turned them down to stay in New Jersey. Rudy Kelly of SBNation-Los Angeles is here to say to Kings fans, “Leave Ilya alone.”

I know we were all disappointed when Kovalchuk did sign with New Jersey, but some folks have gone overboard. Some folks are white-knuckled with rage, denouncing Kovalchuk from rooftops while languishing in the Devils’ recent misfortune. Some are even planning on booing Ilya Kovalchuk in tonight’s game. Friends, that is the wrong tack to take. Booing Kovalchuk would only reinforce in Kovalchuk’s mind all the reasons he chose not to come to Los Angeles and the fans themselves would only be eating sour grapes. It would be tactless and only poison the atmosphere of the game.

Yes, the deal Kovalchuk signed in New Jersey did end up violating the CBA and he was forced to sign a new one. Yes, Kovalchuk’s team may be in last place and yes, Kovalchuk may have been benched recently for missing a team meeting. These are all bad things and in retrospect Kovalchuk may have made a poor decision. But that only serves to prove that Kovalchuk is human. If you cut him, does he not bleed? If you score on him, does he not curse? If you take the puck into his zone, does he not backcheck? …Wait, he doesn’t do that one. He does the other ones though.

All right, so Rudy’s having a little bit of fun here with everything and how can you not? The Devils are off to a brutal start to the season while the Kings have started off things in a big way without Kovalchuk leading the way. Instead, the Kings’ own off-season acquisitions are filling in admirably in defenseman Willie Mitchell and forward Alexei Ponikarovsky. If we were to judge how a team’s off-season went after less than ten games we’d be both stupid and saying that the Kings came away the big winners over the Devils.

Instead, we’ll see how things play out at the end of the year to see if the Kings and Devils were able to improve themselves upon how they each finished last season. For both teams, that means making it past the first round of the playoffs. Whether or not Kovalchuk can do that for New Jersey and if the Kings more team-centric model can propel them to greatness.