Tag: 1000 points

Ray Whitney Getty

Ray Whitney scores 1,000th point in Coyotes win

Teemu Selanne gets plenty of well-deserved attention for putting up great numbers at an advanced age, but Ray Whitney is producing some of the best stats of his career at 39. In fact, he scored a goal and an assist tonight to help the Phoenix Coyotes earn a 4-0 win against the Anaheim Ducks – and cross the 1,000-point barrier in the process.

Actually, Whitney’s at 1,001 points now – and 75 on the season. That’s just eight points shy of his career-high of 83, set with the Carolina Hurricanes in 2006-07.

Tonight wasn’t just big for Whitney, though. The Coyotes’ victory leaves them at 91 standings points, essentially tied with the Los Angeles Kings for the Pacific Division lead.

Mike Smith is also doing quite well for himself, as he’s put together back-to-back shutouts, stopping all 82 shots in the last two games. That marks his seventh goose egg of 2011-12, another sign that his season a huge success.

The Coyotes aren’t assured a playoff spot just yet, but they certainly placed themselves in a better situation while they eagerly await what happens in the Dallas Stars-San Jose Sharks game tonight. Yet whether they succeed or fail in making the postseason, it’s been a great year for Smith – and a great career for “The Wizard.”

Jumbo Joe Thornton scores 1000th NHL point in Phoenix

Joe Thornton, Ilya Bryzgalov

Amidst teams all over the NHL battling for playoff spots on Friday night, the San Jose Sharks watched their captain earn an individual accolade that has been thirteen and a half years in the making. Joe Thornton became the 78th player in NHL history to reach the elusive 1000 point mark in a career—and only the second to do so in a San Jose Sharks jersey (Vincent Damphousse). Ironically, the man known as one of the best playmakers of his generation netted his 306 career goal for the milestone point.  Surely a perfectly set up saucer pass would have been far too predictable.

After the game, it was obvious Thornton would have preferred the victory over an individual accolade. After prodding, Joe Thornton had this to say after the game about scoring his 1000th point:

“You have to be blessed with a good supporting cast and luckily I’ve been blessed with a lot of good friends and family and good linemates and good players to play along. There are so many different variables that go into getting that many points.”


The former #1 overall pick from 1997 is in the middle of a few impressive milestones. Earlier this year, he passed teammate Patrick Marleau for the San Jose franchise record for most assists. On February 22, Jumbo Joe scored his 300th career goal. Unless he has 6 assists against the Coyotes in the season finale, Thornton will celebrate his 700th career assist early next season as well.

In 79 games this season, Thornton has posted 69 points (21 goals, 48 assists). Just as a measure of perspective, his point total is good for 24th in the NHL in scoring. Even more impressive is that these numbers represent an off-year for the #1 pivot. He managed to score his 1000th point in his 994 game—for math majors out there, that’s better than a point per game for the 14 year veteran. In fact, he currently ranks ninth in points and sixth in assists among active players.

For fans that missed it, here’s what the history making goal looked like:

With the numbers that Thornton has been able to put up in his career, it’ll be interesting to see how pundits look at his career when it’s all said and done. If he can stay healthy and continue to produce at this pace for another few years (he’s still only 31 years old), he’s going to be getting up into the elite players of all time. In just three more years at a similar pace, his statistics will be mentioned with Jean Beliveau, Bobby Hull, and Bobby Clarke. Of course, it’ll be a lot easier for hockey fans and historians to put him in the same conversation as those greats if he can help the Sharks win a Stanley Cup in the next few years as well.

Regardless of team success, it’s time to start talking seriously about the statistics Thornton has compiled over his career. A couple more years of this and we won’t be talking about a Hall of Famer; we’ll be talking about a first ballot Hall of Famer.

Now that Alex Kovalev hit 1,000 points, which European NHLer could be next?


Alex Kovalev is many things – talented, enigmatic and inconsistent are some of the most common descriptions for the winger – but one thing that is undeniable is the fact that he’s one of the all-time leading scorers among European-born NHL players.

He solidified that status on Monday by hitting the 1,000 point mark for his career. Oddly enough, he wasn’t the first Ottawa Senators forward to do it this season as Daniel Alfredsson reached that plateau earlier in 2010-11.

Naturally, with Kovalev hitting such an outstanding milestone, it had people wondering: who’s next? NHL.com specifically asked which European player – born and trained outside of Canada – might be the next one to do so? I thought I’d look at some of the most likely candidates and one pair who could be the most interesting case.

Marian Hossa, Chicago
Age: 31
Points: 787 in 850 games

At his current pace, Hossa would need to play another 225 games to reach 1,000 points, meaning he could get the milestone some time early in the 2013-14 season. But injuries could be a problem. Besides missing time earlier this season, he played just 57 games (51 points) last season while recovering from offseason shoulder surgery. Still, he has to be considered the favorite because he has a big lead over other European stars.

My take: With only 213 points to go, I think Hossa is almost a guarantee to hit that mark unless he really falls apart due to injury.

Ilya Kovalchuk, New Jersey
Age: 27
Points: 652 in 641 games

At his current pace, Kovalchuk would need about 340 more games to reach 1,000 points, putting him there early in the 2014-15 season. But that assumes he continues at his career pace — which is a lot faster than his pace with the Devils this season. Kovalchuk was the focus of the offense from the time he arrived in the NHL with the Thrashers until the Devils acquired him last February. Since then, he’s struggled to fit into New Jersey’s system, first under coach Jacques Lemaire and this season under new coach John MacLean.

My take: Not only am I confident that Kovalchuk will hit the 1,000 point mark soon, but I wonder if he might reach that plateau before he wins a playoff series in his career. That’s messed up, I know, but you never know.

Alex Ovechkin, Washington
Age: 25
Points: 555 in 418 games

At his current pace, Ovi would reach the 1,000-point milestone in 335 more games, meaning he’d get there early in 2014-15 — and putting him in a race with Kovalchuk to become the fourth Russian to get there. Both players are big, strong, fast and talented. However, Ovechkin is much more of a physical player, making him more susceptible to injuries — he missed 10 games to injuries and suspensions last season after missing just four (three for a family matter) in his first four seasons.

My take: Not only will Ovechkin hit that one grand mark, he has a great chance to do so before he even turns 30 years old. Maybe the talk of physical play will hamper him in a chase to 2,000 points, but I’ve heard that logic year after year yet he remains far less injury prone than his contemporary point scoring rival Sidney Crosby.

John Kreiser mentions players such as Pavel Dastyuk and Milan Hedjuk among his picks as “longshots” to hit that mark, but the most interesting duo in that group is the Sedin twins.

Henrik Sedin and Daniel Sedin
Age: 30
Points: 596 in 748 games (Henrik); 571 in 725 games

Vancouver’s twins may get to 1,000 points (becoming the first twins to do so), but they’ll be hard-pressed to get there before players like Hossa, Kovalchuk or Ovechkin. Still, both are coming off their best seasons in the NHL and have produced 24 points in 20 games for the Canucks this season. Even if they produce at last season’s rate of roughly 1.36 points per game, they each would need nearly five full seasons to reach 1,000 points — by which time Hossa, Kovalchuk and Ovechkin (and maybe more) should be past that mark.

My take: Sure, they won’t be the next ones to get there, but considering the fact that their less-than-rugged styles will keep them relatively less exposed to injury, I think they will become the first pair of twins to score 1,000 points each. Heck, it might only take five more seasons if they keep playing like they have been.