Alex Ovechkin

Ovechkin credits Oates for MVP win, says foot is healing fine


Alex Ovechkin taking home his third career Hart Trophy yesterday may have been seen as an upset by some, but for the Russian superstar he says he wouldn’t have done it without Adam Oates.

In speaking on a conference call today, Ovechkin says he put all his faith into Oates to lead him right, especially when moving from left wing to right wing.

“I told him, ‘Thank you very much.’ I’m just happy because, again, it’s history. It means a lot for me. It’s history,” Ovechkin said.

“I tell Adam I’m going to go along with you starting the first day. I tell him, ‘I trust you.’ He said, ‘Okay, just listen to me and you are going to be okay.’ I listened to him. Right now almost — I’m okay.”

Oates has been Ovechkin’s biggest supporter as well this season and what one was able to do for the other is evident. After the “good old days” under Bruce Boudreau to the rough time he had with Dale Hunter, it’s fun to see Ovechkin find a new buddy in Adam Oates.

As for the hairline fracture in his foot, Ovechkin says it’s healing just fine.

“Foot is okay. Right now I’m working fine. I’m going to start playing tennis soon. I’m going to be in good shape.”

Watch Mike Milbury critique Alex Ovechkin


The Philadelphia Flyers are really handing it to the Washington Capitals on Wednesday. When things go poorly for the Caps, the attention frequently shifts to their highly paid star Alex Ovechkin.

That was the case during the second intermission of tonight’s game, as Mike Milbury provided this passionate critique of Ovechkin’s effort and production:

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

Milbury has weighed in on the famous 27-year-old several times before. Here are some choice cuts:

Is he still elite?

Has he been used correctly?

Looking back at Bruce Boudreau’s firing

Crosby vs. Ovechkin – the next Magic vs. Bird?

Ovechkin felt “trapped” by Hunter, wasn’t happy last year

Alex Ovechkin

Alex Ovechkin struggled — at least relative to the extremely high standards he’s held to — last season. He had a career-low 65 points, and former coach Dale Hunter limited his playing time in the postseason.

“With more ice I can give more to the team,” Ovechkin said to Chuck Gormley of CSN Washington. “It was [Hunter’s] decision and he had his own mind and his own kind of personality and his own systems. Of course sometimes I felt trapped.”

The superstar forward kept his frustrations to himself at the time, which is something he felt was necessary because the team was in the middle of a playoff run. Still, he wasn’t happy last season and he’s convinced he can do more for his team.

He might get that chance under new coach Adam Oates.

“I just feel trust,” Ovechkin said when asked about his impression of Oates. “It’s the most important thing for any player. When you feel trust from your coach you feel unbelievable and you want to go play for him. Right away when I met him I just feel it.”

The Moscow-native also feels good about Oates’ system and thinks the Capitals will play well in it.

Regardless though, Ovechkin is likely to at very least seem happy.

“I’m always smiling,” he said. “It doesn’t matter. I’m always smiling.”


Brett Hull on Ovechkin: “He’s going to thrive under Oates”

Holtby likely starter for Caps’ opener, No. 1 gig still open

Boudreau admits he wanted the Caps to lose

Bruce Boudreau

He may have landed on his feet in Anaheim, but Bruce Boudreau still didn’t want the team that fired him to do well in last year’s playoffs.

The former head coach of the Washington Capitals, now the Ducks’ bench boss, confessed as much in an interview with

“I think human nature dictates that I didn’t want them to win,” Boudreau said. “I think that’s just human nature. I was hoping for some players to have success and players I really like to do well and they did, but quite frankly nobody ever admits it — and maybe I just did — but I wasn’t exactly pulling for them because it would have validated me losing my job.”

Boudreau was fired by the Capitals in November after a tumultuous stint in Washington that included plenty of regular-season success but repeated playoff disappointment.

Along the way the Caps went from playing a run-and-gun style to practically the opposite end of the spectrum under Boudreau’s replacement, Dale Hunter.

Purely from an X’s and O’s standpoint, Washington’s been a fascinating team to watch the past few seasons. (Not to mention all the other drama.)

Come to think of it, one of the many unfortunate aspects of the NHL lockout is that we still don’t know how the Caps will play under new head coach Adam Oates.

Related: Alex Ovechkin ready for offense under Oates

Ovechkin “still might have to dump it in and block a shot once in a while”

Alex Ovechkin

Adam Oates plans to “push the pace and be an aggressive team” when he takes over behind Washington’s bench next season; however, he doesn’t “see any reason to change” how the Capitals played under Dale Hunter, so far as the “little things” are concerned.

Echoing Oates’ sentiments, general manager George McPhee put it this way when talking about Alex Ovechkin at today’s introductory press conference: “He still might have to dump it in and block a shot once in a while.”

Yesterday, Ovechkin said he was excited at the prospect of playing for an offensive-minded coach: “It’s not blocking the shots and it’s not dump and chase.”

Thus, McPhee’s quip.

Caps associate goaltending coach Olie Kolzig thinks Oates will strike a “great balance” between Hunter and the guy that preceded Hunter, Bruce Boudreau.

“Dale was a blue collar guy who believed in defensive hockey,” Kolzig told

“When he took over [for Boudreau on Nov. 28] we were a very fragile hockey team both defensively and offensively. And the way he corrected it was by saying, ‘Hey, if we can’t score goals we can sure as hell prevent them.’ And to his credit he got all the guys to buy in. We were one game away from going to the conference finals.

“But we still maybe weren’t utilizing the players that we had.”

For example, Ovechkin, who saw limited ice time under Hunter when the Caps were trying to protect a lead, e.g. Game 2 of Washington’s second-round series against the Rangers in which Ovechkin played just 13:36.

Watch the full press conference below: