Ken Hitchcock

Blues head coach Ken Hitchcock wins Jack Adams


Prior to this season, Ken Hitchcock had been nominated for the Jack Adams three times in his career but had never taken home the award.

Turns out the fourth time was a charm.

Hitchcock captured his first-ever coach of the year trophy at the NHL Awards show on Wednesday night, beating out fellow Adams nominees Paul MacLean (Ottawa Senators) and John Tortorella (New York Rangers).

The win caps off a truly remarkable season for the NHL’s oldest head coach. Hitchcock, 60, had been out of the NHL since Feb. 2010 before taking over a struggling Blues team that was 6-7-0 and in 14th in the Western Conference.

What transpired after the November takeover was one of the greatest in-season turnarounds in franchise history, as the Blues went 43-15-11 to finish the year atop the Central Division (first win since 1999-2000) and second overall in the Western Conference.

With the win, Hitchcock becomes the fourth coach in St. Louis history to capture the Jack Adams, joining Red Berenson (1981), Brian Sutter (1991) and Joel Quenneville (2000).

Hitchcock reflects

Hitchcock had plenty to say about winning the award, especially when it came to connecting with young players. That meant finding ways to connect with players, which perhaps wasn’t that difficult since Hitchcock said that he enjoys “their music.”

(He wouldn’t name any names, but he raved about watching concerts on the Palladia network. Go ahead, imagine Hitchcock listening to The Arcade Fire now.)

“I pride myself in being current,” Hitchcock said. “More than anything I’m fascinated by this age group because Generation Y, the big thing is ‘why?’ They ask that question every day. They don’t just do what they’re told, they want to know why … this generation is making us as coaches more accountable than we’ve ever been in our life. If they don’t buy what we’re selling, they’re not going to go and play for you.”

Hitchcock did an interesting job putting that Blues team in perspective. Interestingly enough, he said that the best team he ever coached was the 2004 Philadelphia Flyers, not one of the Dallas Stars squads. His best work as a bench boss might surprise some people, too.

“The best job we’ve ever done as a staff was the one in Columbus when we went to the playoffs,” Hitchcock said. “That team over-achieved every day.”

This might have been his first Jack Adams, but you got the feeling that the nod was as much a validation of a great body of work than a singular achievement. Still, Hitchcock gives every indication that we haven’t seen the best of this Blues team – but that might require some of his best work, too.

Ken Hitchcock thinks Drew Doughty is the best player in the series

Drew Doughty

If there’s anything Ken Hitchcock would know a thing or two about it’s how well defenseman are playing. He’s a tough defense-loving coach and after seeing three straight games of the Kings putting his Blues in a headlock, he’s got a good idea who is doing the most damage to his squad.

For Hitchcock, the guy that’s been best so far in the series is Kings defenseman Drew Doughty. Hitchcock tells Lisa Dillman of the Los Angeles Times Doughty compares very favorably with his own blue liner in Alex Pietrangelo in how they both handle the game.

“They can absorb a check and lug out the puck out themselves. You can’t find that very often. That’s what he [Doughty] does. You think you’ve got him. He pulls away on you. You think you’ve got him pinned on the boards; he pulls it off the boards and makes the play. Both guys are great at it.”

Doughty has been a physical as well as a play making force against St. Louis and one of many Kings who are making life miserable for the Blues. After scoring a goal and adding two assists in Game 3 it seems as if Doughty is only getting better as the series rolls along. With the Blues a game away from elimination, that doesn’t bode well at all for their future.

Ken Hitchcock has some unorthdox views on playoff re-seeding

Toronto Maple Leafs v St. Louis Blues

From Jeremy Rutherford of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:


Full marks to Hitch for pushing the “no, no, WE’RE the underdog” narrative, but this is a stretch.

That said, I do like it when people punctuate something that’s clearly false with “c’mon, everyone knows that” — it’s the ultimate sales job. I once convinced a buddy that Sting used to be in The Rolling Stones using that technique.